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Found 13 results

  1. USA Abandoned Pioneer Town

    Hey All, I recently took a trip to the middle of the California desert to see an old abandoned movie set. While I was there I shot a video of the things that transpired. Be sure to check it out. A link with more information on the site is in the description of the video. I hope you enjoy, Anthony
  2. Defo one for this section
  3. I didn't even know this place existed until today so it was nice to see something a little different, although there is something inherently sad about an abandoned sports ground. Kettering Town FC played at the Rockingham Road grounds from 1897 to 2011 although from 1992 they only leased the stadium after having to sell it to save the club from extinction. After some much trickier than anticipated access we were in and it was a pretty chilled wander, although being surrounded by houses on two sides and a business on a third side we were always aware that some nosey neighbour might spot us and call the police... All was fine until we came to exit! We wanted an easier way out than the difficult way in so opted for a different route which brought us out by the restaurant place next door. We didn't realise that at the moment the first of us got back over, there was an employee from the restaurant standing right there having a fag break! Me and Landie man were still in the site and heard the voices, and by the time I realised what was going on I was straddling the top of the fence - which is where I promptly became stuck, like an idiot. The matey previously stood there having a quiet fag said to wait a second and out he popped from the fire exit with a ladder!! So me and Landie used the ladder to get down and as Landie steps foot on it, a police car pulls into the car park. So now we think oh great some busybody called it in and sure enough the first question was 'what are you lads doing?' so I approached the officer and said simply that we were just taking photos and were now leaving, to which she nodded and then asked us if we'd seen a little girl who had been lost, their original call out was in relation to the girl and had nothing to do with us at all! A slightly surreal end to the day by any stretch of the imagination. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157650429976296/
  4. Good Morning all! This was the first stop on our little up North tour. 20 hour round trip and no sleep! This was a nice little place, been on my list for a few years now but never really decided to go and visit until now. Access is one of the funniest I have ever encountered and we bumped into a few other explorers in there but I didn't catch ya names! History: Sheffield Old Town Hall stands on Waingate in central Sheffield, England, opposite Castle Market. The building was commissioned to replace Sheffield's first town hall, which had opened in 1700 to a design by William Renny. This first structure stood by the parish church, on a site with little prospect for extension. The Old Town Hall was built in 1807–8 by Charles Watson, and was designed to house not only the Town Trustees but also the Petty and Quarter Sessions. The initial building was a five-bay structure fronting Castle Street, but it was extended in 1833 and again in 1866 by William Flockton (1804–1864) of Sheffield and his partner for the project, Abbott; the most prominent feature was the new central clock tower over a new main entrance that reoriented the building to Waingate. At the same time, the building's courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the neighbouring Sheffield Police Offices. Waingate in 1857: the Old Town Hall with its first clock tower on the left The first Town Council was elected in 1843 and took over the lease of the Town Trustees' hall in 1866. The following year, the building was extensively renovated, with a clock tower designed by Flockton & Abbott being added. By the 1890s, the building had again become too small, and the current Sheffield Town Hall was built further south. The Old Town Hall was again extended in 1896–97, by the renamed Flockton, Gibbs & Flockton, and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 to present, the building remains disused. In 2007, it was named by the Victorian Society as one of their top ten buildings most at-risk. Thanks for looking!
