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Found 39 results

  1. First things first - this place is a death-trap. Simple as that. And it's quite likely to be worse now than it was when I went. But as I have a bit of an obsession about redundant old cinemas and theatres I left all common sense at the entrance. The building still shows signs of its grand past but sadly any possibility of saving it looks pretty slim, although a Trust has been set up to try to preserve it and bring it back into use. The four-storey building, designed by G. B. Rawcliffe, opened in 1894 as a music hall, before being converted to a cinema in 1938. It was last used as a bingo hall in 1995. ^^^ Not sure about that!
  2. Having seen some older reports on this place and being a sucker for old theatres, it’s one that has always been on my list. Taking the long drive back from work (Bangor to Stockport) I get an email with info that this place is open and doable. I decided to pick @eastyham up and take the 1.5hr trip over to Donny. Ideally I’d of gone during daylight but I didn’t want to miss out on it. So complete darkness it is. Had a bit of bother of some goons who work in the shopping centre but still managed to sneak in another way. Really enjoyed it in here. The floors are mega dodgy towards the front of the building but it is rather lovely along that side where the old dressing rooms are. I particularly loved the fly loft level with the old painted signs and poster remains. History The Doncaster Grand was constructed in 1899 and originally stood on a prominent site in a shopping street facing the main railway station. However, town centre improvements robbed it of any sensible context and it is no longer in a street, but attached rather indirectly to the Frenchgate shopping centre. It still faces the station, however is separated from it by a busy inner ring road which comes so close that it has actually snipped off a lower corner of the stage house. It was threatened with demolition until an energetic local campaign and Friends group secured statutory designation in 1994. The frontage, which, with an improved setting, could again become a local landmark, is three-storeyed. Baroque in treatment, with a complex rhythm of bays articulated by coupled and single pilasters and groupings of arched windows and doorways all rendered. There is a large broken segmental pediment over the three central bays with date 1899. It retains an intimate auditorium. Two well curved balconies with good plasterwork on fronts, the upper gallery is benched. Single pedimented and delicately decorated plasterwork boxes in otherwise plain side walls, flanking a decorative plasterwork rectangular-framed 7.9m (26ft) proscenium. More decorative drops to the ante-proscenium walls, bolection mouldings and plasterwork panels to the stalls and ceiling. Deep central oval ceiling dome. The Grand could quite readily be restored and reopened. It could offer amateur and community drama and musical productions, small scale touring and other activities to complement Doncaster's new venue, Cast. Pics It’s so weird seeing a building as grand as this just surrounded by utter tripe. The old dressing rooms. There was some pipework from the old gas lamps remaining in here. And then the newer porcelain roses with brass? Conduit. This whole side of the building was rotten. It looks like the flat roof bit behind the grand façade is holding water and pissing in when its bad. one of too proper cool dated bar areas. My idea of heaven. A theatre brewdog. For the la la la la LADZ Not sure if this was a ticket or a newspaper clipping? This tiling reminds of any sort of leisure site back when I was a kid. The other bar on the top level. This was suoer cool for me. Not looking good for itself here. Some great art deco styling on the seats. Im guessing this upstairs part was shut off for years whilst it was a bingo hall. LBL? and some old pictures I found on google from when it was a bingo hall.
