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Found 24 results

  1. I don't post very much here on Oblivion State, So I thought I'd best start posting a bit more. Be warned this is going to be a picture heavy one. History I'm being purposefully vague as this place needs protecting from the cretins that unfortunately will take joy in ruining such a delightful property. 'Punch Lodge' as I'm calling it, was used by a large business as a management training facility. It had accommodation for the people attending the training courses, presumably running for several days or weeks at a time. The Lodge has roughly 20 rooms for accommodation, as well as lounge, bar and dining room areas. It also has a lovely round shed, swimming pool and a tennis court. It was used from at least 1980 and closed down in around 2007. I'm still trying to find more information about it, and I'll add any new information I find as an edit here. The Explore So like many of my finds, this was a Google Maps spot that I decided to go check out on the off chance. Normally with these things its a gamble as it's either been converted, knocked down, sealed up or was never derelict at all. I had a good feeling about this one though. As I approached it I could see a building over the fence, and what looked like a couple broken window panes. Carefully wandering down the overgrown path, I was presented with a big messy courtyard and the front of the lodge. There was a couple fire extinguishers chucked on the ground, the usual sign that kids had been in messing around. Access was simply an open door, so an excellent start already. Exploring from room to room, I was flabbergasted what I was seeing, the house was pristine! It almost was too good, I was expecting for an alarm to go off at any moment and the fuzz to show up. The house has 2 floors plus a 2nd floor loft conversion (with roof access too!). To my surprise the power was still on. Many of the lights still worked. A good amount of the rooms were filled full of crap, almost as if they were using it as storage. I found a few offices with lots of paperwork left. It was mostly tax returns and business related documents. Obviously the house was used to run a business from, but there was quite a few different business names to the address. However now that I know it was used for business and management training it makes a little more sense. I headed outside to explore the surrounding land. After fighting through brambles and trees I found a very full up swimming pool and the tennis court. I did a bit of research once I got home and found that there were numerous businesses that still had this address as its registered office. I don't have a very good knowledge of the inner works of running a business, but to have a registered office as the address of derelict property seems a bit naughty to me. Photos Externals This is the main courtyard area. You can see piles of rubbish and fire extinguishers that have been chucked about. Internals The main lobby area was pristine. This is the main door and porch area. The lounge area. The bar area used as storage for furniture. The dinning room The kitchen with everything left untouched once again. The downstairs office with lots of paperwork still left. Lots of silverware stuffed into a case?! This looks like it was used as a training room Upstairs. The long corridor with lots of bedrooms. A few of the rooms looked like they were being renovated. A few were being used for storage. Most had the same bright orange curtains. Bit of Sangria anyone? Another office type area, except I spotted something interesting in here. A CCTV monitor that was in standby mode. I hit the power button and all 4 cameras had VIDEO LOSS, so either they weren't set up properly or someone has disconnected them. The top floor consisted of a big bedroom with en-suite bathroom. Adding to the fun, there was roof access from one of the windows! Outside area By the corner of the house was a round shed that had a fantastic ceiling. The woodlands behind the house is very overgrown and it was a struggle to fight through the foliage to find anything. Found the swimming pool! Almost stepping right in as rain water had filled it to ground level. The tennis court. Thanks for reading.
