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Found 78 results

  1. Belgium Tunnel Godardville

    The Godarville tunnel was a boatunnel and has a length of 1050 meters. In order to overcome the enormous differences in height on the Charleroi-Brussels canal, many locks were built in the Samme valley between Ronquières and Seneffe and a 1267 m long tunnel was built : La Bête tunnel. Soon there was a need for a canal with a larger capacity and between 1854 and 1857 the canal was enlarged for vessels up to 350 tons. The old tunnel, however, formed a bottleneck and so it was replaced by the new tunnel of Godarville. As a result, the number of locks was limited to 30. After the Second World War it was decided to make the canal navigable for ships up to 1350 tons. Since neither the Samme nor the tunnel of Godarville could make this enlargement, a new route had to be built between Ronquières and Godarville. . The tunnel is closed with large metal gates on both sides to keep the cold out during the winter. On the south side, in the tunnel next to the canal, there is a towpath on which the horses towed the boats. Dimensions length: 1050 m width: 8 m maximum ship width: 5 m maximum draft: 2.1 m
  2. Located In Columbus Ohio. Very popular urbex place.
  3. Hello everyone. I was refereed to join the forum from the Facebook group. Im from Ohio, USA and have followed urban exploring for a while. Recently I started getting out and doing it myself. I mainly film videos and post them on youtube but I also take pictures when I'm scouting new areas. I was out the other day scouting an area and took some pictures. I'm looking forward to going back.
  4. History The Waterloo Tunnel is a 779 metre (852 yards) long disused railway tunnel in Liverpool. It opened in 1849. At its Eastern end, the Waterloo Tunnel opens into a short cutting (approximately 63 metres long) which connects to the Victoria Tunnel which is 1.536 miles (2.474 kilometres) long. Effectively, both tunnels are one long tunnel with an open-air ventilation cutting in between; however, they were given different names initially because trains in the Waterloo Tunnel were locomotive hauled while trains in the Victoria Tunnel were cable hauled. In terms of tunnel architecture, the Waterloo Tunnel features a semi-circular opening, wide enough to accommodate three separate tracks. The westernmost section has been backfilled and there are occasional accumulations of calcite on the brickwork. Most of the Waterloo Tunnel is brick-lined; however, it is not listed. The Victoria Tunnel, on the other hand, is Grade II listed. It features a rusticated arch flanked by buttresses, together with a modillioned cornice and ashlar-coped parapet. The first two-hundred yards of the tunnel are brick-arched, but after that it is unlined up to the fourth ventilation shaft. There are five visible air shafts in the Victoria Tunnel, and an additional five hidden shafts. A drain also runs down the length of the tunnel, but this has collapsed in certain places. Both tunnels were constructed because the city of Liverpool is built on a densely populated escarpment (a long, steep slope) that drops down to the River Mersey. This meant building on the surface would have been difficult without causing major disruption, but also that the landscape was ideal for the construction of a line that could be placed beneath the ground. Nevertheless, cutting both tunnels still proved to be a difficult task as care had to be taken to avoid disturbing the buildings above due to their shallow depth. The work from Byrom Street eastwards proved the most difficult and perilous and, despite efforts to excavate carefully, the soft clay in the area caused several houses to give way, rendering them uninhabitable. All the inhabitants were forced to abandon their homes at short notice. What this means is that the design of the tunnel – becoming two separate structures – was a result of circumstance. The first goods traffic travelled through the tunnels in August 1849. However, a three-foot section of Victoria Tunnel collapsed in September 1852. The collapse was quickly repaired and the tunnels were used by goods traffic without any further major incidents until 1899, when a freight train consisting of a tank, twenty-three loaded wagons and a brake van separated when a coupling between the seventh and eighth wagons fractured. Two wagons and the van were destroyed in the incident, and two of the three men aboard were killed. A train that was travelling towards the docks was also caught up in the accident as it collided with the debris and partially derailed. Although both the Waterloo and Victoria Tunnel were initially part of a freight line, they were opened to passenger traffic in 1895. Passenger services continued to run up until February 1971. Many of the large docks in Liverpool ‘dried up’ as they were affected by declining industry across the UK and this resulted in a significant decrease in traffic on the line. Both tunnels were officially closed on 19th November 1972; although, a small section of the Edge Hill line was retained as a headshunt. It is rumoured that this track is still used very occasionally today. Whether this is true or not, though, is another matter. The futures of both the Waterloo and Victoria Tunnel are uncertain. However, the Merseyrail Network have proposed to use part of them to create a connection to the low-level Liverpool Central Station. Creating the connection would reduce journey times to Edge Hill. Unfortunately, though, so far all plans have fallen through due to some local opposition and budget constraints. The last attempt to revive the line was made in 2007, driven by plans to redevelop the north shore area of Liverpool. Our Version of Events After meeting up with a couple of Liverpool based explorers, and hitting an old industrial site first, we decided to head over to the Waterloo/Victoria Tunnel. It was good to meet a couple of locals for a change because they both had an exceptional knowledge of the area – something we lack when it comes to exploring in Liverpool, unfortunately. Anyway, this saved us having to do much research and scouting for a change. So, thanks fellas! When we initially rocked up outside our chosen access point, several Network Rail guys were busy standing around a couple of shovels and one guy down a hole. Rather than leave and come back, though, we decided to sit in the car and wait for them to fuck off. Our patience paid off pretty quickly since the boys in orange decided to down tools literally five minutes after we’d parked up. Once they’d left, we gave them an additional five minutes before we grabbed our gear and made our way into the tunnels, to account for any of them who might have left their beloved tape measure or spirit level behind. The first tunnel, the Waterloo Tunnel, smelt strongly of tar or creosote. We weren’t sure of the source, but the floor was fairly manky, giving an indication that there may have been a recent spillage. That, however, was perhaps the most interesting part of this section of the explore. All in all, it didn’t seem especially exceptional – even if it was quite wide. Hoping the explore would be better in the latter half, then, we cracked on and made our way towards the open-air section. As several other reports have revealed, the open-air section/accident between the two tunnels is full of shit. It seems Liverpool folk don’t bother visiting the local tip, they simply lob their old goodies off the bridge on Fontenoy Street. Anyone seeking spare lawnmower parts, or a second-hand seatee, should get themselves straight down to the Waterloo Tunnel. Sadly, we didn’t need either, so we had to clamber over the mountain of shit instead, to reach the Victoria Tunnel on the other side. Once inside the Victoria Tunnel, we began our long walk towards Edge Hill Station. At this point, we weren’t aware how long the bloody thing is, but it soon became clear to us that the light at the end of the tunnel wasn’t getting much closer any time soon. Nevertheless, we plodded on, heading towards the small dot of light in the far distance. The Victoria Tunnel was much more interesting that its sister. A large proportion of it is brick-lined, but there are also large unlined sections that have simply been carved out. There are several ventilation shafts to look at along the way too, and each one is different to the last. It’s only now, having been inside the Victoria Tunnel, that we understand what a few of the random structures are on the surface directly above. Finally, the tunnel ends with a short section of railway track that is still in situ, which is always nice to find. The only things to be careful of down this end are Network Rail workers and, so we have been told, a camera waiting for unsuspecting visitors to the tunnel. Explored with Veryhighguy and The J Man. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29: 30:
  5. History Unlike the railways in Europe or northern America, New Zealand tracks were rudimentary. They were built cheaply and hastily using light iron rails that had a narrow 3ft 6in gauge. Even the tunnels and bridges were minimalistic and usually made as small as possible to get the railways up and running as quickly as possible. It was always the intention, though, that the lines would be improved in the future as traffic and available finances increased. The four-hundred and sixty-two metre long Chain Hills Railway Tunnel, also known as Wingatui Tunnel, was one of the tunnels built in the 1870s, during New Zealand’s brief period of industrialisation. The line itself was constructed to improve transportation of coal and other natural resources across the land to major ports, where the goods could then be shipped elsewhere. Like the Caversham Tunnel, the Chain Hills Tunnel was largely dug out by hand, but it is unique in the sense that it is a Victorian styled brick tunnel that would have taken longer to build than some of the others that were carved out. The Chain Hills Tunnel also sparked much excitement in Dunedin during its construction as workmen made an interesting discovery while making a cutting at the southern end of the tunnel. Thirty-five feet under the ground, which it is thought was once swampland, a large number of moa bones were found (a flightless bird endemic to New Zealand). The bones ranged in shape and size and were in a very good state of preservation owing to the high alkaline levels in the soil. The Chain Hills Tunnel was completed in 1875, and it was measured as being four hundred and sixty-two metres long. Progress was aided with the construction of brick kilns at either end of the tunnel, as this meant materials did not run short because bricks were constantly available throughout the project. However, finishing the tunnel proved to be a difficult and dangerous task. For years the project was plagued by regular flooding, which slowed progress, and workers were also encumbered by the hardness of the stone they were cutting through. Alongside these issues, six months before completion a rock fall occurred at the north end of the tunnel. The incident claimed the lives of two men, Patrick Dempsey and Thomas Kerr. A third man was severely injured as both of his legs were shattered, leaving him crippled for the rest of his life. In the end, the tunnel did not remain in service for very long either as it was abandoned in 1914. A new dual-lane tunnel was constructed further south which meant there was no longer any need for the Chain Hills Tunnel. In the short period of time the Chain Hills Tunnel was operational it claimed another life – that of Irishman George Thompson. Reports indicate that late one evening in 1895, George took a shortcut through the tunnel to get home. Although there are several niches in the tunnel it is likely George was unaware of them, or simply too far away to reach one, before he noticed the oncoming train. Since its closure, however, no more lives have been lost. For a while the tunnel was used as a popular way of passing between Abbotsford and Wingatui, and for moving sheep between the two locations. Nevertheless, since the 1980s the tunnel has been closed to the public due to the deterioration of the tunnel’s structural integrity and subsequent health and safety concerns. In recent years there have been plans to redevelop the tunnel into part of the proposed Otago Central Rail Trail (a cycle and pedestrian track). But, due to lack of funding and ongoing concerns surrounding the structural integrity of the tunnel, especially with the increased risk of it being damaged by an earthquake, the project has come to a standstill. The only recent work Dunedin City Council has carried out on the Chain Hills Tunnel has been to shift two vents from sewer gas reticulation pipes, to stop them from venting into the tunnel. Our Version of Events Having just returned from a South Island trip the previous night, we had no intentions of going exploring, until Nillskill rocked up that is. He was passing back through Dunedin so we decided while he was around to have a crack at the old Chain Hills Tunnel that’s been on the cards for quite a while. We understand there was a public open day a few months ago, but going to an event like that would take away one of the most interesting parts of exploring – figuring out how to slip into these places. We loaded up the car with the usual gear and raided the fridge for all the beers we had spare, then set off in the direction of Mosgiel, a town that is apparently well-known for its local legends and myths. The drive didn’t take too long, which is always good, but the next hour or so we spent trying to find the damn tunnel was a right challenge. To avoid a couple of nearby farms we headed into a patch of native woodland. This would most likely have been quite pleasant, if we’d been able to see where the fuck we were going. But, as we didn’t want to risk using the torches with the farms being so close, we ended up getting very lost among the trees and bushes. After following a few false trails, we did eventually stumbled across the entrance to the tunnel. Just the faint sight of it in the distance raised our disheartened spirits. The next challenge, though, was to get past a locked gate. Fortunately, this wasn’t as bad as it had first appeared, probably due to the fact that we’ve had plenty of practice in the art of contortion over the years we’ve been exploring. To keep it brief, despite some initial doubts about our ability to contort through the space available to us, we managed to worm our way inside. As expected, the inside of the tunnel was incredibly muddy. Even sticking close to the walls didn’t help very much. As for the tunnel itself, though, it was, aesthetically speaking, very pleasant. It reminded us of an old Victorian railway tunnel you’d find in the UK. The condition of some of the bricks in the Chain Hills Tunnel are quite poor too, which enhances its overall photogenicity. Other than that, however, there isn’t a lot else to see. That’s the nature of old railway tunnels unfortunately. We did find a couple of niches and a few pipes belonging to the sewer system, but they’re pretty standard finds in these places. Eventually, after what felt like a fair bit of walking, we found ourselves at the second gate. For some reason, the authorities had left this one open, probably due to the fact that the tunnel is inaccessible from this side. Whatever the reason, it gave us an easy exit from the tunnel, where we found ourselves on a narrow muddy trail surrounded by dense forest. Apparently, if you continue down the track for a while you eventually reach the present day railway line, but it’s quite difficult for anyone to access the tunnel from this side. We didn’t walk down the trail to find out if this is true mind, since we had a bottle of whisky to get started on back in Dunedin. Explored with Nillskill. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14:
  6. The History (shamelessly ripped from Wiki) Holborn tramway station was a tram stop underneath Kingsway in central London, England. It was built in 1906 by the London County Council Tramways as part of the Kingsway Tramway Subway joining the separate networks of tramways in North and South London. When opened it was named Great Queen Street. Tram services commenced on 24 February 1906, running from Angel to Aldwych, the next station in the subway. Through services across London began on 10 April 1908, running from Highbury station through Holborn and then east to Tower Bridge or south to Gate. The routes that used the Kingsway Subway were numbered 31, 33, and 35. Following the decision to withdraw tram services in London and replace them with buses, the station closed just after 12.30am on 6 April 1952. Much of the station remains in the disused subway but there is no public access. Following it's closure, the station was used as a backdrop various TV shows & films. Most notably it was featured in the 2008 film The Escapist, as a fictional London Underground station called "Union Street", which was said to be on the Northern Line between Elephant & Castle and Borough. Remains of the film props, such as a fake tube map and a Union Street tube roundel, can still be seen pasted to the walls of the station. The props date from 2008, and are not part of the original station. In 2009 the subway and station was the venue for an art installation, Chord, by Conrad Shawcross. The Explore This was a short but sweet explore that we did while on the way to something else. I did this one with my missus & partner in crime Vixxie , as well as @extreme_ironing . We started off the night with a quick round in one of the local watering holes, to give us a spot of Dutch courage & to catch up with goings on & such. We then made our way over to the entry point, which was rather fun to say the least. It’s pretty pedestrian as far as this type of splore goes, but it’s still a rather bait affair. Needless to say, the Dayglo invisibility cloak was in full effect! Once we were all in, we had a scope of the area. Having heard about a lot of activity at one end of the place, we were slightly on edge. We decided to go over to the other side first, & soon we arrived at the old poster boards. They look pretty plain in themselves, just large metal panels with a surround, but together with original cream & olive green brickwork, you could easily imagine what it was like when the place was in operation. I took a couple of shots from here, which wasn’t easy. I imagine it would have been some time ago, that is until someone fucked a giant concrete wall through the middle of the platform! After this we got to a large open room with pillars running down it. Walking through got progressively difficult, with the sloping ceiling tapering to nothing at the far side. Half way down we found a little tunnel offshoot which we crawled into. The tunnel started to curve around quite sharply, we worked out that this is where Kingsway becomes the Strand. After a bit of a tight walk through, the tunnel came to an abrupt end. Rested against the wall was a workman’s ladder, which lead up to what looked like a ledge. Being rather curious I decided to go up & have a look. Up top there was a large plastic cover which capped off the space, I thought “that’s odd”, & so I pulled it up to have a look. What I didn’t realise is that it wasn’t a ledge or crawl space at all, rather the top of the wall, & over the other side was the busy road tunnel! With nothing else to see there, we headed over to the money shots, which were the fake Union Street roundels & propaganda posters. Even though they aren’t real, seeing them still gives you that sense that you’ve found something special. I especially enjoyed the poster board, which was rammed full of old wartime posters & fliers. What I didn’t know about & what was a nice find were all of the old cast iron street lights piled up along one side. It seemed a shame that they weren’t being put to use, but part of me was thinking it’s nicer to see them here than painted up all new like on the streets. We gathered a few more snaps of the place, whilst being cautious of movement further along the tunnel. Not wanting to push our luck, & needing to continue to the next location, we made our way back out. The Pics 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 Thanks for looking
  7. Dudley rail tunnel was opened in 1850 to allow the Oxford-Worcester-Wolverhampton Line between Stourbridge and Wolverhampton to pass for several hundred yards beneath Dudley. The tunnel was regularly used by passenger trains until 1964, when the town's station closed along with the remaining passenger stations on the line, although goods trains were still allowed to use the line. It finally closed to all trains on 19 March 1993, when the section of railway between Walsall and Brierley Hill was closed after 143 years in use. A cable laying train passed through the tunnel on 2 July 1993 - nearly four months after the line was officially closed. Explored with @plod and a 28DL member. Plod
  8. The History The railway tunnel, opened in 1848 by George Stephenson and the York & North Midland railway company, ran 400 yards directly below Langcliffe Avenue from the A61 Leeds roundabout to the opposite side of Tewit Well Road. Initially, the locals opposed the railway being built, so the tunnel was built around the railway to keep it out of sight. The branch from Brunswick tunnel and the station was then abandoned after 14 years in operation. The abandoned tunnel was later converted into an air-raid shelter during WW2, with steps leading down to it from the Leeds road roundabout area. A concrete floor had been laid with a 6ft high brick wall lining the tunnel, and the remains of makeshift toilet cubicles in the four corners of the shelter were present. The air-raid shelter finally became abandoned in 1943 due to the bombing of The Majestic Hotel in 1941. The tunnel is mostly free from vandalism, apart from some minor graffiti which dates as far back as the 1970's. The indents on the ground from the sleepers are still evident, and the portal has 2 fixed metal grills to allow bats to use the tunnel. The Explore I explored this one with @plod, and another time with some non-members. after spending hours on research and putting together a detailed map it actually turned out much easier to find than we had anticipated. Getting to the entrance was pretty tricky though (as well as actually accessing the tunnel) and when we arrived it soon became clear that our £8 wilko torch was not going to cut it, so with this place being pretty local we decided to do a more detailed explore in a return visit Even with the return trip & better torches my camera really struggled with the poor lighting so picture quality isn't its best. We knew that the tunnel was basically a straight line so we headed right towards the end where we came across a wall with a doorway. Through here was an empty brick room with toilet cubicles in the corners, and past that room through the opposite doorway was a staircase leading to a pile of rubble underneath the Leeds Road roundabout, which had been dug into by the workmen in the 1960's who didn't know it was there, so sadly that's as far as we could go. This is a neat little place in Harrogate that not many people actually know of.