  5. The town was founded in 1642 . Destroyed by an earthquake and then abandoned by the inhabitants in 1968 . Inside the houses there were still a lot of ornate ceiling paintings. However, I have not set foot in a number of buildings, because sometimes it was too uncertain for me because of the danger of collapse. However, I was there for several hours and many photos were taken due to the size of the ghost town. So - sorry for the variety. But I can not decide for individual images ... 1 - The former market place. 2 - Stairs to the upper town. 3 - Wonderful ceiling paintings inside a (from the outside inconspicuous looking) house. 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 - View from the marketplace to the main street of the village. 12 - Statue at the marketplace. 13 - One of several churches. 14 15 - The main street. 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 - It decays more and more ... 28 - The ruins of the theater. 29 30
  6. Evening all, As you already know from my previous Chernobyl village report, I was part of a 35 man group which went in April. Part of the trip was two full days mooching in Pripyat which is the main objective for anyone especially with access to buildings too. We were basically taken here and left to wander around for over 2 hours which was plenty for such a massive complex. I'm sure on revisit I will find more rooms I didn't get to see. Part of day one was a visit to Hospital 126 (MSCh 126) which is a large hospital based at the North end of Priypat. The basement contains liquidators uniforms which are highly radioactive. On this note, it is not recommended to go into the basement for this reason alone. The hospital is a vast complex occupying the largest part of the first micro-district of Pripyat. The building is adorned with huge letters on its roof that read: “health of a people - riches of the countryâ€Â. It was at this hospital on the 26th April 1986 that the first victims of the disaster were delivered by ambulance: firemen and personnel of the Chernobyl Powerplant. The majority of those had already received deadly doses of external and internal radiation also having severe skin burning from beta radiation. After such doses, most did not survive; they still stood up, tried to joke about it but the days or even hours of their lives were already numbered. Hospitals are not a cheery place to be but this one was full of dereliction, dark corridors, doors slamming with the wind. Ghosts of the past still haunting this building. The victims stayed here less than a day; were then transported to Kiev, and then by plane to Moscow. Everybody, except engineer Shashenok, died in hospital, he was the first one to die in the night of April, 26th. There were 6 firemen, 22 powerplant workers who died of sharp radiation sickness in the 6th radiological clinic of Moscow in the course of several months after the initial disaster. Named for the nearby Pripyat River, Pripyat was founded on 4 February 1970, the ninth nuclear city in the Soviet Union, for the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. It was officially proclaimed a city in 1979, and had grown to a population of 49,360 before being evacuated a few days after the 26 April 1986 Chernobyl disaster. Though Pripyat is located within the administrative district of Ivankiv Raion, the abandoned city now has a special status within the larger Kiev Oblast (province), being administered directly from Kiev. Pripyat is also supervised by Ukraine's Ministry of Emergencies, which manages activities for the entire Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Access to Pripyat, unlike cities of military importance, was not restricted before the disaster as nuclear power stations were seen by the Soviet Union as safer than other types of power plants. Nuclear power stations were presented as being an achievement of Soviet engineering, where nuclear power was harnessed for peaceful projects. The slogan "peaceful atom" (Russian: ?????? ????, mirnyj atom) was popular during those times. The original plan had been to build the plant only 25 km (16 mi) from Kiev, but the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, among other bodies, expressed concern about it being too close to the city. As a result, the power station and Pripyat were built at their current locations, about 100 km (62 mi) from Kiev. After the disaster the city of Pripyat was evacuated in two days. On with the photos 1. Front foyer at main entrance to the Hospital 2. Maternity ward and wards close by 3. 4. 5. 6. Staff social club - complete with moss carpet 7. 8. 9. Iron lung 10. 11. 12. Details 13. Corridors 14. 15. 16. Visiting hours 17. Various chairs 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. Plant life More to process but this is the main jist of what I wanted to put on here. Cheers for looking in
  7. Originally a court house then later on changed to a town hall. The outside holds a lot of promise from the front it looks like a castle! Sadly not as good inside but well worth a visit. 1 2 3 4 5 You really do bump into allsorts out exploring 6