  2. There has been a good few reports on Clockhouse Brickworks over the last couple years, however none since they put up the new fence and filled in a lot of the access points. This didn't stop me and Brewtal however, as we ninja'd our way inside. That said, it was by far the hardest access I've ever found, full credit to the people who sealed this place up as they did a top job. We had been planning this explore for a little while now, including drone photography and scouting trips, so it was satisfying to say the least when the plan came together at the end. I visited here back in early 2015, so its was interesting to see what had changed and how much is still intact. It's sad to say that it has been well trashed and vandalised since the last visit. The last 18 months have not been kind to Clockhouse, which might be why they have erected a big fence around it. It certainly seems be a magnet for undesirables who want to steal copper and lead etc. This said, it's still remarkable how much machinery and tooling is still left, despite years of decay. I actually used to know someone who was an ex-employee here who told me a little about it. He said that shortly before it closed they had spent vast amounts of money on a new piece equipment/machinery, all of which went to complete waste. Not sure whether its true or not, but he claimed that due to the requirement to comply with new Health and safety standards, it worked out to be more expensive to bring the site up to scratch, than it was to close it and start from scratch elsewhere. I'd imagine in reality this was one of a few factors that lead to it's closure. It's pretty sad because he said he really enjoyed working there. History 'The Clock House Brick Company Ltd was founded c.1933 to exploit a rich deposit of high-quality Weald Clay to the south of the Surrey village of Capel. The outbreak of war in 1939 was bad news for brickmaking, as housebuilding effectively ceased and the workforce was swallowed up by conscription. Although there was some demand for bricks to be used in military engineering projects, there was little use for the high-grade ceramic blocks made at Clock House. By 1941, the Company was in liquidation and sold the majority of its share capital to the London Brick Company (LBC) to avoid closing the works. In 1945, the Company was wound up for good and the works were acquired by the LBC. Under LBC, production was substantially increased to meet demand from the recovering housing market and in the 1960s the factory was rebuilt to accommodate more efficient production methods. London Brick was acquired by Hanson PLC in 1984 the works was refitted shortly afterwards to produce multi stock bricks under the Butterley and Capel brand names. In 1998, Clockhouse Bricks were used by three major exhibitors in that year's Ideal Home Show and by 2000, Clock House was be Hanson’s main soft mud production site, making around 42 million bricks per year. The global financial crisis of 2008 hit the building materials industry hard, however: a sudden slump in housing prices meant that house-building ground almost to a halt and demand for bricks plummeted. In March 2009, Hanson announced a 'phased closure programme' which began later that month and led to the loss of 61 jobs. Hanson have since indicated that there is no intention to re-activate the brickworks or extract clay from the adjacent pits. Since closure, Clock House Brickworks has been in limbo, slowly being stripped of anything valuable while a lengthy audit determines the planning conditions surrounding re-use of the site. Plans for an incinerator ('energy from waste facility') on the site, bitterly opposed by local residents, were thrown out by a High Court Judgment in 2009 and the future of the site is now uncertain.' (The Derelict Miscellany :: Clock House Brickworks) The Explore As previously mentioned, they have erected a 6ft palisade fence all the way around the site. Getting past this was surprisingly easy, getting inside the building was not. We sneaked round the outside of the building look for ways in. We saw one potential one, but it seemed tricky. After ruling out every other option(not that we had many others) we decided to give it a go. It took a couple of goes but we managed it just about. We were in! It's almost overwhelming to see the vast array of machinery, walkways and control panels. It's hard to know where to even start at photographing it. Getting out proved to both easier but more painful. I managed to slip and ended up with a nice big bruise an inch below the nipple. It certainly got Brewtal worried. Exploring is dangerous kids. Drone Shots Interior Shots The Drying oven The Tool room. There used to be a big pillar drill in here, but that has disappeared. The press for the bricks. The chair shot, of course. The maintenance room has been trashed. Lol. Thanks for reading and happy Christmas!
  3. History Oxted Quarry is a site owned by Southern Gravel Ltd (SGL). Those who drive the southern part of the M25 often might have seen it as its quite visible about mile west of the Clacket Lane services. The site has been operating from as early as the 1940s and finally came to a close in 2012 when locals complained about the HGV traffic. Pressure from the locals start in around 2007 when the traffic from the site increased due to increasing numbers of operations on the site. SGL in a what was deemed as somewhat of a panic response closed the site with the aim to convert the area into housing. In November 2014 the council refused the application to build housing and the site has been left derelict ever since. Personally, the road going up to the quarry is tiny, winding and very steep and is totally unsuitable to deal with any level of increased residential traffic, let alone HGV traffic. I am hardly surprised at the local residents skepticism to the plans. The Explore Me and a friend went to visit here late in the afternoon a couple hours before sunset. To be honest it was a bit of a rush job and I could have happily spent another hour or so there. First I sent the drone over for a bit of recon and it seemed empty, so in we went. It would be entirely possible to walk in the entrance as it wasn't gated, however to play it safe I found a more desecrate way in. Aside from a bit of barbed wire, no issues here. For a site that has been abandoned for only a few years, its really not in a good state. There was some interesting things going on there as well as some rather odd finds. Unfortunately there was some lights and signs of some kind of activity on the lower portion of the quarry towards the entrance, so I didn't get to see as much of it as I wanted. A re-visit at some point might be in order. Aerial Shots The Quarry Under the Lean-to there were boxes of helicopter rotors as well as what appeared to be gearboxes. If anyone can enlighten me what they are doing here, I'd be curious to know. The building behind seemed pretty sealed up, no idea what was inside it. Thanks for reading!