  9. History ‘Boxed In’ is likely to be part of the Etherley Dene Colliery. Although the specific history is rather vague, evidence suggests this was the closest mine in the nearby vicinity, and it was one that was spread over a considerable amount of land. Traditionally, coal was mined in the Bishop Auckland area for a long time, and there are numerous references to coal mining in the area in terms of place and street names. Therefore, the likelihood we ended up in a former coal mine is high. The colliery first opened sometime in the mid-1800s, when the industry was said to be booming, by R. Atherton. It was sold to Quarry Drift Colliery Ltd. in the 1920s, and later to the National Coal Board in 1947. The mine was closed in the early 1950s when the main coal seam dried up and it became unfeasible, economically, to continue operations at the site. Most of the mine was filled in in parts, for safety reasons, and its entrances all sealed. Throughout its entire history there were only five fatalities reported at this colliery; although, records are reported to be missing. All of the individuals who were in the register were either crushed to death or fell from a height. Our Version of Events After spending one too many nights smoking ‘reefer’ and drinking with the locals of Bishop Auckland, we heard rumours of a cave – ‘Smokies Cave’, as they all referred to it. After spending several minutes listening to them explaining how big the place was, and how you could still access multiple levels, we decided it would be worth seeking out. Unsure whether ‘Smokies Cave’ really existed or not, we set off late the next afternoon to find it. Unfortunately, though, as we had no transport, other than one bicycle, we ended up hiking seven miles to reach it. Much to our disappointment, after a fairly thorough search, we failed to find the elusive cave on this first excursion. A few days later, we decided to try again. This time we resolved not to dawdle and reached the area much more quickly. After a further thirty minutes walking aimlessly around a patch of woodland, we stumbled across a reasonably sized inflow concealed behind a large concrete wall. It was an old cylindrical structure constructed of large stones. Having deduced that the old mine may be accessible via this old culvert, and agreeing that this looked like a worthwhile explore anyway, we decided to enter the culvert. To begin with, it was an inviting explore, as it had a perfect stone lined floor and minimal stooping was required. What is more, there was very little water flow and no dirty debris, so having not brought waders with us we were happy chappies indeed. It took a good few minutes to pass through the nice stone culvert, until we reached an opening to our left, which we assumed was ‘Smokies Cave’. Unsure whether to proceed, as it looked incredibly wet and muddy, we fumbled with a ‘cigarette’ for a moment. Having already decided we would probably enter anyway, regardless of the dampness and muck, we took a quick break and smoked it to put off the inevitable for a moment longer – the unavoidable fact that we were going to get very dirty. Unfortunately, sparking up down here turned out to be a big mistake, and we soon found out why the cave is known as ‘Smokies Cave’. Lighting up down there creates a very dense cloud of smoke that stubbornly refuses to move, no matter how much wafting you try to do. Consequently, taking clear photographs becomes very difficult. In the end, we finished up with a set of snaps that looked as though they’d been taken down a steamy sewer. On top of the smoke issue we’d created, we quickly discovered that the cave was much wetter and muddier than we’d first anticipated. Furthermore, the ceiling height becomes very low at this point and it becomes necessary to crawl on all fours – both hands and knees. As we crawled on, passing remnants of condom wrappers and the odd cider can, we became increasingly desperate to find somewhere we could stand up. Fortunately, we reached this point after around ten metres or so, and from this point on we name this section ‘Pussy’s Point’. This is the most spacious part, boasting a head clearance of approximately 12ft, so you can stand up. For a good distance this section, which looks as though it dates back to the early twentieth century, is lined with bricks and it looks a little bit like it was originally a ventilation shaft. A lot of coal fragments are scattered across the floor in here. In many ways, it reminded us of the service tunnels in Standedge canal tunnel, where you disembark from the raft (if you enter via dinghy). Looking ahead, further down into the cave, a very small crevasse-looking type of thing was visible, and it was filled with rubbish and other pieces of shit. It looked very much like a dead end. This seemed like the sort of place people tend to avoid, unless you want to take a piss into it from the entrance point, especially since it was roughly four-foot-tall and four-foot-wide and involved slithering on your chest through the mud, wrappers and other dubious-looking things. For some unknown reason, however, we decided to risk catching gonorrhoea and other highly contagious things, and we went for it. The sludgy shit made strange sounds as we crawled on, but we tried to avoid looking at it. The smell was bad enough after all. We continued like this, winding left and right, for what felt like an eternity, until eventually the height of the ceiling began to increase. Five minutes later, down in the depths of the cave things started to feel much different. It began to feel like some sort of game of survival. Although it was much cleaner down here, the walls of the cave were changing in colours and textures, sort of like an LSD trip (we imagine), and it felt as though we were becoming lost in a different sort of world, far away from the surface. What was certain at this point, however, was the fact that we were definitely in a former mine since the ceiling was flat and there were random man-made mounds of debris here and there, which made crawling very difficult. A number of roughly made brick walls started to appear in this deeper section too, which made the whole things feel increasingly like a forgotten labyrinth. The height and width of the mine changes a lot down here; at some points, while lying flat on the floor, the ceiling is about two inches above you, and at others it is much higher. After two hundred metres or so of crawling along the ground, we reached a ramp that led down into a long straight tunnel. This tunnel, unfortunately, is filled up to the ceiling with water. While we were a little disappointed the explore was ending here, we were able to push aside our disappointment as we became captivated by a series of beautiful coal veins which were dotted everywhere around us. At this point, though, we started to notice that our heads were hurting, presumably due to a lack of oxygen, so we decided to make a hasty exit. As you might expect, it took us a lot less time getting out than it did getting inside! Back in the oxygen filled entrance to ‘Smokies Cave’ (the smoke had finally cleared now), we decided to continue our walk down the culvert. The fantastic stone continued the entire way, right up until the end where we reached a metal grate covering the exit. As you can imagine, this walk was blissful compared to the cave where we’d been forced to crawl. It didn’t take too long to bypass the metal grill, and slightly relieved to be in the fresh tasting air of the woodland we headed up the hill to where we guessed civilisation might be. A few free roaming horses passed us as we scrambled through thick brambles, which we thought was a little strange. Determined to find civilisation, however, we chose not to stop and mediate on the situation. Further up the hill, we edged past some sort of mini-rave tent gathering too, where the sound of Macky Gee tickled our ears, which, again, seemed rather out of the ordinary given where we were. At this point, we decided we’d had enough of Bishop Auckland’s strange occurrences, though, and keen to re-join a bit of normality we continued on without stopping, hoping to find a road or a building of some description. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Box, Husky and Beth. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29: 30:
  10. I have wanted to see this place for over 2 years, so was great to see it at last. I like photographing Victorian brickwork, which upstood years of use and then years of neglect, and is still in good condition. Many thanks to Hughie for this one. Very little history on the place but this is the underground Victorian reservoir of the Grantham Water Company which was formed in 1855 Explored with the most excellent company of Mikeymutt, Rubex & JanovitchGagovan. thanks for looking
  11. Hi all, I'm new to Oblivion State, but I've been doing Urban Exploring for about 18 months now. Here is my latest explore from late last night. Coulsdon Deep Shelter This was the site of my first proper Urban Explore about 18 months ago. I remember scrabbling through the woods one October night with some friends (that I think were quite convinced I was trying to get them killed) trailing behind me to try and find the way in. Eventually of course we made it in and it was all worth it. I of course had no idea what I was really doing, I don't think any of use really do when we start this rather weird hobby. Neither the less, 18 months later and I'm still hooked (and somewhat poorer with all the camera equipment I've bought). I heard that this the shelter had been sealed up with a massive pile of dirt back in the middle of last year. However a few months later there was a report up in October saying it was back open again. So I made a mental note to go re-visit when I got a chance. History The History has been said many time about this locations, so I won't go into great detail. You can get a very detailed write up anyway if you look this shelter on Google, so I'm not going to try and compete with that. It was constructed in 1941 It was bough by Cox, Hargreaves and Thomson Ltd, a manufacturing company that made Optical Equipment. They operated from the 1950s to the 1960s. However the moisture and cold made the tunnel unusable for manufacturing high precision equipment. It was bought by a motor vehicle repair company but they moved out for the same reasons sometime later. It was sealed up and left for years before being opened up at sometime later. The Visit I tried to find 'the usual' way in, but as reported a massive (Its truly massive, it would take a digger hours to clear it all away) mound of dirt and bricks was piled on top of it. Anyway, we dug about with sticks a bit to try and work out how someone got in previously, but gave up after a short while. We started to head back in defeat before accidentally stumbling across a totally new way in. Compared to 18 months ago, not much has really changed in the shelter. The only new thing is the bright pink speakers and DJ mixer that have been left in there from rave some people must have had in there. There was actually cable going into the entrance from outside, so I am assuming they ran a small generator outside and ran the power inside for the speakers. Pretty clever IMO. Full album here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/grahamr123/albums/72157661916861733
  12. Evening kids, first report of the new year and as its my home town i kinda feel like i should make a bit of effort with this one. My long standing curiosity of what was on the other side of a certain wall in worcester was satisfied last night when i finally got around to hopping it and having a nosey, this in turn sparked a morning's research into what the tunnel was used for, which then lead to me reading a whole bunch of other stuff about the rest of the shrub hill and lowesmore industrial sites. As i said this is home turf for me and some of the derp warehouses that were standing around this part of town some 15 years ago when i was a young punk skiving off school were some of my first explorations, long before the cameras, the forums and the term uRb3X it was just me and my mates being little shits and going where we wanted. After a few years of raving it up reaching for the lazers and going out on the smash every weekend here i am full circle hanging out in derps again, only difference is this time i got a camera and a car Anyway enough of the life story, on with the explore, the shrub hill tunnel is a tunnel which runs down from the main lines of shrub hill, it was a siding used to service various companies. HHere's a lovely little hand drawn map of what we are looking at, pic courtesy of miac.org.co.uk, the tunnel is the dotted line running diagonally across/underneath the heenan froude ltd company Little bit of history about 3 of the companies the tunnel and siding serviced - In 1857 Thomas Clunes established the Vulcan Iron Works, Cromwell Street, Worcester as iron and brass founders. clunes later went into business with a couple railway fellas by the name of McKenzie and Holland and branched into the railway signal manufacturing business. Mckenzie & Holland manufactured signalling equipment which was used in many British and overseas signal boxes. The company expanded to become the foremost manufacturer of signalling equipment in the UK. Walter Holland became a J.P. for the City and County and was Mayor of Worcester from 1878 until 1881 and again in 1887. Mckenzie & Holland merged with other signal manufacturers in 1901 and became a limited company at the same time, wholly owned by the Consolidated Signal Company Limited. The Worcester operation was closed in 1921. The Mckenzie & Holland locomotive was then purchased by Heenan & Froude Ltd who took over responsibility for rail traffic. As you can see from the map above and the pic below here the tracks from the tunnel led right down to the worcester birmingham canal to accommodate goods coming in or going out via canal barge and locomotive, given the vulcan iron works were in the iron business i'm imagining a lot of coal was more than likely being brought down the shrub hill tunnel. The shrub hill tunnel ran underneath another company by the east side entrance to the tunnel, the Heenan and froude ltd company. Heenan & Froude was famous for building the 518ft high Blackpool Tower. It was once one of the largest employers of skilled workers in the area. The Company, who also had a factory in Manchester, opened its operation in Worcester in 1903, having moved from the Aston Iron Works in Birmingham to a part of the former worcester engine works co site at Shrub Hill. Heenan & Froude was a general purpose engineering company who made amongst other things exhaust and mine ventilating fans, colliery and mining plant, belts, conveyors, elevators, sawing machines, bench chains, water dynamo meters, spherical, horizontal and vertical engines, patent water boilers, bridge and roof iron work, and refuse destructors. Heenan & Froude also used the sidings that had been laid in 1865 and that were connected the 'vinegar works branch line. Shunting of rail traffic on the site was originally the responsibility of mckenzie & holland. When Mckenzie & Holland ceased in 1921 its locomotive was sold to Heenan & Froude who took over the shunting of the railway traffic. A new locomotive was purchased in 1928. The location of the engine shed is not known. This is the heenan and Froude building, the tunnel on the left in the first two images with the clock tower is the same as the small dark tunnel on the right in the third pic, im just stood right up the other end. i actually rooftopped this building when i was a kid, camera wasnt great on my 3310 though This is a quick couple of pics of how everything lays out on top, mainly because there's scaff and i could get a nice shot over the area On with the tunnel pics then This is the west side tunnel entrance leading into what was the vulcan ironworks/mckenzie holland and onto the canal. The tunnel on the right in this pic is the east side of the tunnel, 2 that's about it i reckon, thanks for looking kids happy new year to y'all
