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Found 8 results

  1. The Visit Having tried this in the past with no luck and wanting to see this building for a while now I had to make the journey back to Liverpool to try, try and try again and luck was on my side this time. Have to say it was well worth the journey. Only hope that no "undesirables" get in this building and cause any damage. The History The Greenbank Drive Synagogue was built in 1936/7 and is the work of the notable Liverpool architect Sir Ernest Alfred Shennan. Most of his other work is also in Merseyside and comprises a diversity of building types. His inter-war designs included Westminster Banks; five cinemas including the listed Forum Cinema on Lime Street, Liverpool; restaurant interiors (The French Café and Arabic Café, both 1933, Liverpool); dance halls (The Grafton Rooms, Liverpool, 1934); hotels and office blocks. Greenbank Drive is Shennan’s only synagogue and is very different to the rest of his oeuvre up to that time which, apart from the banks, was distinctive art deco. To put this building in context: in the first half of the 20th century, Anglo Jewry did not enthusiastically adopt international modern architecture for its new synagogues and community buildings. (This is in dramatic contrast to Jewish Community buildings in Palestine and the emergent State of Israel during the 30’s and 40’s, which produced the most extensive legacy of modern movement buildings anywhere.) Owen William’s Dollis Hill Synagogue (1936, now mutilated) was the only genuinely modern movement synagogue. Though there are some impressive deco influenced synagogues dating from the late 1920s, they are all to some degree exercises in historicism, often combined with exoticism. (See for example the splendid Byzantine art deco of the former Leeds New Synagogue, now the Northern School of Contemporary Dance, 1938 by J Stanley Wright and Clay.) Greenbank Drive is very different as in its design Shennan produced a synthesis of his previous art deco style and other modern architectural tendencies. It directly reflects Swedish architectural influences, both in the exterior of the building, which is clearly inspired by the late fruition of the Swedish national romantic style, and in its interior, which draws on contemporary Swedish functionalism. In consequence, Greenbank stands alone as a synagogue which is really significant in terms of the progressive architecture of its time. Although clearly not ‘international modern’, it was a genuine attempt at a new architecture appropriate for a modern synagogue, and succeeds in these terms. We are for once looking forward, not back to an exotic past.
  2. History: Built in the 1930’s The Ark is not a traditional synagogue, but is certainly in keeping with the Art Deco style of the era. The building incorporated a number of architectural advancements to successfully create a modernised synagogue experience. The amazing space is inviting and has an intimate feel despite being huge – there was seating for around 700 people. The light flooding in from the windows around the top creates a light and airy feel. Explore: This was the second location we visited on my little trip up north, and had the pleasure of visiting here with loocyloo, redhunter and whynotdie. safe to say this was a relativity uneventful explore, but a lovely quiet one nonetheless. I think the most dramatic thing was a hunt for a torch loocyloo decided to loose! Wanted to visit this place for a while, and i'm glad i finally got the chance. The place is looking a little worse for wear now, with signs of graffiti and vandalism present - a real shame for such a beautiful building. As always, thanks for looking!
  3. Number four of my hundreds of back logged reports to do! Can i first of all apologise for the angle of my images, these were taken on my S5 Visited with -Raz- and 2 non members on our trip around Lancashire. The Explore; At first we were sure we werent going to get into this building as every door, door window, nook and cranny seemed to be well secured. However after a quick stroll we found an access point. Once inside we made our way through what resembled a working mens club but we paid little attention to this until we were leaving, as we were dying to see the main hall. After a quick scope around we found the hall and all went our seperate ways to each take in the location as we wanted. this building has the tell tale signs of small scale looting by either pikeys or other undesirables but is for the most part a very tidy location and makes for a good explore! Unfortunately we only had limited time on this location as we needed to do another before returning to Yorkshire so a revsit is well needed! Bit of background; Greenbank synagogue was built in 1936 to a design by architect Alfred Ernest Shennan and consecrated on August 15,1937. It became a refuge for homeless families in the Blitz. This historic city synagogue which closed after 70 years has been saved for future generations. The building shut for good on January 8 after its congregation dwindled to fewer than 40, with only one service being held a week. But its survival is now assured after its listed building status was upgraded to Grade II*, putting it on a par with Croxteth Hall and the Cunard and Port of Liverpool buildings. English Heritage agreed the change after a plan emerged to convert the concrete, steel and brick building into apartments. The organisation’s report described the synagogue as “one of the finest art deco synagogues in the countryâ€. It added: “It has an important socio-historic significance as an inter-war synagogue of 1936-7 that represents one of the last free cultural expressions of European Jewry before the Holocaust.†The upgrading from grade II to II* status puts the former synagogue in the top 5% of all listed buildings in the country Now for some photos; Thanks for looking Find more on my page @ www.facebook.com/seldomseenworldue
  4. UK Greenbank Synagogue Dec 14