  4. I visited here with Brewtal from over at DP. Thanks for showing us around this place, it was great! Hope you like the drone video. This former manor house was used for Chemical and Optical work. The History for this place is pretty sketchy and I can't anything on it. Its being redeveloped into housing and part of the structure has been emptied and will be demolished. The main house is remaining to be redeveloped from what I understand. The roof is completely missing and has been covered completely by a scaffold roof. The top floor is very surreal because of this. The drone video! https://youtu.be/kZJJd8V4OD0 Thanks for reading!
  5. History: Doughty House is a large house on Richmond Hill in Surrey, England, built in the 18th century, with later additions. It has fine views down over the Thames, and both the house and gallery are Grade II listed buildings. The house was named after Elizabeth Doughty, who lived there from about 1786, and built St Elizabeth of Portugal Church in The Vineyard, Richmond. It was the residence of the Cook baronets from when it was bought in 1849 by the first baronet until after World War II. A 125-foot-long-gallery (38 m) was added in 1885 for the very important family art collection. The house was damaged by bombing in the Second World War and the 4th baronet moved to Jersey with 30 paintings from the collection. In 2012 the house was on the market with an asking price of £15,000,000. Future: C18 house with C19 alterations made by the Cook family. Planning Permission and Listed Building Consent have been granted to retain the main property as a single dwelling and to convert the gallery to ancillary accommodation, along with re-instating Doughty Cottage as the link between the house and gallery. The explore: So we spent basically all day in traffic jams to get there and back... The explore itself was surprisingly easy too; I must admit, that from what I have seen of it, I was expecting the place to be a little bigger than it was, but I guess thats the art of the wide angle lens! Anyway, great explore, would definitely revisit providing there are no traffic issues!
  6. Hi all, I normally frequent the likes of Derelict places and 28DL, but I fancied giving Oblivion State a try, so here I am. I've been Urbexing for about 18 months now, and enjoying every moment of it.
  7. UK St Peters - Surrey - March 2015

    I sure as hell aren't going to bore you with the history on this as it has literally been done to death (excuse the pun) probably the easiest explore I have ever done, aside from getting wet feet nothing eventful happened either. Good times I had wanted to do this for a while so after my epic fail at Silverlands the timing was right. I do like a morgue as we know :DI haven't seen anything of this place since March and as I have a backlog I thought I'd post it Don't know who the hell fucked with the curtains but for the record they look shite! 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
  8. UK A Magpies Collection - June 2015

    Hey everyone finally joined up here, an thought id start by sharing this place, visited awhile ago now, an loved it to be honest but recently its been the target of vandals who have trashed and stolen a fair amount of things from here, so thought I would share this place as I found it, last owned by an old gent who I think used to live inside the cottage at one point and then moved in with his children as old age crept in, he occasionally still visits and sweeps around the cottage, but unsure on the situation since vandals have been in. Kind of felt sorry for the old gent really as these are most likely his pride an joy or was. 1 2 3 4 7 8 14 16 Now a quick nose round this small cottage, sadly it was packed of magazines and broken furniture so just picked out some items laying about. 5 10 11 12 13 15 17 18 Cheers for looking everyone an more to come when I get round to it.