  3. A very early start for this one. And thanks for my invite from the other 2 lads I went with @GK-WAX and @albinojay arrived here in the pitch black early hours. Luckily we didn’t have any trouble finding our way inside. We’re we found ourselves a room to wait for it to come light enough to have a look around. Watching the bustop across the road. That’s one seriously busy bustop. And another 2 guys turned up giving us a surprise we exchanged a few word and we all carried on. Here’s a few photos and history.. HISTORY Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" 6C566847-A7B2-4B03-8B35-21A83B59D5DD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 11C63D3A-09F5-4CAF-B8DC-2D9DBAE3A34F by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF9E3CFA-46FB-4F59-8E89-05044F4D4E0D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 291685A1-C7A5-4C05-AE0D-EAA5E9E3BE3D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A942D367-319B-4051-9965-CBC9BE782D97 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr B6451F47-AED7-46C9-BC1F-FBB8716DC866 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EFEFBB87-D905-4675-B792-572677174349 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 4FF422D0-9457-4DBB-A0FD-B3A59E0105DA by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6388F9DD-1E6B-43E1-B475-C54D7702ADD7 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 8F93F594-6E02-49A8-90EE-77146630400A by Lavino lavino, on Flickr F0EA6489-742D-4A55-B053-E9407A809A35 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D6912FEB-7A41-4075-BF3F-18CC92A71332 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 82C5654A-58D8-4F3D-ABA7-6FFA3CE99615 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EF6C4F61-3E43-4EA3-99E3-79E7A4CD7986 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 7E8CA3B9-870B-4597-BE8C-822A743FA4B8 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 05FFBC9B-A065-4D18-ADAA-AC06F324A28C by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 596A95BD-32DA-4213-9C8E-06061841A60B by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 732BCB12-D01B-4F4E-9ADF-B1C86B4F2D95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0CCE03D2-1009-4B27-BF40-1FC90159D5C5 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 170B80EE-4ADD-4D0C-9AEE-076DA9AA07D3 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2A00922B-01E0-4236-9129-02F812E7E710 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF19BB97-1E29-4ECC-8B17-A1A4B30B7C95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E4354E42-97FB-4BA5-BC76-2304A4DF14CC by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D3A585BC-9EA7-4A96-A87E-58351FCC62B2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr C88FDA25-E4EC-4269-9D64-A91725F507F2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 9A4FC978-0A5C-43D3-A340-BF4ABF5EC679 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6FED0FA9-4A21-4C0B-ABB0-1D6C5EB0721D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 5056F5C5-4624-400D-BF20-7ECF2C724B3E by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0D7DEB4E-2C2C-4A67-82C6-A80B4153E5DF by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E3A4C8B4-8A02-4816-85BF-51EED2EDFEFD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 18858080-1428-48B5-8F3F-2416CDCDF481 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2FA9A65E-7F5B-4BE6-A4E8-2418BAABEB71 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  4. Not quite the theatre @SpiderMonkey and I intended to visit, but after finding no way into another nearby cinema we thought we'd give the Grand a go. Having not seen anything from this place for quite some time we were pretty surprised to find a way in. Built on the site of a former Circus Hall, the Grand Theatre in Doncaster opened on 27th March 1899. The theatre stood in a prominent position facing Doncaster railway station and featured columns and arches on the frontage. Designed by by J P Briggs and built by local firm Arnold & Sons, it was one of the first theatres in the country to have electric lights. The remnants of older style gas lighting are also still visible in some areas to this day. The Grand was in use as a theatre in 1958 and was then used as a bingo hall until its closure in 1995. The front of the theatre now awkwardly faces and is wedged up against the Frenchgate shopping centre, the distinctive features looking as impressive as ever despite being somewhat hidden away and now out of place. The theatre is generally in good condition. The 2nd balcony level, the Gallery, retains original seating behind a rare example of bench seating towards the front. The circle level has all seating in tact, which had been replaced during the theatres time as bingo hall and still looks new. Some remains of old dressing rooms can be found in void areas and feature some cool old signage. The gallery level had a few rows of seats at the back, the rest of the level was taken up by bench seating Entrance areas and bar And finally some rather cool old signage hidden away in a void space.
