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Found 17 results

  1. Dudley rail tunnel was opened in 1850 to allow the Oxford-Worcester-Wolverhampton Line between Stourbridge and Wolverhampton to pass for several hundred yards beneath Dudley. The tunnel was regularly used by passenger trains until 1964, when the town's station closed along with the remaining passenger stations on the line, although goods trains were still allowed to use the line. It finally closed to all trains on 19 March 1993, when the section of railway between Walsall and Brierley Hill was closed after 143 years in use. A cable laying train passed through the tunnel on 2 July 1993 - nearly four months after the line was officially closed. Explored with @plod and a 28DL member. Plod
  2. History Highgate Station was constructed in 1867, by the Edgware, Highgate and London Railway, in a deep cutting that was excavated from Highgate Hill. The two tunnels penetrating the hillside from either side of the station were built some years before the station itself. Highgate Station was designed so that it had two side platforms and three tracks between them. A station building was constructed to the south end of the platform, along with a covered footbridge which connected the two platforms. The entire station was rebuilt in the 1880s, and a new central platform with two tracks flanking either side was constructed. The island could be accessed via a ticket office located in the middle of the footbridge. The station was altered again in 1935, as part of the ‘Northern Heights’ project that sought to incorporate the Edgware, High Barnet and Alexandra Palace lines into the London Transport Network. The first stage of the project involved the construction of tube tunnels underneath Highgate Station. To provide an interchange between the new deep-level platforms and the existing surface platforms, a subterranean pedestrian network was built immediately beneath Highgate Station. Stairs and escalators were installed to connect the existing platforms with the new underground ones, and street entrances to the concourse were built on Archway Road and Priory Gardens. As the pedestrian footbridge was no longer required, it was demolished along with some parts of the original buildings. The remaining sections of the older buildings were redeveloped, together with the surface platforms themselves which received some minor alterations. Following World War Two, plans to improve Highgate Station were never fully completed. As other sections of London’s Railways required urgent maintenance, and were deemed more important as they were more central to the heart of the city, Highgate became less of a priority. Despite being labelled as ‘under construction’ for years on various maps, by the early 1950s passenger services at Highgate’s surface Station ceased, but freight traffic continued to pass through the station until 1964. After freight traffic ceased to operate on this section of the line, it was used only for occasional London Underground rolling stock transfers between Highgate Depot and the Northern City line; however, since it was never electrified the stock had to be pulled over the lines using battery-powered locomotives. All activity ceased on Highgate’s surface lines by 1970, due to the poor structural integrity of some of the nearby bridges. Presently, one of the original 1867 buildings still stands; this is rumoured to be used as a residential building. As for the station itself, a number of the older buildings were demolished, leaving only the 1940s structures standing. Plastic sheeting was used to cover the old track bed after the rails were removed, to prevent water from seeping into the northern lines concourse which lies below. Much of the old route between Finsbury Park and Alexandra Palace is now part of the Parkland Walk; however, this bypasses the station for health and safety reasons. Our Version of Events Getting into London by car wasn’t quite as bad as we’d imagined, but finding a spot to park was an absolute nightmare. As we toured the city for a bit, looking for somewhere to stop the car, we noticed that people seem to squeeze into any spot available; there were mere centimetres between some of them! Finally, after much searching, we found a space (thankfully) that wasn’t too far from Highgate Station. Judging by some of the cars that were parked near us, and the moss growing on their rooves, a few of them seem to have been there for a long time. Having witnessed this, we think we now understand, a bit more clearly, why there’s such a parking problem in London. Since we’d heard the station was situated in a hillside and surrounded by trees, we imagined finding it would be a bit of a challenge. As it turned out, however, we were wrong – it’s very visible. Gaining access wasn’t difficult either, which we were also surprised about given that there’s a busy station next door; we had gauged that it might be difficult to slip onto the old premises without being seen with such a high volume of people around. Once again we were mistaken in our assumption, as no one seemed to give a shit that we looked slightly suspicious milling around an abandoned site with tripods and cameras, meaning we were able to wander into the station very easily. Once onsite, even though people could probably see us quite clearly from the live station and a public footpath which runs alongside the platform, no one glanced our way; instead, everyone