  9. Good Afternoon all! This is an old report that I have never posted but I am slowly going through all my pictures and seeing what ones I haven't done and now posting them! Hope you enjoy the pictures! A Boeing 747-200 which served with British Airways until 2002 as City of Birmingham, G-BDXJ, was purchased by a Film Company specialising in supplying aircraft for television and film work, and transferred to Dunsfold. It was modified and used for filming for the 2006 James Bond film Casino Royale. Some of the scenes set at Miami International Airport were filmed at Dunsfold.Modifications to the aircraft include the removal of the normal Rolls Royce engines in separate nacelles and replacement with a single nacelle on each wing with two engines, similar to those fitted to aircraft such as the B-52 Stratofortress. Dummy drop tanks have been fitted where the outer engines would normally be fitted. The aircraft is not flyable at the present moment.The aircraft has also appeared in the background of numerous Science in Action and Top Gear episodes and directly in an episode where it is towed by a JCB Fastrac tractor. It was also towed by a Volkswagen Touareg in a 2006 Top Gear episode, the same year that the modified aircraft and Dunsfold Airfield were featured in a television advertisement filmed for the Volkswagen Touareg, demonstrating the vehicle’s towing ability. In 2008 it featured in an episode of Scrapheap Challenge in which contestants created machines to tow the aircraft.The airfield also found use when filming several scenes inside a plane for Come Fly with Me, starring Matt Lucas and David Walliams. In 2009 for major parts of Episode 4 of ITV Series Primeval featuring a Giganotosaurus, Dunsfold Airfield was used as the location for an unspecified London Airport
  10. Finally got round to taking a look at my pictures from earlier this year.. The explore: Visited with K1N5M4N and ZombieFart on a freezing January morning after I managed to get the wrong meeting spot - of the two same road names on my satnav I managed to chose the wrong one! Anyway, after a bit of a walk and wet feet from a comical log in puddle circus trick, we were on the site and trying to find our entrance. After a bit of mooch we found our way in having scared the pigeons away. I am amazed this place is still as complete as it is having been closed for a while now. Very little graff too, although the half arsed attempt of a security dummy / scarecrow had been overcome - someone had knocked him off his perch. A bit of history (which I'm sure is familiar to most on here): This place sits on a rich deposit of high-quality Weald Clay and when it was found by some intrepid explorer (!) it was shamelessly exploited by the Clock House Brick Company which was founded around 1933. After a few hiccups during and following the war (something about lack of man power - who'd have thought it) the company was sold to the London Brick Company and in 1984 it was acquired by Hanson. The site was again at the wrong end of things when the bottom fell out of the construction market in about 2008 since when its been left idle. With a bit of spit and polish and a good sweep up it looks like it could be up and running again. But then again what do I know! Anyway on with the pics: #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 Thanks for looking
  11. Visited with The_Raw, Lenston, MrDan and DuttyJigsew. Silverlands is a large country house in Chertsey, Surrey, I can't confirm the exact date of construction but it was in the years surrounding 1820, an estate has existed here under the name of 'Silverlond' since at least 1420 according to town records. First owned by Henry Hotham, a hero of the Napleonic wars in the early 19th Century, it's recent history is more controversial, after having served as an orphanage and a nurses training college for much of the latter 20th Century, in 2001 plans were made to relocate patients from Wolvercote Clinic for convicted paedophiles. With 23 schools located within 2.5 miles of the Silverlands estate, one primary school just 5 minutes down the road, this caused a local outrage, on Oct 26th of that year the first of many candlelight vigils were held outside Silverlands by protestors, these were repeated weekly between 17:00 and 19:00 for several months. During these events the buildings went under intense refurbishment and maintenance, the ultimate bill for this and the required security arrangements almost hit £5'000'000. In July of 2002 it was confirmed that Silverlands would not be utilised for the rehabilitation of paedophiles, however the building has been vacant for the most part ever since. The security arrangements in place today I imagine might remain from that time period, it is surrounded by a number of fences, the building itself has a fair amount of cameras, PIRs and loudspeakers located at strategic points. Having seen images of the building not so many years ago, the place is not looking it's best anymore, mostly damage from water leaks through the roof, many of the more ornate and beautiful rooms on the ground floor have collapsing ceilings and damaged floors, electricity still works throughout the building however. Was a nice chilled out visit overall. Photos: I'm not sure where this would have once hung but it's seen better days like most of this place. The central courtyard. Some of the more ornate rooms which make up the ground floors. They're really starting to fall apart. A live feed of the numerous external video cameras, the buzz coming from the substantial comms cabinet to the left doesn't leave me with much doubt it's being beamed elsewhere. Hundreds of keys in here. The main hall. A newspaper upstairs dates back to the last year of permanent occupancy. Pulled from my blog page @ www.unexposed.photography, have linked back to Oblivion State . Cheers for reading.