  5. The Grand in Banbury opened in 1911 as a live theatre and in 1929 began screening films. It was the first cinema in Oxfordhsire to show a film with sound, and started with “Showboat”. The theatre closed in 1935 for reconstruction and modernisation. The Grand reopened in December 1935 , redesigned in an Egyptian/Deco style by Joseph G. Gomersall of Drury & Gomersall architects. It was taken over by Associated British Cinemas(ABC) in August 1943, but was never renamed. The theatre closed in 1968, and was later used for bingo for 30 years. In 2006 the Grand was converted into a Chicago Rock Cafe which later became Wonderlounge. Despite the many uses, much of the internal decor remains intact including the original proscenium and stage, auditorium plasterwork and the circle – although the circle seats have been removed and is now filled with junk. Amazingly, the projector room still contains the remains of a projector setup – a Peerless lamphouse upon an original stand. Visited with @SpiderMonkey Original frontage and auditorium The proscenium still remains despite the auditorium being converted to a nightclub Egyptian and Art Deco fixtures still remain The bar Conversion to nightclub View down the old auditorium - The circle level is now boxed in above Circle level still retains the theatre's last décor And moving into the saving grace of this place, the original projector room survives.... The original projector room Remains of a projector Original Peerless lamphouse Cinema arc rectifier Plate detail
  6. Opening in 1902, the Theatre Royal in Hyde was a replacement for an older theatre nearby of the same name. The theatre was built by S. Robinson and Sons of Hyde to the design of Campbell and Horsley of Manchester and could seat 1400 people. Two balconies curve round to meet the proscenium, the stage area was large and included a host of dressing rooms to one side. In 1914 a movable screen was added onto the stage to enable the theatre to operate as a part-time cinema. The popularity of live performances declined in the 1970s so the decision was made to convert the theatre to cinema-only use. In 1972 the main auditorium was used as a full-time cinema screen, with the stage area being converted into a second screen. The cinema closed in the 1990s when the London-based owners uncovered fraudulent activity taking place there. They considered the theatre a liability and the final film was shown in August 1993, despite being full. Visited with @SpiderMonkey
  7. Opening in 1936 the Danilo Cinema had seating for 1,250 people and was the most luxurious available at the time. The cinema opened with a single screen and small stage, and the seating was split between two levels – stalls at ground level and and a circle balcony. The cinema was decorated in an Art Deco style with simple, modern lines throughout. A lot of thought had gone into the design and layout to ensure that all seats had a clear and uninterrupted view of the screen. In August 1973 the Danilo was re-opened as three screen cinema which later became the Cannon. The circle level became one large screen and the stalls split into a further two smaller screens. The proscenium arch of the original stage can still be seen behind the current screen, however the bottom half is now cast in concrete from the creation of the lower two screens. The cinema closed in 1993. The lower levels were converted and used as a bar called All Bar Sports from 1998 until 2004, unfortunately loosing the two smaller screens. The building has been out of use ever since and is now starting to suffer decay and water ingress. Visited with @SpiderMonkey 1. External 2. Main auditorium 3. Side view 4. Read of auditorium 5. View from back 6. Decaying seats 7. View from stage 8. Entrance to auditorium 9. Entranceway 10. The proscenium arch of the old state. The lower half was set in concrete during the creation of the lower two screens. 11. Rear of the cinema screen 12. Projector seats 13. No projectors left in the projector room 14. A Nevelector. Always a joy to shoot. 15. Entrance foyer 16. Steps from upper lobby 17. The upper lobby 18. Sports bar
  8. History; The Futurist was the 12th largest capacity theatre in the country being able to seat 2,155 people. It is a theatre and a cinema based in Scarborough, on the sea front of South Bay. Futurist closed in 2014 on the 6th of January due to the operator's lease expiring. The theatre was built in 1921 and remained the same until 1958 when the theatre was extended to allow live performers at the location. In the 1980's Scarborough Council took over the theatre and handed the lease to Apollo Leisure who then ran the theatre till 2002! In December 2002 the operator of the nearby cinema, Hollywood Plaza took over the theatre and refurbished it, installing new projectors and sounds systems. Until 2014 when it closed. Explore; Explored with @SpiderMonkey and @AndyK!. Whilst visiting for a weekend, we decided to go for an explore up North, which turned into 3. However, our first stop was Scarborough, early wake up call and a few hours trip we were there. After many look arounds for an easy access and trying to avoid the people in the flats next door and the homeless man sleeping just outside the main entrance we found access and we were in. This was a great explore, and even better when we found out the lights still worked after switching all the switches we could find. Unfortunatley I don't have many photo's due to my tripod being useless at the time. Stage. Seating Booth. Stand. B. Projector. Projectors. From the Top. E,D,C. One of those Generic " I'm a photographer" shots modelled by SpiderMonkey. Ad Board. Stage. Thanks for looking, ! JP.