  13. Little bit of history first :- Port Mulgrave owes it"s existence purely to the Ironstone industry. Created at a cost of £45,000 circa1852 by Sir Charles Palmer who needed a way of transporting his Ironstone from port Mulgrave to the blast funaces & Ironworks in Jarrow (owned by himself & his brother George) Originally it was named Far Rosedale, but to avoid confusion with the existing Rosedale Ironworks in North yorks moors he renamed it port Mulgrave in honour of the Earl of mulgrave a local prominent landowner. Tunneling began circa 1854 and the ironstone was extracted directly from the surrounding cliffside being loaded onto ships via wooden jetty"s with a narrow gauge line of 3ft above and below for direct loading into the hulls of the boats. By the 1870"s Port Mulgraves depleted Ironstone production was replaced with more productive seams found 3 miles away in Grinkle Park and as the only means of transporting the Ironstone was still via the sea the Port Mulgrave tunnel was extended a further mile through to Dalehouse & futher additions through the valley incorporating 3 wooden viaducts & a futher tunnel under Ridge Lane to the newly formed Grinkle Mine. Port Mulgrave harbour continued transporting the Ironstone until 1917 when a rail link to the Whitby to Middlesborough main line was connected, mainly due to the new maritime risk to ships due to WW1. A fire severely damaged the jetty"s which was repaired but the now basically unused harbour was finally blown up by the Royal Engineers in WW2 in case those pesky Nazi"s tried to use it. Now, i cannot stress this enough, the Port Mulgrave tunnel system & drift mine is "DEADLY" to say the least. It has multiple roof collapses along it"s length, with the first one almost immediately inside the main tunnel portal, never mind the following collapses along it and the fact as you climb up into what is basically the roof void, the remaining roof structure is still collapsing, even without help from being knocked by a camera mounted on a tripod. it really is that fragile. i had to push very large rock sections that were hanging precariously out of the roof to get them to fall controlled rather than risk them falling onto me as i slid underneath them, and this was at both blockages. As you will see in the pics water flows from the left hand tunnel, which was the Ironstone drift part into the Tramway tunnel, through deep ochre & water along with it"s own multiple collapses as far as you can see or risk to venture. The water /ochre from the drift side is pretty deep inside the tramway tunnel, this appeared to be due to a small roof collapse into a side audit which looks like part of a side drift coming off the tunnel itself. I decided for some reason to waste valuable time etc removing large rock sections & cleaning the audit entrance to allow the water to drain into the drift (as of leaving the water level had dropped @4") although this still required waders to proceed to the 2nd tunnel roof collapse. Longer story short, as there"s no recent reports from here (TBH i"ve not found anything past the first flooded section) it was always going to be possibly high on the risk factor, especially solo, & even allowing for a recce i made the the week before & discussions with Stranton regarding the "AIR" issues & possible cave ins i returned solo like a complete "W@nker"!! Totally Ignoring the conversation we"d had about me finding some dead explorers inside Note that the first section is fine & dandy if you don"t mind crap air & possible roof collapses along with associated slips & falls into orange & black mud. I had to walk down the rail lines due to the depth of water, it should be fine in whellies by now after my hard work unblocking After climbing through the 2nd tunnel collapse it dries out dramatically due to the roof collapse blocking the flow. All side audits throughout have collapses completely filling them up & spalling into the tunnel. (the first one being the only one relatively clear). This also raises the obvious question of air quality, especially with no flow of air felt inside Indeed i had to remove my mask as i was having trouble breathing easily even in the first section while i was taking my pics (in both directions as i proceed, cos you never know & i just accepted the smell of damp & mud etc ( first clue you idiot o_O) after sampling the air in the 2nd section of the tunnel it seemed no different so i carried on with my picture taking including the other trackway running off to the left (as you face the sea) which was completely blocked by a major roof collapse. ( there"s a trend forming here) & i progressed to the 3rd major roof collapse. This was a little more restrictive and after climbing up & into the roof void again i was met with loose rocks & falling debris at the slightest touch. I decided to leave my camera mounted tripod on the roof pile & check out the next section without it, due to the restriction created by this roof collapse. I slid down into this section which was much the same as the last & could see another collapse in the distance to which i walked up to through a few inches of mud. The tunnel was now completely sealed by this blockage so i decided to just take a few pics on my phone rather than the farce that would be going back for my camera etc. As i went for my phone i realised i was hyperventilating, that"s weird i thought i"ve not exerted myself, i slowed my breathing down but was unable to get my breath,i immediately felt sick & wanted to void myself this is when the penny dropped and i bailed as fast as you can in a mud filled debris strewn tunnel section in complete darkness, hoping my head torch didn"t fail & i didn"t die (ironically) with my heart seemingly coming out of my chest like a pounding drum & my lungs over inflating trying to find some breathable air inside i threw myself up the first collapse grabbed the camera as threw myself back down into the 2nd section hoping to find some air, especially as i"d already come through here without any problems. No exactly the same situation as the last one, by this time which seemed like forever & i honestly thought it was my time. I could see the next collapse ahead of me but i didn"t think i could make it as the pain from my chest & lungs were joined with a feeling i was drifting off. I only just managed to get up & over the collapse bringing some of the roof down on me as i did, & ended up on my knees in the flooded 1st tunnel section with hardly any strength to carry on, obviously as i"m writing this (badly) there was breathable air still in this section and i managed to somewhat regain my breathing & heatbeat down to @200BPM & after about 5 mins came out of the complex. Then for some reason instead of the long cliff walk of broken ankles i decided to climb straight up the cliff side above the tunnel portal to get to the top of the cliffs (don"t do it,it"s too dangerous especially in the wind & rain. i blame the lack of oxygen for this idiotic act, as for entering the tunnel :wanker Anyway on with the pics, in hindsight i can honestly say it was"nt worth it & the last thing i"d want is anyone to attempt this without BA & buddies. All i can think is i had used all the breathable air as i traveled through the tunnel system ? I"ll do this is two parts with the drift mine side being the first & follow it with the O2 free tunnel afterwards. I won"t apologise for the picture heavy post, but i do apologise for the ramblings above, except the "WARNINGS" Below is an original image of the wooden Jetty"s and Harbour showing the 3ft narrow gauge tracks etc Copyright image archive. http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://image-archive.org.uk/wp-content/MAX/2011_04/port-mulgrave.