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Found 13 results

  1. After the successful visit at tonedale main mill it was time to head up the road for the dye house. This place was fantastic and I could have spent all day in here. The machinery in here was just beautiful, traditional old machinery that is just untouched apart from the nature taking over it. Was it worth the five hour journey to see the two sites? Most certainly was, tonedale was one of my favourite explores over the two sites and holds a special place in my heart. Big thanks to mookster for helping me out with this.
  2. After the mega success at the nearby Tonedale Mill myself and OverArch headed down the road after a quick late lunch. I had been to this fantastic place twice previously but it was Mr. OverArch's first visit and I think he enjoyed it quite a lot. Even though a lot more graffiti has appeared inside and it's all looking a little bit more tired than I remember from my first visit, I never tire of shooting this place. It deserves it's place in UE folklore as one of the best ever. All shot handheld with my 30mm prime lens, a piece of kit I really should use more often. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157651875818383
  3. Second time down here (And a 3rd trip planned) as its my type of place. Went to Tone Dale the first time but didn't think what was left was worth the hassle of getting in and my new sparing partner just wanted to go here anyway. As I said I really like this place and we even found a hidden place I missed the first time, it looked like a rain forest and the colours were brilliant, shame my photos don't show it in its full glory. Full set here as normal https://www.flickr.com/photos/cunningplan/sets/72157646143568375/ Cheers
  4. Ever since I first stepped foot in Tone Mills in February 2012 I had wanted to get back there so badly but the opportunity never presented itself until now unfortunately. Me and Landie/Punto Man headed off down here as the first part of what was to be a pretty interesting and frustrating few days of explores covering a large portion of England in the process. Anyway we were in and as this was a revisit for me I decided to give my new Sigma 30mm lens it's first proper try out in a location, so some experimentation was required and I'm sure I'll get the hang of it soon enough More here http://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157642224179933/
  5. This is only just down the road from Tonedale, but what a difference between the sites. I have seen photos of this place and it doesn't look that big but its like a Tardis in there. We parked up and with a very tight squeeze we were in, but this was only a smallish dark room with a drying machine and a office upstairs. In the dark places I was doing 30 sec exposures and light painting to get the shots. At this point I though we were done but my nephew (HT from now on) shouted he had found a "Rabbit hole" (Big rabbit but still another tight squeeze) into the main factory floor. I spent a hour in here while HT looked around for more. I had just packed everything away and was heading out a door when HT grabbed me and took me into another big building full of good stuff , I only took my camera back out and did this section hand held. After this was finished he took me to what must have been where some one had set up a garage and spray shop in the past, not a lot in here but junk. As normal, full set here http://www.flickr.com/photos/100221036@N06/sets/72157641714234595/
  6. Had this one my to do list for a couple of years now but it did not really grab me until I saw the stunning green Coner machines which prompted me to get my ass in gear and drive down to check them out. Similar to Perjury-S I saw all the CCTV so we proceeded with caution. Taking a long route through the site we thought we'd sneaked our way past. While we discussed which building to search in I looked up to see we were standing 15 feet and direct in line with a new looking CCTV camera . Not much we could do but smile for the cameras and press on :-)
  7. Evening all, As promised, the second part of the report and the main Tone Mill. First report here http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/showthread.php/6563-Tone-Mills-Dyeworks-Part-1-2013 Still pouring it down, still only 10am and muddy everywhere, we left Martyn sleeping in my car (as he came to mine straight off a night shift) and made our way over to Tone. Bit of a climb involved on this one but we managed to get in and made our way to the only floor worth doing. Loved this area and the machinery. On with the photos. Thanks for looking in.