  8. I travelled up to York for a wedding last week so decided to make the most of my time oop north and spent a couple of days in Sheffield. I visited the courts with Acid- Reflux who was kind enough to revisit the place on my behalf. Seeing as I had my suit with me I figured it would be rude if I didn't wear it in court. The policeman's hat was a last minute idea I had as I walked past a fancy dress shop the day before. Credit goes to Acid- Reflux for taking those shots I have to say this place is pretty spectacular, it's unbelievable to see all those beautiful mahogany court rooms and that staircase laying to waste. We were surprised to be the only visitors for the duration, I realise a lot of people have reported on this spot recently so I hope my take on it adds something a bit different. The History: Sheffield Old Town Hall stands on Waingate in central Sheffield, England, opposite Castle Market. The building was commissioned to replace Sheffield's first town hall, which had opened in 1700 to a design by William Renny. This first structure stood by the parish church, on a site with little prospect for extension. The Old Town Hall was built in 1807–8 by Charles Watson, and was designed to house not only the Town Trustees but also the Petty and Quarter Sessions. The initial building was a five-bay structure fronting Castle Street, but it was extended in 1833 and again in 1866 by William Flockton (1804–1864) of Sheffield and his partner for the project, Abbott; the most prominent feature was the new central clock tower over a new main entrance that reoriented the building to Waingate. At the same time, the building's courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the neighbouring Sheffield Police Offices. The first Town Council was elected in 1843 and took over the lease of the Town Trustees' hall in 1866. The following year, the building was extensively renovated, with a clock tower designed by Flockton & Abbott being added. By the 1890s, the building had again become too small, and the current Sheffield Town Hall was built further south. The Old Town Hall was again extended in 1896–97, by the renamed Flockton, Gibbs & Flockton, and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 to present, the building remains disused. In 2007, it was named by the Victorian Society as one of their top ten buildings most at-risk (most at risk of becoming the most over-explored building in the UK perhaps?). Exterior Cell block Court Rooms It was him.... It wasn't me.... The Stairs Other bits and pieces Clock Tower
  9. I dont know if this post should go here, because it include a house/ post office and cemetery..... Please forgive me if this is the wrong location. These are unwatermarked because they were taken kind of in a hurry on a really chilly day. This is the town i mention in a previous post... Or whats left of it (chopper...) anyway. This is the only remaining structure of a small town called Union Valley. it is literally out in the middle of nowhere. I dont have alot of information on the town itself. But this house and a cemetary are all that remain. The only thing anyone knows about Union Valley is that this house was not only a house, but the post office in its time. The person who granted us permission to go to the house did tell us it has been standing for a hundred plus years. So it has seen some history! I dont recall it having any modern fixtures like lights or anything, but maybe it did... I dont know for sure. So here are some of the photos of the H/PO and the Cemetery. (The image above i included mainly to show that awesome brickwork around the window. At least i think its awesome...) (I dont know why that "fencing" was around that front porch, unless at one time it was used a chicken coop. Which wouldn't be unlikely) (dont know what the creepy hole was.... It was full of dirt.... we think it was an old crawl space) (an old "half" barn) (and here is the cemetary) (it says Union Valley Cemetery. Off to the left it says Gurley {another small town that you can see from the back of the cemetery} Bicentennial Committee May 31, 1976. and off to the right it says Cemetery established 1899) There were alot of babies and children in this cemetery. I dont know if there was a series of flu or what.... And there are several headstones the earth seems to be "eating"..... We do know the cemetery was used up until 2000... (Birth: may 22 1866. Death: March 21 1923) (1901-1911) (death june 28 1916) (sorry about the poor quality and the number of pictures! Dont hate on me to bad!)
  10. .. couldn't believe my luck when a fellow exploring buddy said he’d found a way into this place…so on a cold, wet Sunday afternoon and using the excuse that aforementioned exploring buddy had â€no-one to play with today†managed to get me out of going to a kid’s birthday party… cheers Kev ! This site is right in the centre of a certain town…all the flats are completely trashed so the only really cool bit is the central atrium. It is almost designed like a prison and must have been hell for the poor people living there! .. Given the housing crisis in this country it’s a shame the local powers that be couldn't make this place work ! We went back in the dark and made full use of the place! The central atrium The view from the top looking down to the communal courtyard They certainly were small flats ! From one end to the other Even some of the doors looked prison like! It was much more fun in the dark! Watch out for those falling sparks Curtain of fire. That’s it..we went back very recently and it is now a total wreck !