    I was dead excited to see this place, then the day before we came a report was posted saying it had been sealed up. Gutted! Then to our amazement, we found a window, unboarded and open. Mazel tov!!! Shame to see this place so trashed. The metal has gone, the flooring is being nicked and all the Jewish stuff wrecked Thanks for looking
  5. Beautiful building this is. Such a shame to see it go to waste and ruin. Hopfully it will be saved soon! Shalom! Greenbank synagogue was built in 1936 to a design by architect Alfred Ernest Shennan and consecrated on August 15,1937. It became a refuge for homeless families in the Blitz. This historic city synagogue which closed after 70 years has been saved for future generations. The building on Greenbank Drive, Sefton Park, shut for good on January 8 after its congregation dwindled to fewer than 40, with only one service being held a week. But its survival is now assured after its listed building status was upgraded to Grade II*, putting it on a par with Croxteth Hall and the Cunard and Port of Liverpool buildings. English Heritage agreed the change after a plan emerged to convert the concrete, steel and brick building into apartments. The organisation’s report described the synagogue as “one of the finest art deco synagogues in the countryâ€Â. It added: “It has an important socio-historic significance as an inter-war synagogue of 1936-7 that represents one of the last free cultural expressions of European Jewry before the Holocaust.†The upgrading from grade II to II* status puts the former synagogue in the top 5% of all listed buildings in the country. Thank You Please!
  6. UK The Ark (February 2014)

    The Ark. An all too brief visit to this former synagogue known as… The Ark Thanks for looking! High res copies @ www.zerourbex.co.uk/2014/02/the-ark/
  7. NK discovered this place last year, but we were thwarted in our initial attempts by thick summer brambles and impenetrable boarding!! Fast forward a few months and a couple of pictures pop up on FB... WHAAAT!!?? WELLIES ON SHORT ROUND, LETS GO!! 'Raiders of the lost Ark' No deadly booby traps or giant rolling death boulders to hinder our entry, but there was a table against the access point which needed shifting! And it was quite heavy!! A crackin mooch for a Saturday morning! And ended up with some unexpected company... Nice to see ya lads!! Right... On with the pics which, as usual, are from the pair of us... ENJOY!! Well, there you have it... Thanks for lookin yow lot!!
  8. What a place, it's practically like a museum with all the religious artefacts, old photographs and documents left behind. The last I heard a local Rabbi has now taken the Torah scrolls to safety so we were lucky to have seen them on our viit. I visited with a non-member. This synagogue was designed by architect Alfred Ernest Shennan, famous for designing many cinemas in the area. The foundation stone was laid on 14th June 1936 by Baron Tobias Globe in the presence of Dr J.H. Hertz, the chief Rabbi of the British Emire at the time. The building was consecrated on 15th August 1937. During the Second World War the synagogue became a refuge for families who had been rendered homeless by heavy bombing during the Blitz. Over the years eventually the congregation dwindled in size until there were less than 40 regular worshippers and only one service per week so on January the 8th 2007, the doors finally closed after almost 70 years. The building was already listed but in 2008 the status was upgraded to a Grade II listing. English Heritage agreed the change after plans were filed which proposed to convert the concrete, steel and brick building into apartments. The listing report describes the synagogue as “one of the finest art deco synagogues in the countryâ€Â, and the upgrading puts the synagogue in the top 5% of all listed buildings in the UK at this time. The pics, a few the same as everyone else's and hopefully a few different ones: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Thanks for looking

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