  9. yoyoyo! whats going down kids? feels like its been ages since i fired up a report, feels like ages since id done any exploring until this last weekend to be honest, was buzzing when the fellas invited me along for the ride up north, been a boring few weeks tending to certain needs, didn't take me long long to get bored stupid of staying in doing the whole "netflix and chill" thing the kids are calling it these days. The explore. visited with @The_Raw @Maniac @elliot5200,and was mad little 24 hs of next to no sleep and exploring, you know how it goes the carlton was the second place i tagged along with those filthy southern gents for, literally in elliots case who had had an unfortunate slip in some unfortunate fresh the previous night . We pulled up and it was absolutely pissing down, a quick scout of the access turfed up a decision to pop back after a pint due to some lads unloading a PA system for the phoenix nights-esque club next door. Post pint we headed back up the road and were straight in without a hitch. Its pretty well trashed in there now, which i don't mind sometimes to be honest, can make for some interesting shots-also meant i didn't have any moral objection to booting an old football i found about in there i really like the big buggered window upstairs with all the broken lamp shades hanging about the place, found that quite a photogenic place even with its trashness, if id had more battery i would have gone for a couple more angles, have to say RAWs shot of that window with the fisheye may just have convinced me to buy a fisheye! Yeah the battery situation on my camera was not good, 1/2 a battery and still potentially 3 more locations (including the main reason for the trip) had we popped by sheff on the way home the next day. This is why there is only a few pics and a couple of phone snaps i'm afraid, there's enough pics out there already on the place i'm sure. so yeah all in i enjoyed the carlton, would have liked more battery on my bloody camera but hey ho. Opened on 9th September 1928 with the silent film “Lonesome Ladiesâ€. The Carlton Picture Theatre in Anlaby Road was designed by the firm of Blackmore & Sykes and was built by Messrs. Greenwood and Sons. It was run by Hull Picture Playhouse Ltd. This was a lavish suburban cinema, with an elaborate green and gold sliding dome utilising Venetian glass and housing hundreds of concealled lights. Roman marble mosaics and painted plaster panels on the walls added to the sense of occasion engendered by a trip to the flicks. A Fitton & Haley organ was installed, but this was later removed to the more central Cecil Theatre and was destroyed when that theatre was bombed during WW II. The cinema had two entrances, one in each of the two towers on the front corners of the building. Above the proscenium was the inscription (rather inapt given how soon “talkies†arrived) “A Picture is a poem without wordsâ€. There was a single balcony and, for its date, a surprisingly large car park. It continued unaltered (save for minor war damage) until its closure in April 1967, after which it was simply converted to bingo usage which continued as a Mecca Bingo Club until 2008. phone snaps cam paps sorry its a bit unthorough, really need to keep on top of my batteries a bit better! thanks for looking kids
  10. The Carlton Picture Theatre was designed by the firm of Blackmore & Sykes and was built by Messrs. It was run by Hull Picture Playhouse Ltd and opened on 9th September 1928 with the silent film “Lonesome Ladies”. The cinema had two entrances, one in each of the two towers on the front corners of the building. Above the proscenium was the inscription “A Picture is a poem without words”. This was a lavish suburban cinema, with an elaborate green and gold sliding dome utilising Venetian glass and housing hundreds of concealed lights. The walls were decorated with Roman marble mosaics and painted plaster panels. A Fitton & Haley organ was installed, but this was later removed to the more central Cecil Theatre and was destroyed when that theatre was bombed during WWII. It continued unaltered (save for minor war damage) until its closure in April 1967, after which it was simply converted to bingo usage