  11. Strachów, (which literally translated means; "spooky" ) is quite a suitable name for this place. Even though nowadays this place is called differently, Strachów was the official name till 1992. Strachów was a town built for the soldiers and families of the Russian Army. The whole terrain is enormous and contains over 300 buildings. Till 1992, this was quite a busy town, including everything the Russians needed in day to day life. There were stores, churches, cinemas, a train station , theaters and so on... Nowadays this area is sometimes used by the Polish army to practice. Unfortunately, just after we entered this area and climbed to the top floor of the first building, we spotted a whole lot of army vehicles, heading our way and into the area carrying a lot of very heavy artillery and soldiers. Since they obviously were going to do some training things, we decided to leave quickly because we didn't feel like ending up in the middle of their practice. To make the entrance to the site a bit more difficult, they blew up the entrance bridge, as you can see in below pics... And to simply illustrate the scale of things, the buildings you'll see on the pictures are only the first 5 or 6 buildings of the 300 in total... 1# 2# 3# 4# 5# 6# 7# 8# 9# 10# Thanks 4 watching!!
  12. An epic day sploring with SK, Ninja Kitten, Trog, Peaches, Beer Switch and Spong Ebob This building was Chingford Urban District Council's Town Hall built in 1929 on The Ridgeway. Added to in the 1960's it was used as the London Borough of Waltham Forest's Chingford Municipal Offices. Photo borrowed from Wiki as I didn't get any exteriors The building is small with an area of only 4,800 sq foot over two floors but is a real eye opener in respect of what has been left behind, a valuable mixture of old and new as you will see. The site is now on the market for £600,000, if you're interested then give Gilmartin Ley a ring http://www.gilmartinley.co.uk/propertie ... n/E4/21192 A pretty safe safe!!! The value of the office equipment left behind would make any tax payer cry These boxes were ALL full Then there was the old stuff
  13. Visited after seeing 'Sara' but more talk of her later !, as we were passing it came to my attention that i might be able to blag our way inside for a photo shoot well me and Mutilated_Pixie that is, car parked n off we popped.........got to the main stairs going to the building when we got stopped.......are you going to the beer festival !, my reply.....no were here for a photo shoot inside the building, Hmmmmm have you permission......Errrr no.....then you will need to see the caretaker, next min the caretaker comes to us I explain what we want to do and well cut a long story short this caretaker could not have been more helpful and treat us like one of the royals, guided tour and historical talk round every where within the building/clock tower/roof/court room/cells you name it boy he was up for it like BIG STYLE !!!... The Town Hall was built during the reign of Queen Victoria and the foundation stone was laid at 2.30pm on the 12th of October 1886 this building was completed in 1889 and officially opened on Tuesday the 17th September 1889 by the Mayor of the time Alderman John Walker J.P., on this day it was declared a general holiday and several brass bands played here. The Town Hall was built to cater for the towns needs including civic officers including the town clerk/schools/lighting/highways/sewerage/town planning including the police station and the courts. The site of the Town Hall was chosen to overlook the Market place which was cobbled and even had a shelter in the centre which was known as 'Cabmans Shelter' as it served as a pick up point for horse drawn carriages. Looking to the right of the entrance to the Victoria Hall are two windows the first depicts the various aspects of Dewsbury trade and the background is a detailed street map of the town centre as it was in the fifty's, the former window was destroyed in 1940 during WW2. The stained glass was something else as he explained they had cleaned these form pure black to there near original condition. The window to which this writing refers is to the foyer of the town hall and is second from the main entrance of the Victoria hall. Arms of the Lords of the Manor of Dewsbury Illustrated on the stained glass window recently placed in the new town hall, Dewsbury opened on the 17th September 1889. The window is a fine specimen of glass stainer's art and was supplied