  12. Hello, I was driving past here a couple of weeks ago and noticed the green hoarding, not knowing what was behind it I done some research. I found out it was Farnham Police Station. They closed it in around 2012 after announcing Police cuts. The place itself only has a couple of interesting rooms but never the less, its a Police Station. A few bits and bobs remained but nothing to exciting. A few law books and a box of needles! Farnham Police Station is situated in central Farnham, just to the south of the town centre, and opposite Gostrey Meadows recreation ground. It is s within the boundary of the defined town centre area and the Farnham Conservation Area. Surrey Police took the decision to sell Farnham Police Station as part of a wider estate restructuring and rationalisation programme. In February 2014 Churchill Retirement Living resubmitted a planning application to provide 50 sheltered/retirement living apartments following a Planning Inspector’s appeal decision in November 2013 dismissing an appeal for insufficient Affordable Housing provision.. Thank You!
  13. Clockhouse Brickworks was a Hansons factory built on a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) near Capel in Surrey. The site lies 600m east of the Auclaye SSSI which was also a former brickworks, geologically it lies on wealden clays (Da Fuq?). It is a site for palentological and sedimentological research covering an area of 32.4 hectares. Similar strata are seen at Warnham. The factory was phased out of production during early 2009 due to the downturn in the construction industry, and a lack of housebuilding projects. Since that time it has sat disused exposed to the elements gathering dust. I visited back in April with Sentinel one lazy afternoon and only just got round to sorting out my pics. It's a fantastic location where the workers seemed to have just downed tools and buggered off without so much as a riverdance. The whole place is covered in a film of orange brick dust and feels like it could return to normal service at the flick of a switch. The highlights for me were the old control panels and the workshop which was full of old tools and machinery. Other highlights included Sentinel being attacked by an owl. It's been covered a few times before but hopefully I've added something a bit different - Tits and Arse. The whole place is painted in green and yellow, a strange colour code for such an industrial setting Dust Masks and other protective equipment lie everywhere as if they were only just taken off Old tracks lead from one end of the factory to the other Old Switch Panel Some areas are deep in sludge where the rain has come through Brick making machinery Lockers, some still with bits and pieces left inside by workers The decoy security guy Reflections A worker's hard hat Cap Thousands of bricks left behind never to be used An old vice on a workbench covered with rusty tools One of the many styles of bricks once produced here Funky Control panel Funky Wheelbarrow Peeking outside Strange looking machinery upstairs The main office Looking down on the bricks Somebody planted a tree! The Workshop Safety Boots still in good nick after all this time Giant Anvil Welder's mask and finally....my favourite shot of the day, the staff Room Cheers for looking
  14. After hearing about this place from a friend we decided to have a look around. Access was easy enough and we quickly made our way into the first building, however some of the machines were still running, and had the keys left in which was strange. Despite this we carried on and found an entrance to another building. Inside we found various parts of old machinery as well as brand new sheets of steel just lying around! Overall pretty good explore!