which continued as a Mecca Bingo Club until 2008. This was a last minute addition to a trip oop north with @Maniac, @Merryprankster and Elliot5200, thanks to @ACID-REFLUX for some helpful info. As we arrived we were put off by lots of activity outside the Phoenix Nights style club next door.... "Shabba".... so we went for a pint down the road to pass some time. We went back One More Time (79) and the coast was clear so we did a quick Duck and Dive (25), made our way inside and it was Time For Fun (41). Despite being a bit trashed the architecture was a Saving Grace (88) and the dome ceiling looked as though it were Made in Heaven (67). Anyway.....onto the pictures and some bingo lingo to go with them, most of which has no connection to the photo whatsoever! 1. Clean The Floor (54) 2. Steps (69) 3. One Score (20) 4. Ask for more (34) 5. Sunset Strip (77) 6. Top of the Shop (90) 7. Dirty Gertie (30) 8. Candy Store (54) 9. Heaven's Gate (78) 10. Straight on Through (82) 11. Nearly There (89) 12. More than Eleven (37) 13. Up to Tricks (46) 14. Down on your Knees (43) 15. Made in heaven (67) 16. Stop and Run (81) Was she worth it? (56) I think so, you've got to love that old architecture. Thanks for looking
  11. Built in 1921, the Futurist Theatre was a theatre and cinema in Scarborough, England. The large auditorium has a seating capacity of 2155 people – the twelfth largest in the UK. Originally opening as a cinema, the stage was extended in 1958 to allow live performances at the venue. The Beatles performed twice in 1963-4 and many other large shows were staged there. Then and now - how much nicer was that exterior before the cladding! The local council took over the theatre in the 1980s and leased the premises to Apollo Leisure until 2002. The lease was then taken over by the same owners of the nearby Hollywood Plaza cinema, who fully refurbished the theatre, installed new projectors, sound system and screen. By 2013 the theatre was struggling and the leaseholder pulled out. The council were unable to find another operator, forcing the Futurist to close in January 2014. Visited with SpiderMonkey and Jamie_P. The old exterior is still there, hidden behind the awful cladding.
  12. We had a few failed places but then got in this place. Nice place but smelt a bit. History - Originally called the Empire Theatre of Varieties, this theatre opened in Burnley in 1894 with capacity to seat 1935 people. Funded by the Directors of the Victoria Opera House Limited. In 1995 the building became abandoned and has rapidly deteriorated both internally and externally. In 2013 it was reported that the owners of the Empire Theatre were given 8 weeks to make emergency repairs mainly to the exterior which was thought to be at risk of partial collapse onto nearby footpaths. However it does not appear that anyone from the Lancashire Theatre Company (the registered owners) have come forward to claim ownership.
  13. Evening kids, another one from a little belgium trip a couple months back, got to admit the photos i saw of this place made it look a lot better than it actually was if i honest, was a little bit underwhelming, the projector is super cool, (especially as it has a tiny bit of film in it!) and the place is weirdly photogenic in places but given its well in the middle of some sort of restoration the place just hasn't got much feeling left in it unfortunately, explore wise was a fairly average access, bit of a climb and a bit of duck and cover, not much really to say about the explore inside, anyone going in be careful on the stage holey shit its holey. The Cinema-Theatre Varia was built in 1913 and designed by architect E. Claes. Closed in 1986, the particular facade and roof structure were listed as historic monument in 1992. Renovation started end of 2004 but was recently cancelled by lack of funds (roof and windows was reinforced and sealed to prevent any further damage). aaaand a rather short, rather dark and dingey set of photogrpahics thanks for looking kids, play safe n take it sleazy