  8. Evening all, This report covers the first part of Tone Mills - the dyeworks. Not all the photos so far but a good mix for the report...... Visited here with 2 non members and camerashy on a very rainy and muddy morning. For me and Martyn, it was about 80 minutes in the car but for the 2 Marks, it was about 4 hours to get down and the same back. Tone Mills is a complete water-powered cloth finishing works, established by the Fox Brothers and Co at the confluence of the River Tone and the Back Stream and dates from 1830. The remains of the water wheel remain in-situ and so too do all the line shafting and gearing. The Mill later had an electric motor installed to supplement the water-wheel during times of drought, although the water wheel continued to be used for many decades after. Put simply the mill comprises of a number of key areas to accommodate the various stages of production: A Fulling area, where wet cloth was dried, scoured, cleaned and milled to the desired finish. A dying room, adjacent to the fulling area which specialised in producing an indigo colouring. Reservoirs and Sluice gates, to manage the flow of water into the wheel chamber. The wheel chamber and a later power house. The associated machinery for all the stages of production are all in-situ, making it an industrial archaeologists paradise. The works finally closed in 2000 and production was moved to a more contemporary location. The buildings and machinery are Grade II listed. The photos processed so far... More to come when I have the time. Will post some from the main mill soon. Cheers for looking in. Tim
  9. Visited one early December in 2011. I was in the area for a birthday party and popped along to visit the Mill on the way back to the big smoke of London. I was amazed all the machinery in place in the mill. All of it left in-situ and looking back to a by-gone era when Britain ruled the way for making good wool clothing! It looks like something from the turn of the industrial revolution and you could imagine workers slaving away here! Water mill works, big machinery, chimneys and history being a Grade 2 listed site. What else could you want?! This visit was more of a flash explore before heading home to avoid the traffic. Pictures:
  10. Explored with therealindianajones and luke,
  11. This was our last stop after a night underground and it really was as good as we had hoped,Didnt spend as much time in the older parts due to time and battery's on 2 out of 3 cams nearly failing Thanks to Styru for a few pointers and then for turning up behind me scaring the shit out of me! visited With Obscurity and John.. Borrowed history... Tone Mills is a complete water-powered cloth finishing works, established by the Fox Brothers and Co at the confluence of the River Tone and the Back Stream and dates from 1830. The remains of the water wheel remain in-situ and so too do all the line shafting and gearing. The Mill later had an electric motor installed to supplement the water-wheel during times of drought, although the water wheel continued to be used for many decades after. Put simply the mill comprises of a number of key areas to accommodate the various stages of production: A Fulling area, where wet cloth was dried, scoured, cleaned and milled to the desired finish. A dying room, adjacent to the fulling area which specialised in producing an indigo colouring. Reservoirs and Sluice gates, to manage the flow of water into the wheel chamber. The wheel chamber and a later power house. The associated machinery for all the stages of production are all in-situ, making it an industrial archaeologists paradise. The works finally closed in 2000 and production was moved to a more contemporary location. The buildings and machinery are Grade II* listed. Tone Mill in Wellington is the last woollen mill in the West Country, with a priceless collection of original machinery still in place in the wet finishing works. On with probably a few too many pics and sorry for the 50mm in some shots i got caried away Really sorry about the amount of pics but the place is a little treasure trove of industrial decaying beauty
  12. UK Tone Mills, Somerset. Feb '13

    TONE MILLS ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Tone Works was the dyeing and finishing works established by Fox Brothers and Co of Tonedale Mills, Wellington, at the confluence of the River Tone and the Back Stream . The site is shown on the Tithe map of 1839, and the works was enlarged and altered over the next 80 years. In 1912 the site was described as having ' perhaps the largest Indigo Dye House in England' The site continued in production until the 1990's. Tone Works is a near- complete example of a C19 cloth dyeing and finishing works, which developed between c.1830 and c.1920. It retains all of the component structures associated with the dyeing and finishing of worsted and woollen cloths, together with the machinery and fittings required for those processes Tone Works in its present form is an exceptional survival in a national context, not only for the completeness of the building complex , but also for the survival of its machinery, water management system and power generation plant. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Sometimes you visit a site which is like stepping back in time. This is one of those places! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Ta for looking...
  13. Stopped off here on the way back from a Birmingham day trip what a stunning site and well worth the detour hope you enjoy the photos Tone Mill in Wellington is the last woollen mill in the West Country, with a priceless collection of original machinery still in place in the wet finishing works. The site is of European significance. The Prince's Regeneration Trust created The Tone Mill Partnership drawing together local people with an active interest in finding a sympathetic and economically viable new use for the site. Together we are continuing to develop plans that will restore the Grade II* listed woollen mill buildings as a working mill that can also be visited by the public. Tone Mill is a listed group of industrial buildings that date from the 18th and 19th Centuries. The site played an important role in the cloth industry in Wellington until the late 20th Century, here the woven cloth was dyed and finished and there is an exceptional amount of surviving machinery that illustrates the way the buildings were used and how the manufacturing process worked. There is no better or more intact example in England of a traditional wet-finishing works. Conservation and reuse of these important historic buildings will bring new jobs to Wellington and will provide an exciting visitor attraction. The mill buildings are redundant and at risk and are now the subject of a planning application for conversion. Our project would enable a long-established local business to return to the site and operate the machinery in the traditional way. The Partnership commissioned an Options Appraisal that has evaluated potential heritage-led uses which include providing public access. The Prince's Regeneration Trust continues to work with The Partnership towards its aim of acquiring the site and is optimistic that a successful heritage project can be delivered.
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