seemed more intent on rushing to wherever it was they were going. After a quick wander around the site it was obvious that there isn’t much there, and all of the tunnel portals are sealed, together with the additional doorway we found down the staircase on the main platform. The station itself was less impressive than it looked from old pictures we’d found of it, but it felt very odd, in a good way, being in part of the City of London that certainly didn’t feel like a city at all. Inside the small gully it was peaceful and we encountered trees and foxes – three things we never thought we’d find in the capital. The next fifteen minutes were spent taking in the quiet atmosphere and a few photographs, before we decided to head off to the next explore we had lined up. Overall, then, the site is perfect is you’re passing through the area, especially if you fancy a break from the hustle and bustle, but it’s probably not worth travelling from further afield to visit it. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do and Husky. Looking west at Highgate Station in 1868, when it first opened. Highgate Station in the 1880s, looking west, when the two side platforms were replaced. The station in the early 1940s. The old 1800s toilet block was retained and incorporated into the overall design at this point. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22:
  3. History Up on the bleak moorland, just outside the small spa town of Buxton, is Harpur Hill and its large 222 ha Health and Safety Testing Facility. Funded under the Government’s Private Finance Initiative, the £56 million laboratory was constructed back in 2002. Years ago, back in 1938, Harpur Hill was a remote RAF base that housed bunkers and an underground ammunition store; therefore, the land was found to be suitable, and still rural enough, for redevelopment into a testing facility. Presently, part of the site has been used to reconstruct a Jubilee Line, using old London Underground trains. It aims to recreate the 7/7 London Tube bombings so the safety of future carriages might be improved. The facility warns that whenever red flags are flying at designated posts around perimeter, a toxic explosion on the site is imminent. Other experiments at the site have involved crash testing trains, heating up shipping containers packed with fireworks and replicating other notable accidents. According to local rumours, although public footpaths run through the grounds of the facility, the site is closely monitored by sensors, and watched by CCTV cameras, and they observe your every move! A team of camouflaged ‘Area 51’ style guards also hide in the bushes and patrol the perimeter on half-hourly rotations. The locals say so, so it must be true. What is more, aside from normal workers, it is believed that a team of scientists live onsite; apparently, they have been sighted exercising on the grounds, but they are never allowed to leave. Finally, the old tunnels are said to still be in service, but whatever goes on down there remains a tight secret. Our Version of Events Anyone who has read our previous reports will know that for a while we rolled around in a bright orange car – not by choice we hasten to add. For this explore, though, we decided to ditch the old beast, and go for something more covert, given that this site sounded like Fort Knox. Our choice would have been a tank, to bypass the ‘Area 51’ style guards, but nowhere we know had any of those available. Instead, we had to settle for a blue car; we could only hope it would blend in with the surrounding countryside. Doing our best to look like ‘hikers’, with Peter Storm boots, plastic anoraks and a bit of tweed, we abandoned the new motor in a layby and joined the footpath that leads towards the facility. To avoid the ‘commandos’ in the bushes, we pretended to look like lost walkers, gazing hard into the sky as though we were trying to find the North Star; we hear that’s how ‘propa’ hikers navigate. Eventually, after leaving several false trails in our effort to shake the guards, we reached the perimeter fence. However, by now it was lunchtime, and being hikers we’d brought our sandwiches and Ginsters pasties with us, so it was crucial we sat down to eat them. The lukewarm flask of tea went down nicely at this point too, it’s thirsty work trying to be stealthly. After making some final adjustments to our thick woollen walking socks, we decided to orientate the map and check our bearings. A couple of pasty crumbs deceived us at first, as we thought they were buildings, but because one of us has gained our Bronze Duke of Edinburgh Award we were eventually able to spot the mistake. So, guessing we were right on the right course, we set off once again. Judging by the brown wiggly lines on the map, it looked as though the motion sensors were dead ahead. Of course, being prepared for every eventuality, we’d brought air-freshener with us to combat this obstacle. A great plume of Air Wick’s 4 in 1 Lavender scent was released in front of us as we walked; we hear that ‘pro urbexers’ do this to make motion sensor laser beams appear. Don’t worry, for those of you who are wondering, we did a couple of stretches right after we got the air freshener out, to make us supple enough for a game of Twister, and to squeeze between the beams if necessary. Several moments later, despite our tactics, security must have spotted us because a pack of scientifically altered dogs from the laboratory