by the eminent firm of Winfield's Ltd of Birmingham. Main stairway all marble. The Judges room where he got dressed for Court. ALL RISE FOR THE REET HONOURABLE...................CAPTAIN CAVE MAN Time for a step back in time. MONDAY, JANUARY 5 1981: MURDER AND THEFT CHARGES At Dewsbury Magistrates' Court, Court Clerk Dean Gardener asked: "Are you Peter William Sutcliffe, of 6 Garden Lane, Heaton, Bradford?" After an affirmative response, he continued: "You are accused that between 16 November and 19 November 1980 you did murder Jacqueline Hill against the peace of our Sovereign Lady the Queen. Further, you are charged that at Mirfield, between 13 November and 2 January, you stole two motor vehicle registration-plates to the total value of 50p, the property of Cyril Bamforth." The County prosecuting solicitor, Maurice Shaffner, stated that Sutcliffe was not legally represented. Sutcliffe replied in the negative when asked whether he wanted reporting restrictions lifted. The hearing lasted about five minutes. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20 1981: MURDER AND ATTEMPTED MURDER CHARGES At Dewsbury Magistrates' Court, Peter William Sutcliffe was committed for trial accused of 13 murders and seven attempted murders, and transferred to Leeds Crown Court. During a 14 minute hearing, David Kyle, for the Director of Public Prosecutions, made the application for Sutcliffe's committal for trial under a procedure where an accused person can be committed for trial without oral evidence being given. The prosecution also requested, and the magistrates agreed, to the withdrawal of one charge of the theft of number plates worth 50p. Kerry Macgill, defending, accepted committal without oral evidence. He did not make any applications for bail or for the lifting of reporting restrictions. He did apply for two counsel to represent Sutcliffe at his trial. The murder charges were of: Wilma McCann, 24, of Scott Hall Avenue, Chapeltown, at Leeds, on October 30 1975; Emily Monica Jackson, 42, of Back Green, Churwell, Morley, at Leeds, on or about January 20 1976; Irene Richardson, 28, of Cowper Steet, Leeds, at Leeds, on or about February 6 1977; Patricia Atkinson, 33, of Oak Avenue, Manningham, in Bradford, on or about April 23 1977; Jayne Michelle McDonald, 16, of Scott Hall Avenue, Chapeltown, at Leeds, on June 26 1977; Jean Bernadette Jordan (Royle), 20, of Lingbeck Cresent, Hulme, Manchester, at Manchester, between September 30 1977 and October 11 1977; Yvonne Ann Pearson, 22, of Woodbury Street, Bradford, at Bradford, between January 20 and March 26 1978; Helen Maria Rytka, 18, of Elmwood Avenue, Birkby, Huddersfield, between January 30 and February 4 1978; Vera Evelyn Millward, 40, of Grenham Avenue, Hulme, Manchester, at Manchester, on or about May 16 1978; Josephine Anne Whitaker, 19, of Ivy Street, Halifax, at Halifax, on or about April 4 1979; Barbara Janine Leach, 20, of Grove Terrace, Bradford, at Bradford, between September 1 and September 4 1979; Marguerite Walls, 47, of New Park Croft, Farsley, Leeds, at Farsley, on or about August 20 1980; Jacqueline Hill, 20, of Lupton Flats, Headingley, at Headingley, Leeds, between November 16 and November 19 1980. The attempted murders charges were of: Anna Patricia Rogulskyj, 39, at Keighley, on July 5 1975; Olive Smelt, 51, at Halifax, on or about August 15 1975; Marcella Claxton, 23, at Leeds, on May 9 1976; Maureen Long, 46, at Bradford, on July 10 1977, Marilyn Moore, 28, at Leeds, on December 14 1977; Upadhya Nadavathy Bandara, 34, at Leeds, on September 24 1980; Teresa Simone Sykes, 16, at Huddersfield, on November 5 1980. TUESDAY, APRIL 14 1981: TRANSFER TO OLD BAILEY FOR TRIAL A Touch of Frost and Emmerdale have been recorded within this room and several other recording studios have hired the room at £3000 per day. Looking down the road to the cells. Time to hit the bell tower and roof shots. First a look at the original weights for the windings of the clock which sadly has been changed to motorised. Looking back down a set of stairs on the way to the bells. Time to go higher. Up on the roof. Back down for the cells. Within this cell we were told that the Urinal is about where the bed of Jack the ripper was... Lights and buzzer for the police and cells. the caretaker before we left ended up printing out 20 pages of history and gave me all the maps of the building on all floors. We can not thank him enough....top bloke !
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