  15. Not the most interesting place, but an explore is an explore! This facility was also used by Zeneca and Syngenta. The place was completely stripped bare inside, most of the interesting stuff was outside in piles. I have driven past this site countless times and had no idea it was there. It was the aerial view that caught my eye... Most of the rooms inside looked like this... Check the craftsmanship on this wood and glass staircase. Beautiful! The inner courtyards looked landscaped but have since grown out of control. Thanks for looking, hope you enjoyed
  16. The Visit I visited with Sentinel who had an excellent knowledge of this site having been a few times already. I wasn't expecting much but was actually pretty blown away, it was my first time exploring such a place and I think I may have developed a bug for seeking out many more. The original communications switchboard is still down there as well as various other bits and the bunker is split into various different sections. The recently landscaped area around the original cobbled entrances adds a fascinating insight into what the place once looked like from outside. There are sets of triangular stone blocks called 'dragon's teeth' once used to deter tanks from approaching the bunker placed strategically around the site to remind you this was wartime. We explored all the woodland surrounding the bunker convinced that there might be more stuff hidden out there and a couple of hundred metres away we found a room built into the hillside which looked like it may have been a small chapel perhaps. It now has inverted crosses and pentagrams inside so it looks like the devil worshippers have been having a hoedown in there recently, I'd love to know what it is if anyone knows. Anyway onto the history of the place which is probably more interesting than anywhere I've reported on before. I may have stolen Ojay's idea of nicking a few historical shots from t'interweb to show what it used to look like so cheers for that, definitely makes for a more interesting report as far as I'm concerned. The History When the Southern Railway took over Deepdene House (also known as the Deepdene Hotel) for its wartime Headquarters it discovered that there were natural caves in the grounds. These caves had been acknowledged 300 years before in the diaries of John Evelyn. Because of the natural protection afforded by the location of the caves they were eminently suitable for the development of a bunker to house both the sites switchboard and the Traffic Control. The lawn between the caves and the house was used as a site for the 99foot mast supporting aerials of the emergency radio. The bunker was constructed within the caves which were enlarged to house the 30 staff and once complete their emergency headquarters with office staff was moved there from Waterloo. Deepdene House The network of tunnels included a Control Room, meeting room, 3-position switchboard, battery room, main distribution frame (MDF)/maintainers room, a bedroom for the night officer and an air plant and toilet facilities. A 60-foot vertical shaft at the rear of the complex provided an air inlet and emergency exit. A 4 foot thick concrete slab covered the complex but no protection was provided against a ‘near miss’. The Southern Railway General Manager Eustace Missenden lived nearby and had a switchboard extension in his house. During the air raids he spent many nights there with his wife and it is reputed that the Prime Minister, Winston Churchill was a visitor. The bunker consisted of a series of tunnels partly natural driven into the steep hillside to the rear of the former hotel. There were three entrances plus a fourth emergency exit accessed from the hillside 50 feet above via a spiral staircase. Even after the war the exchange remained in use and one visitor in the 1960's remembers three operators and he noticed one of the side tunnels still contained bunk beds. Night Officer's Room British Railways left Deepdene in the mid 1960's and the house was demolished in 1969 with a modern office block being built on the site; this is now the Headquarters of Kuoni Travel. For many years the tunnels lay forgotten in the bushes to the rear of the office block but in 1997 local children started a small fire just inside one of the entrance tunnels and when the fire brigade came to extinguish the it they found the whole network was heavily contaminated with asbestos, so much so that they had to dispose of all their clothes after the incident. As a result of this information, Kuoni commissioned a survey of the tunnels by Redhill Analysts who confirmed that most of the complex and two of the small surface buildings were heavily contaminated with both white asbestos (Chrysotile) and blue asbestos (Crocidolite). Shortly afterwards all four entrances, and the contaminated surface buildings were sealed. In June 1999 Subterranea Britannica approached Kuoni for permission to break into the tunnels to carry out a photographic survey and although English Heritage had previously been turned down permission was granted on the understanding that the entrance was repaired the same day and those people entering the tunnels signed a relevant disclaimer. The bunker has since been left behind and will likely remain under the ground for years to come. The Pics: The original entrances Not for the faint-hearted this staircase.... Before and after shots The original traffic control switchboard I'm not a fan of eight legged freaks and there are many on the way down that sketchy staircase.... Emergency exit The dragon's teeth The room built into the hillside with signs of devil worship inside.... More dragon's teeth and probably my favourite shot from the day.... More shots can be found here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/74870643@N02/sets/72157644074503713/ Hope you enjoyed looking, I really enjoyed putting this one together so thanks for checking it out