  14. History The Futurist Cinema and Theatre, which can be found in Scarborough, was constructed and fully competed in 1921. Originally it functioned exclusively as a cinema, up until 1958 when its stage area was extended to provide live performances; Shirley Bassey, The Beatles and Ken Dodd were some of the notable acts. In later years, as the site expanded, it also absorbed the adjacent Arcadia Theatre and this was developed into a lounge area. By the 1980’s, Scarborough Borough Council assumed control of the venue and thereafter it was leased to Apollo Leisure Ltd. who ran it until 2002. In December 2002, Barrie C. Stead, the owner of Hollywood Plaza Cinema, bought the Futurist Theatre and refurbished it; installing new projectors, a CinemaScope screen and a DTS sound system. The Futurist, however, closed on 5th January 2014 because a report conducted by the local council suggested that the site was “beyond the point of refurbishmentâ€. The council is now marketing the entire site for redevelopment. Inside, the Futurist Theatre has a large auditorium with a deep circle, and it is supported on twelve individual columns. In addition to these features, there is also a raised gallery which is divided into separate boxes. The ceiling is divided into two sections which are split by a wide arch: the front part is original with an elliptical dome containing three ornamental ventilation grilles, while the second, which dates from 1968, is much more basic. Finally, there is a deep wide stage with a full tower and counterweight sets. In October 2014, the BBC reported that Flamingo Land placed a bid to purchase the Futurist Theatre. If successful, the developers intend to demolish the site to make way for a rollercoaster, botanical gardens and a magical cave-themed attraction. The proposed name for this new attraction is ‘Flamingo Land Coast’. Although campaigners have petitioned to save the 1920’s Futurist Theatre, no further decisions have been publically released. Our Version of Events It was 1am (ish) one random week day when we found ourselves inside a car travelling towards Scarborough. Up front, the conversation was rather philosophical (trying to fathom the nature of reality, and that sort of stuff), while those in the back were enjoying a quick bevvy. Outside though, the exhaust was beginning to fall off, and the temperature… Well, that was pretty chilly. Nevertheless, we managed to survive the conversation and, although the car began to emit sounds similar to those of a tank, the exhaust didn’t completely fall off. So, in the end we made it to Scarborough ready and eager to explore. After taking in a bit of good old sea air, a quick look around and fucking about on a roof for a while we managed to find our way inside. The air was immediately incredibly stale and there was a bit too much asbestos for my liking, and if you’re not careful in the dark you can easily fall through the ceiling, but we carried on, and, suddenly, we were inside an almost working theatre. For once, I mused, I could sit wherever I fancied, without the Odeon Ticket Inspector watching to ensure that I sit in the inferior chair I’ve been allocated; not the more sophisticated seating that’s always towards the rear of the auditorium. In fact, by my recollection, all of the seats were exactly the same, which to me seems like a reasonably equal way of organising things. That aside, on the whole the Futurist is absolutely huge, and it takes a long time to get around the whole building – when we eventually decided to leave the sun was already beginning to rise over the seafront. But, since all of the electrics work, finding your way around the cinema becomes more or less straightforward once you begin to gather your bearings. Explored with Ford Mayhem and Deems. 1: The projector 2: Cupboard in projector room 3: Other side of the projector 4: Smaller projector 5: Cream sherry 6: Standing in the upper gallery boxes 7: The main auditorium 8: Which seat is mine? 9: Light filter machine 10: Top boxes 11: Main corridor at the rear of the auditorium 12: Heading down the stairs 13: Just another row or two 14: The Secret Life of Walter Mitty 15: The decorative ceiling 16: Ice cream stand 17: The chiller room 18: Schweppes soda water 19: Bar area and Wizard of Oz cardboard advertisement 20: The single mysterious chair 21: Managerial office 22: Backstage machinery 23: Backstage pass 24: Side view of main auditorium 25: Planes 26: Leaflets in the bar 27: View from the rear of the auditorium 28: The backroom 29: The Futurist Theatre and Cinema