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.image-archive.org.uk/?cat=63&h=641&w=1000&tbnid=I1mHqZYoYPJTKM:&zoom=1&docid=hJS-dMor9gIHyM&ei=m-pTVd-5FIzXU42-gOgD&tbm=isch&ved=0CCgQMygIMAg Below is one of the Locomotives that ran from Grinkle mine through to Port Musgrave. Copyright Image archive. http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://image-archive.org.uk/wp-content/MAX/2011_04/Dale-House-to-Port-Mulgrave-tunnel.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.image-archive.org.uk/?cat=63&h=535&w=800&tbnid=5OmAxxpicdMOnM:&zoom=1&docid=hJS-dMor9gIHyM&ei=m-pTVd-5FIzXU42-gOgD&tbm=isch&ved=0CCQQMygEMAQ Below a copy of the information panel on the cliff top at Port Mulgrave showing the original set up, the Tunnel portal can be seen with the rails running over the Jetty, and the spur tunnel running underneath this one. Thanks to Phils link, more so as he"s been an inspiration regarding tunnels & the fact it was raining so didn"t get a clean shot of the information panal on the cliff top lol https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CAcQjRw&url=http://www.flickriver.com/photos/phill_dvsn/sets/72157605736236124/&ei=h-xTVcz4KsG8UqDvgIgE&bvm=bv.93112503,d.d24&psig=AFQjCNHAoUmgd5PSUkGbniKl6Yalgigvgg&ust=1431649246006843 Port Mulgrave Tunnel Lower level Portal Main portal Looking back t entrance Portal Looking down from first collapse down to twin Tunnel Portals.Drift on left, Tramway on right. Drift Tunnel 1 Drift Tunnel 2 Drift Tunnel 3 Drift Tunnel 4 Reverse view in Drift Tunnel 1 Reverse view in Drift Tunnel 2 Tramway Tunnel 1 Tramway Tunnel side Drift 1 Side Drift, un-blocked Tramway Tunnel 3 Tramway Tunnel 4 Tramway tunnel first roof collapse Looking down from the roof collapse 2nd section Tramway Tunnel Continuing down the Tunnel Looking towards roof collapse No 2 2nd roof collapse Reverse Tramway Tunnel Twin Tunnels. Lower Tramway Tunnel on left Back into 1st section
  14. built during the war so work could continue in the event of the factory above getting bombed on with some pics from the explore with the elusive the mini was removed from this section of the tunnels and now sits elsewhere as the story of the mini being in the tunnels , workers were using it to zip about the factory and had a slight mishap with a crate and squashed the roof , they then hid it where the boss didn't know low mileage one not so carefull owner , needs more than just a tcut thanks for looking ,, more on my flicker https://www.flickr.com/photos/128166151@N05/albums/72157657321352753
  15. History “No boat shall enter Butterley Tunnel at the east end except between the hours of five and six in the morning, one and two in the afternoon, and nine and ten at night, and no boat shall enter the west end thereof, except between the hours of one and two in the morning, nine and ten in the forenoon, and five and six at night, and every boat shall make its passage through the same with all possible dispatch and on no account exceed three hours after such entry. And if any person or persons having the care of any boat, shall offend in any of the particular aforesaid, he or they shall forfeit for every such offence: forty shillings and shall also turn back on meeting another boat in the said tunnel†(Extract from the Rules, Byelaws and Orders made by the Cromford Canal Company: 30th May 1804). Butterley Tunnel was opened in 1794 and it runs for approximately one and three quarters of a mile, along the disused Cromford Canal. Although tools were much more basic in the late 1700s, than what we have available today, upon completion the tunnel was measured to be 2,966 yards (2712 metres) long, 9 foot (2.7 metres) wide at water level and 8 foot (2.4 metres) high from the water to soffit; although this depended on the water level after heavy rain. Much of the water flows from the 50 acre reservoir situated on the hill above the west side of the tunnel. There is no tow path inside Butterley Tunnel, so all narrow boats had to be powered through using the muscle power of the narrow boat’s crew. This is a process commonly known as ‘legging’. Consequently, a number of signs were displayed at either end of the tunnel, emphasising the use of the tunnel in only one direction at any one time. Any crew found to be disobeying these rules would receive a hefty fine. In 1889, subsidence caused the tunnel to close for four years. The tunnel was eventually reopened after repairs in 1893, however, the long period of closure resulted in the loss of many customers to rapidly expanding railway companies. A second collapse, in 1900, due to mining related subsidence, caused partial damage and effectively split the tunnel into two sections, making it impassable to narrow boats and their crews. Despite the efforts of Rudolph de Sails, a director of a prominent canal freight company, who conducted a government funded survey of the tunnel, it remained abandoned because the 1904 report was not favourable. A third collapse in June 1907, and a subsequent report by Sir William Matthews, ended all hopes of ever repairing and reopening the tunnel. It was declared beyond economical repair in 1909. The canal continued to operate without the tunnel up until 1944, until commercial traffic finally ceased. The war is likely to have stopped all final activity. Since its closure, Butterley Tunnel has still been extended twice, to allow the construction of a railway and the A38 road. One of the more distinguishable changes is the culverted section of the western portal which runs for 18 metres. But, in 2013 it was announced that much of the canal and the tunnel were now exceptional monuments and work by the ‘Friends of the Cromford Canal’ to preserve them has continued. No more changes to the tunnel, other than repair or restorative work, is now permitted. The Friends of the Cromford Canal are a group of volunteers who aim to fully restore Butterley Tunnel and the Cromford Canal. A few years ago they offered horse drawn visits into the only navigable section of the tunnel to raise money, however it is uncertain whether or not they still continue to do this given the poor integrity of the structure. Our Version of Events We left Leeds and the Dark Arches behind just as it was getting dark. Next on our agenda was something else that lies underground, but this time the dinghy was required! We’ve attempted Butterley once before and ended up paddling our way down the abandoned Cromford Canal; which was entertaining in itself, but a little disappointing since we didn’t manage to reach the tunnel entrance because of extremely overgrown and dry sections. This time, we avoided a leisurely cruise down the waterway and arrived directly