were on our tail. Ignoring the legendary advice that you shouldn’t run on a full stomach, we hit legs. The great steroid injected beasts were right behind us now, foaming at the mouths and growling loudly. Being prepared ‘urbexers’ though, we reached into our High Gear rucksacks and pulled out three fresh steaks – Tesco’s Finest, from some made up farm somewhere. Ford Mayhem lobbed them behind us as hard as he could manage. The trick seemed to work, as the dogs quickly stopped and devoured each other in the frenzy. The four of us, breathless after running, reached the final perimeter; it was a large 32.7 foot palisade fence with razor wire fixed on top. As we grumbled amongst ourselves, that the ‘locals’ had failed to tell us about the fence, we decided to take a break and come up with a plan. Feeling hungry once again, and knowing we had to keep our energy up, we pulled out a gas stove and a couple of Wayfayrer flat-packs (sausage and beans). An awkward silence ensued as we tucked into our meal; knowing that you might lose a testicle climbing a fence puts a bit of a downer on things… … And then we stopped daydreaming about the local rumours. In reality, there were no guards, motion sensors or any air freshener. The modified dogs weren’t real either, they were sheep, and, as far as we could tell, they weren’t modified in any way at all. Other than passing through a couple of muddy fields, reaching the underground trains was actually fairly straightforward and largely uneventful. It did feel a little odd being sat on a London Tube train with Peak District scenery in the background of course. Overall though, it was great to see and experience the site as it was interesting to see London Underground trains ‘out of context’ so to speak, and because some great work is being done here – we only wish we’d been present when they put fireworks inside a shipping container. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do and Husky. *No tweed was worn for the duration of this explore. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29:
  4. At last I get to go to visit a train graveyard! I went to Oakamoor for a look round but even the rails have been taken away from there and scrapped. (non-HD people should press the back button and look at some drains ) Anyway, just before it was dark I managed to get pictures from another location I'd seen on Google Maps. I couldn't get up onto all of the carriages because of a bad elbow at the moment I'm surprised it hasn't been sold off for scrap. It was nice to go inside a proper old fashioned passenger carriage which hadn't been vandalized in any way. First some general shots from walking around...... and my favourite carriage......
  5. It took me a while before I've finally had the time to visit this cool Train. When you step on board, it's like you're traveling back in time... Have seen a lot of repo's from it, so it's hard to be creative. Hope you enjoy it. I gave it a little authentic look. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7
  6. Explored with Raz & Rott3nW00d History By 1920 extensive railway sidings had been developed on the railway line eastsoutheast of Healey, named Healey Mill Sidings. In the 1960s, as part of a modernisation plan, the sidings were re-designed for more efficient wagon load handling. Construction included cutting a new channel over 1,000 yards long for the River Calder south of the original, levelling of the site with over 1 million cubic yards of infill, the re-construction and extension of a road bridge at the east end of the site near Horbury Bridge, the construction of three railway bridges over the River Calder, and diversion of gas and electricity mains. The new yard was built as a hump shunting (gravity) yard capable of handling 4,000 wagons a day. The reception sidings were built west of the River Calder, the main yard was built on the extended site of the former sidings. The main control tower was located south of the main line and the Calder Vale Dye Works near to the river.The yard opened in 1963 at a cost of £3.5 million. The diesel motive power depot at Healey Mills (Healey Mills Diesel Depot or Healey Mills TMD) opened in 1967. After the marshalling yard closed in 1987, the site was used for storage of trains and locomotives. After the privatisation of British Rail the site was operated by EWS; an assessment was made of a future requirement of six long doubled ended sidings and further short single ended sidings. After 2010 the site's use was limited to crew changes; the driver depot at Healey Mills closed in 2012, being relocated to portacabins at Wakefield Kirkgate station after 4 February 2012. Explore & Cildhood Memories; This is certainly not a new one for me, having spent a lot of my childhood in Ossett i was down at this rail yard clambering about as much as i could. I was really quite shocked when i arrived yesterday to find that the place had been emptied!! When i used to go down there were hundreds of carriages and loads of diesel loco's. I remember many a sunny afternoon pretending to drive this bad boys around... I also remember a lot of nettles. Anyway, whilst in the area we decided to nip down for a mooch about and although it wasnt as good as it used to be, i had a good time reliving my childhood If you got this far, thanks for looking
  7. Leeds (South) From Above

    Hello all, Few pics from above leeds on roof tops/car parks Train leaving Leeds Station Cheers for looking