  15. Day 2 of the 'Tour Di Bastardi' and after ramming some croissants, coffee and that pre packed dry bread/toast stuff down our necks, Darbians, Masa and myself kicked off proceedings with a MASSIVE want of mine... Cant think of any better way of spending a glorious Italian summers morning than wandering around a sprawling, dusty, rotten hospital site... Rather picture heavy but hey... I don't care! ... As always, thankyou please for looking
  16. Visited this one with telf. Gronk and woopashoopaa was a nice little explore but be warned the floors here are like walking on memory foam matress. Managed to cover the whole theatre and up onto the roof. The a box of section at the back of the theatre that had benches that looked really old. The theatre was really dark so struggled for light. So here's a few I did get they not the best and a little history.. Bingo moved out of the theatre in 1995, and it was statutory listed Grade II in February 1996. By 1997 the disused upper level already showed signs of fairly extensive water penetration. The more immediate risk seemed, however, to be that it would be sold for some highly profitable non-theatre activity, removing a splendid building from any prospect of a return to its designed use. There was much local pressure to reopen the theatre and the local authority and The Theatres Trust contributed to the cost of a feasibility study. However, the theatre remained empty and unused. There are now serious fears of possible demolition as a result of neglect. The theatre's frontage is somewhat obscured by an adjacent development and it is only the rear of the auditorium which has a public face. This is narrow and rendered, with evidence of original mouldings and panels. Its main entrance is on St James’s Street, a shopping street. A long and narrow entrance and foyer lead to the auditorium. The frontage is clad in sheet panelling. The auditorium is elaborately detailed with robust and richly formed plasterwork in the Classical style. As reconstructed by Crewe in 1911, it has two slightly curved wide and deep balconies, terminating in superimposed stage boxes framed between massive Corinthian columns supporting a deep cornice. Segmental-arched proscenium, with richly decorated spandrels and heraldic cartouche. Side walls feature plaster panels, pilasters and drops. Flat, panelled ceiling with circular centre panel and central sun burner. Restrained heraldic and Greek plasterwork on balcony and box fronts. Three boxes and the upper balcony have been partitioned off. If the theatre was to be restored to use, the narrow stage would need to be extended and front of house would need improvement. In May 2013, the council considered the building to be dangerous, requiring demolition and works to ensure safety. Few roof shots
  17. Lovely art deco cinema tucked away in sunny south brum, this was the second time i tried this place, first time was a fail but its not too far from me so it was only a matter of time until it happened. pain in the bum of a place to light up, light comes tearing through the few windows that are in this place and makes for very uneven lighting, should really learn to layer different exposures but hey ho. bit of history The Royalty Cinema was opened on 20th October 1930 with Maurice Chevalier in "The Love Parade". It was built for and operated by the local independent Selly Oak Pictures Ltd. The Royalty Cinema was taken over by the Associated British Cinemas(ABC) chain in March 1935. ABC closed the cinema on 2nd November 1963 with Cliff Robertson in "P.T.109". It was converted into a Mecca Bingo Club, and in 2010 it is operating as a Gala Bingo Club. In the summer of 2011, the Royalty Cinema was designated a Grade II Listed building by English Heritage. n 2012 police raided the cinema and discovered that the attic was being used as a cannabis factory. 40 plants were found, together with 10-15 kilos of dried cannabis leaves. the royalty has been empty since the raid. picture time thanks for looking, have fun and stay safe kids.