  17. Hello I've been looking at all your photos on the Facebook group for a while but finally got my ass in gear and join the forum. Ive been urbexing on and off for about 5 years now, my first find being West Park. This led me to look online to find more and came to the realisation that there were hundreds of other people who do this and post photos! Lately I've been travelling around a bit trying to find new stuff but its hard! Loved going to europe, they seem to have more derelict sites than any around me... everything gets built up too quickly around here. Thanks all for sharing your photos. I love flicking through them and reading your reports. I'm on Facebook as Steph UE also. Nice to meet ya
  18. I'd been wanting to visit this place for ages, I went with two 28DL members; sentinel, and juicerail, the last of whom was actually born in there. With it being within such close proximity of military bases etc there is a lot of security, gurkhas and dog handlers patrol the grounds 24 hours a day. Nevertheless we began our explore with some ninja skills and quickly we were inside. We had a good three hours or so in the maternity building which not only has the bleeding doors but the bleeding everything pretty much, bleeding walls, cartoon characters, sinks, you name it. It's quite a creepy place and to think that babies were delivered in there seems quite bizarre looking at the state of it now, my mate juicerail turned out ok though just about! On leaving the maternity ward we were unfortunately spotted by a gurkha who quickly called for backup and waved at us a lot. He looked friendly enough so we decided to turn ourselves in rather than run which was appreciated and we were treated amicably by the gurkhas and the fuzz when they arrived. Shame we didn't make it inside the main hospital building but we were all pretty chuffed with what we did manage to see. The History: The Cambridge Military Hospital (CMH) was the fifth military hospital built in Aldershot. It was opened on 18th July in 1879 and named after Prince George, the Duke of Cambridge who was the commander-in-chief of the army at the time. It was built on a hill because the thinking at the time was that the wind would sweep away any infection and clean the air. The section which we explored was built in 1897 and named The Louise Margaret Hospital after Princess Louise Margaret, whose husband (the Duke of Connaught) was the GOC of Aldershot Command at the time. It was the largest family hospital ever to be erected by the military sevice to begin with, initially caring for the wives and children of servicemen until 1958 when it became a maternity hospital. During the First World War Cambridge Military Hospital was the first base hospital to receive casualties directly from the Western Front and also the first place where plastic surgery was performed in the British Empire. After the Second World War, with the decline in importance of Britain's military commitments, civilians were admitted to the hospital. It pioneered the supply of portable operating theatres and supplies for frontline duties, and also contained the Army Chest Unit. It was closed on 2 February 1996 due to the high cost of running the old building as well as the discovery of asbestos in the walls. The pics: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. Few more snaps here http://www.flickr.com/photos/74870643@N02/sets/72157641559361794/ Thanks for looking
  19. Nice little explore this. Mint inside, thats why i have posted it here. Please feel free to move this onto the main forum if you should feel like doing. This site is huge with a office block type thing built on the side and a new type building in the same site but was just like a building site inside. Hope you like the pictures. There is security on site and they do patrol, as we found out. History: Originally built in 1876, it was soon to change hands when in 1898 it was sold to the wealthy Scottish industrialist Sir Charles Tennant, who used it as an out of London house for entertaining. The brewing family Charrington were custodians from 1911 until 1946, until it was sold to the Ministry of Supply in 1948. After that it became home to the Ministry of Defence from 1948 until 1996. A company then bought it with the intention of turning the house into a hotel and the grounds into a business park but they proved a tad too ambitious and the company went into receivership.