  8. A lot of abandoned trains sleeping at the entrance of a huge forest.
  9. Belgium Hell Covered Train - 2015

    My repo of the "Hundekopf Train" from 1957, with devil's red upholstery. 01 02 03 04 more: https://www.flickr.com/photos/105754257@N03/sets/72157652517975439
  10. During a fantastic long weekend trip to Hungary with my close friend TBM, and after a long list of annoying failures (the secca in Budapest appears to be very good and in even the derpiest of derps, though usually fairly pleasant and accepting but insist they must let you go), we successfully explored this fantastic collection of Soviet and probably pre-soviet trains, most of them COLOSSAL! And all sadly left to rot in this Budapest depot. It was a relaxed day despite being nestled within the live grounds of a train depot, we kept to ourselves and no one seemed too bothered. I myself am not a huge trainspotter but adored this place. Some trains here have allegedly been used in Auschwitz!! Here we have it, the rotting Red Star trains of Communist Commuting. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 [ And finally…. Well it would have been rude not to when we were in an ex Soviet Union country, and many here who saw my Chernobyl report would have seen the Lada! So we rented this TWO STROKE Goddess TRABANT complete with tour guide who was able to assist with the odd column set up, and take us for some exploring! #A1 #A2 #A3 PM me for rental info, it’s cheap and fun! Anyways, more derpage at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157645948142370/
  11. Stumbled across this place by accident at the weekend I only hade my trusty phone camera with me so here is the results. Thanks for looking...
  12. For those of you who like abandoned train stations. http://matadornetwork.com/trips/abandoned-train-and-subway-stations-of-the-world-pics/
  13. Evening all, Not a Belgium one but a local place to me. Not a lot of history apart from this is the place where the local railway museum dumped locomotives, etc for restoration or scrapping. Haven't been there in a few years but maybe go back and see how much has changed. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 - one of the crew, just for fun Thanks for looking in.
  14. Wasnt going to bung a report up as it was visited with the permission of the nice men who run the site but as my previous report was a night shoot to the tunnel and a few of the trains i thought id bang one up so to speak.. Im sure ryda and various others have covered the history and tbh im not going to paste the same gumpf up! heres a little link to their site if you wana gander http://www.eastkentlightrailway.moonfruit.com/ On with some pics of a pleasant hour or so with space invader and olivergt Was a nice relaxed start to a day underground in dover..
  15. In January 1995 a small group of enthusiasts, brought together by their recognition of the rapidly approaching end of an era in travel around South London, formed a group to preserve examples of the EPB type trains. For nearly half a century these electric multiple units reliably carried millions of passengers over the Southern Electric network. The EPB Preservation Group (Company Limited by guarantee from December 1998) was born. In mid 1995 we bought BR Standard design 2 EPB [Electro Pneumatic Brake] Unit 5759 which was built at Eastleigh in 1956. It lasted until nearly the end of EPB operation being withdrawn from service on 18th January 1995. Our volunteers are now working at Shepherdswell, its home on the East Kent Railway, to restore 5759 to as near early 1960s condition as practicable. a few of the Goliath tunnel Thanks for looking
  16. Right its somehting ive been meaning to have a look at and know i have im glad i did..visited with paulk silver rainbow and space invader History has been covered a few time so im simply gunna put a link up to a site which covers it ! http://www.subbrit.org.uk/sb-sites/site ... ndex.shtml And a few of the trains before my battery died ..skool boy error didnt check if i was charged up.. And just for shitz and giggles one pic of an orb ! Was a good explore and damn cold thanks for looking!
  17. The line from Shepherdswell to Eythorne was originally going to be a line running across flat land around a small hill, however due to disagreements with a landowner, the 550 yard tunnel was excavated to make the connection between the stations. Approaching from Shepherdswell, you find yourself in quite a deep cutting, and the tunnel itself has been bored wide enough to accommodate a twin-track, however only half the chalk was excavated inside the tunnel to save on costs. The tunnel officially opened for business in 1912, and closed 75 years later in 1987. The purpose of the line was to serve the freight purposes of the local collieries in and around the area, however passengers were also conveyed between Shepherdswell on the London, Chatham & Dover Railway’s Canterbury to Dover main line, to a junction at Eastry, from whence ran lines to Richborough Port and Canterbury Road. The line from Shepherdswell to Eythorne has subsequently been reopened by a train preservation society, who in the summer months, run trains from Shepherdswell to Eythorne. The train graveyard I presume, houses the trains that the preservation society drive to Eythorne and back. Sadly, some of these trains have seen better days, with grease still covering the wheels, they stand dormant, slowly depreciating hidden out of site behind Shepherdswell Railway Station. Others still seem in useable condition, and one of the trains had scaffolding up the side of it and was getting a new lick of paint. It is nice to see some people are not letting these fine examples of transportation go to waste. I dont think I could ever forget a trip to London as a child, starting off at Dover with the sound of 40 odd doors being slammed all at once.
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