  18. I still wanted to visit this place before demolition, so last week we drove here to found quite a thrashed theatre, but with some nice light inside. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9
  19. The abandoned blue theatre also know as the CCCP Hospital, is a sizeable derelict Russian hospital complex located somewhere in Germany. Despite there being a lot more to this place we focused on the largest building which housed the operating theatres. Based on some of the murals on the wall it would appear that at least the upstairs of the building was used for treating children. After making our way inside the building we split off into 3 groups to try and locate the theatre and to check the place for any other interesting features. After an hour or so of searching we finally discovered it… next door to the room we entered when we first made our way inside! Sadly the main theatre light had gone but the chair remained so there were still a couple of shots to be had . Other than the theatre, the murals both on the external walls and the ones featuring the theatre lights inside were both pretty interesting to shoot. I wish we’d had a bit more time to explore some of the other buildings as I’m sure this place probably has a lot more to offer. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Thanks for checking out the post, there are higher resolution copies available along with a few more shots on my blog: http://www.proj3ctm4yh3m.com/urbex/2014/11/12/urbex-cccp-hospital-aka-blue-theatre-hospital-germany-july-2014/
  20. The first attempt to visit it two years ago failed. This summer again eight hours of driving and arrival in the middle of the night in the pouring rain. But it was worth it. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  21. Well-known location, however rather run down compared to older photo sets I remember. We didn't spend much time there, which annoys me even more, because as seen in the other thread, there's a glorious entrance that was missed. Anyway, here's the haul... Theatre Jeusette by cerealbawx, on Flickr Theatre Jeusette by cerealbawx, on Flickr Theatre Jeusette by cerealbawx, on Flickr Theatre Jeusette by cerealbawx, on Flickr Theatre Jeusette by cerealbawx, on Flickr Theatre Jeusette by cerealbawx, on Flickr Theatre Jeusette by cerealbawx, on Flickr (This may look misplaced, but it's the stairs up to the old projection room.) Theatre Jeusette by cerealbawx, on Flickr Theatre Jeusette by cerealbawx, on Flickr
  22. Greetings OS, me again. Just got back from an ace tour with AndyK, Kriegaffe and a non-member. We also met up with Vals Darkroom for the weekend (Nice to meet you ) We visited some sweet locations and although this one has been a bit trashed it's still a nice place with a fair bit to offer Not a lot of history here but it seems as though this theatre was part of a complex of leisure facilities as there are a few other bits connected to it like a gym which has been bricked off from the theatre now.Enjoy: Cheers
  23. Evening all, Part of our trip in August to Bulgaria to visit Buzludzha, we visited this old theatre. No history found but a nice explore while waiting for the coach parties to leave the mountain and the roadblocks to be lifted. Thanks for looking in.
  24. Hôpital Plaza - 2014

    Hey again. Slowly getting on with these Euro reports! Here is another lovely one but from France this time, I loved it here mostly because of the chapel and the theatre parts. There were also some nice stone corridors. From what i read up it was originally a seminary and later on during WWII it was turned into an ex-servicemens hospital. Some original features from the seminary remain, like the chapel. That's about all i can find on the place. Inside the theatre is a cool print of the Bayeux tapestry at the back of the room too. Enough blabbering.. PICS:
  25. Hey again! Visited this one with Goldie, feel really lucky to have done it at this time because many people soon after found it sealed and completely inaccessible. Beauty of a place but at the same time a death trap.. Dry rot central! Only certain areas i could get to to take photos for fear of falling through the floor, doesn't seem long until it fully collapses! History 'n' bits: The Theatre opened on Monday the 29th of October 1894 with a variety show and could originally seat 1,935 people. In 1909, it was taken over by James Pringle and films were then part of the programme. The auditorium was reconstructed in 1911, to the plans of noted theatre architect Bertie Crewe and seating increased to 1,808. Re-opening on 11th September 1911, it then remained the leading theatre in Burnley until 1930. The Empire Theatre was closed in June 1955, but reopened under the independent Buxton Cinemas chain in December 1955. Sold to the Star Cinemas chain in December 1958, it became a bingo club in the mid-1960’s, when the bingo operation was transfered from the nearby Palace-Hippodrome Theatre. The Empire Theatre was designated a Grade II Listed building by English Heritage in 1996. In 2011, the building still stands unused. The future of one of Burnley’s most historic theatres is under threat after falling into a “dangerous†state. The former Empire Theatre in St James’s Street needs urgent repair work carrying out on the crumbling Victorian structure. Council officials have erected safety fencing around the Grade II listed building which has been named in the Theatre Trust’s top 10 at risk theatres in Britain since 2006. The “unknown†owners have been issued with a court summons over the condition of the property which officials papers said was “dangerous and requiring part demolition and works to ensure safety.†Sadly not many shots here.. will probably add some when i have time! Thanks for looking.
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