  20. Hello! This was my third visit with two previous fails. After reading past reports and the last report being 2010, I knew the security was good but not that good! We found our entry and then we was counting down, the alarm was going off, all the flood lights on! Not knowing how long we had and who was coming we carried on! We took a few pictures before the 2 security guards got us and walked us out, giving us loads of talk about breaking and entering and then called the Police! Before we knew it, 2 Police vans and 4 Police cars!!!! What a waste of tax payers money! Searched us and on our way! Here is the video of the explore and crazy bitch security! http://youtu.be/7bBXYnNg6CI History: The exact date Silverlands was built is unknown, however it is thought to be between 1818-1825, the first owner being Vice-Admiral the Rt. Hon Sir Frederick Hotham. Silverlands was used as the Hotham family home until approximately 1887. The Actors Orphanage was started in 1896 and was both a home and school to approx 60 children. The home and school was moved to Silverlands, Chertsey in 1938. In 1941 it became a female nurse’s school for the nearby Botley Park Asylum and St Peter’s Hospital. This ran alongside the buildings use by the Actors Orphanage, until 1958 when the Orphanage Ceased to exist. In 1990 Silverlands Nursing School amalgamated with other schools of nursing in Surrey and Hampshire to become the Francis Harrison College of nursing and midwifery. At some point in the late 1990’s Silverlands ceased it’s role as a nursing school and the National Probation Service was looking for a new site for the ‘residential assessment and intervention programmes for adult males with allegations of, or convictions for, sexual offences involving children’. Silverlands in Chertsey was considered the most appropriate. The proposal was met with strong opposition from local people who organised a candlelit vigil to protest about the site being used for such a purpose and were concerned about the impact of the 7000 children attending the 25 schools within a 2.5 mile radius of Silverlands. After a lot of debating and protests on 4th July, 2002, it was confirmed by the Home Office Minister that Silverlands will not become the home of the Wolvercote paedophile clinic. However during this time, the Grade 2 listed building had already had £3.7 million pounds spent on its refurbishment. It remains empty. Its future uncertain.
  21. UK BroadOaks, Surrey. May 2013

    Broadoaks estate, Surrey. Visited May 2013 and returned August I visited with a friend. This was my second visit. First was brilliant, no security in sight, and full access. Second visit was a bit of a disappointment. Access was limited, and a lot of the good rooms are locked up. Plus with the wandering security, we found ourselves hiding in a bush for half an hour while he ambled by. Even though it's well kept and not crumbly, I still love this location. A proper gorgeous building, except the nasty extension on the side... As with a couple of my other early albums, some of these pictures are a bit orange. These overlooked the perimeter fence; a relic from it's MOD days The car garage/workshop. This was sealed when I returned. And lastly, 'Municipal Flat Block 18A'. The nasty 1970's MOD extension. Thanks for looking, hope you enjoyed!!
  22. Visited this as our last port of call on a day out in surrey, This place is really stunning but very stripped out. A nice lil mooch all the same, Seems they are on the ball here now, with a lot of rooms locked up so didnt get to see everywhere, Built in 1876 by Ernest Seth-Smith for his elder brother Charles, incorporating part of an older house on the ground floor, in 1898 the house was sold to Sir Charles Tennant, wealthy industrialist and patron of the arts who, aged 75, had just married his 2nd wife Marguerite who was to bear him 4 children. The main Tennant property was in Scotland but this house appears to be an out of London house for entertaining, Surrey becoming very popular at the time. The brewery owning Charrington family owned Broadoaks from 1911 to 1946 when it was sold to the Ministry of Supply. In 1948 it housed the Army Operational Research Group and was in military occupation until 1996.
  23. My first report on here, This place has been done loads, i finally got round to dropping in while in the area... Originally St. Peter’s Hospital was built to serve casualties of the Second World War, The mortuary was built in the 1940's on the edge of the site. However after extensive redevelopment of the site, the mortuary was found to be too small to cope with the increase in cadavers. This mortuary was shut down in April 2009 and moved to the new building which is central to to main hospital
  24. Built in 1876 by Ernest Seth Smith for his brother Charles, and then by Sir Charles Tennant (M.P.) from 1898-1911, then in 1911 the Charrington (Brewing) family aquired it. The Ministry of Supply brought Broadoaks in 1946 and absolutley ruined the building with a huge 'modern'post war extension Its a nice building with some very ornate features but its sadly not 'derelict' enough for me
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