at the tunnel entrance itself; wasting no time putting waders on and inflating our trusty vessel. We had assumed that some sections might be dry, because the tunnel is abandoned after all, yet the heavy rains in recent weeks must have raised the water level quite considerably. We didn’t spot any dry land while inside and only had to leave the dinghy once to bypass a pile of rubble and silt which had fallen from one of the air shafts directly above us. Later, by the time we reached some of the supports a fair distance into the tunnel, the water level was too high to get the dinghy beneath and we didn’t fancy climbing over the wooden support beams because they are no longer made of wood; they’re more sponge than anything else. A final attempt to ditch the dinghy and wade our way further into the tunnel also failed on account of the depth of the water. Climbing out of the dinghy is easy enough, but climbing back inside is altogether a different task. As you try to haul yourself back inside, without being able to touch the ground beneath the water, you get sucked under the boat. After a few failed attempts to find the ground, and one breeched pair of waders, we decided to head back to the cars and tents for a bit of rest before the next day’s activities. On a final note, I would warn anyone else thinking of visiting Butterley Tunnel that it is a bit worse for wear these days, and we witnessed several sections where the wooden support beams have disintegrated from the ceiling. After seeing images of reports from years ago, a number of the support beams which used to lie at floor level have also disappeared. The brickwork is a bit sketchy too in certain places, where new cracks have formed and subsidence has caused a number of bulges to appear. It was certainly a little disconcerting as we paddled on, knowing that the tunnel has collapsed in on itself before. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do, Rizla Rider and Husky. 1: The Night Begins 2: Preparing the Vessel 3: The Western Entrance: The Corrugated Steel Lined Concrete Culvert 4: The End of the Culvert Section 5: Inside Butterley Tunnel 6: Rail Extension: Curved Steel Support Beams Backed by Wood 7: Inspecting the Woodwork 8: Some Structural Damage 9: Reaching the End of the Metal Support Beams (the Low Red Brick Arch) 10: Original Tunnel Support Beams 11: Passing Through the Original Wooden Beams 12: The Brick Lined Section 13: Old Brickwork 14: Second Section of Original Support Beams 15: Almost at the Ventilator Shaft 16: A Bit of Seepage (Close to the Old Reservoir Audits) - The Wooden Slats on the Floor Should have Been Somewhere Around Here 17: At the Ventilator Shaft (Situated Directly Above) 18: The Low Support Beams Preventing Further Access 19: Success! And Fresh Air.
  16. History from Ojay's report: In 1946 Thurleigh became the site for the second Royal Aircraft Establishment site Two new runways were built in the post-war period to accommodate the Bristol Brabazon aircraft (which required a very long runway) that ultimately never went into production The site had several reasonably large windtunnels, one supersonic and one large subsonic It also had a 'drop tower', the drop tower is now used as a skydiving training venue The supersonic tunnel was dismantled by 2005 and the building which held the fans and driving motors is now used as the set for the BBC popular science programme, "Bang Goes The Theory" The RAE was deeply involved in the development of Concorde and was also a centre for the development of the Instrument Landing System. Thank You!
  17. Mailbox tunnel. September 2015.

    History Up until the late 60's, the royal mail parcel and lettering sorting offices were based in two buildings on Victoria Square, connected by a bridge spanning Hill Street, where they had been housed for almost 80 years. In 1970, a new, purpose-built, sorting office was constructed on the site of a former railway goods yard, adjacent to canal wharfs of the Birmingham and Worcester canal.Not only was it the largest building in Birmingham at the time, it was also the largest mechanised letters and parcels sorting office in the country. Coincident to this, the House of Commons passed a bill allowing an underground connection to be made between the new sorting office and New Street Station. A 400m long tunnel was constructed beneath Severn Street, which extended the existing underground tunnels at the station that already connected to the Victorian sorting office on Victoria Square.Upon completion, small electric trucks known as 'brutes' were able to pull cages full of mailbags straight off the trains, along the secure passageway, directly into the impenetrable structure of the sorting office.From there a network of lifts, chutes and conveyor belts distributed the mail through the building.It is rumoured that because the link was so secure, jewellers across the city would post their diamonds to themselves on a Friday evening, as it was cheaper than storing them in a vault over the weekend. Some of the other remaining mail tunnels, which sit below the platforms of New Street Station, are to be reopened as staff tunnels, allowing fast access from one side of the new station to the other. In 2011, the building was sold to Brockton Capital in a joint venture with Milligan and is currently undergoing renovation works, due to complete in spring 2015. These works represent another new chapter for the site. The Visit I got given a great opportunity to see these tunnels, so I headed down with a non member and we had a great time. Although it was only one tunnel, you had a great sense of what actually went on years ago. It was good to do something underground, as i'm usually up high or inside a hospital/manor . only thing i'd have to say about this place is it was abit weird to see parts of a huge Christmas tree down there! Thanks for looking:cool:
  18. History Torpantau - also known as Beacons or Beacon Summit Tunnel - claimed the record for the highest tunnel on the UK's standard gauge network - 1,313 feet above sea level. Reached by a three-mile climb from the south at 1:47 and 1:55, trains passed through it curving sharply to the right on a radius of around 20 chains before emerging onto the notorious Seven Mile Bank, a falling gradient of 1:37 towards Brecon. Torpantau Tunnel (Sometimes known as Devils Tunnel) is 666 yards in length and features a masonry arch springing either off shelves cut high into the rock face or lengths of brick or stone sidewall which were added incrementally over time as the need arose. Refuges are incorporated throughout. Closed on 4th May 1964, the line was only carrying freight. Passengers services across the B&MJR system has ended by January 1963. Thanks for looking
  19. History The Standedge Tunnels, which consist of four parallel passageways, are located beneath the Pennines in England. Two of the tunnels are former railway lines which now function as service ways, one is still part of the live main rail line, and the final one is a canal tunnel. The canal tunnel, the longest and the oldest of the four passages, was officially opened in 1811. The first single-track railway line wasn’t completed until 1848; it was constructed by the London and North Western Railway (LNWR). A second parallel tunnel was opened until 1871. The third and final railway tunnel which features double tracks; the one that is still operational today, was ready for use in 1894. All four tunnels are linked by adits (from Latin, meaning entrance) at strategic intervals, and these played an important role in the construction of the railway tunnels because waste could easily be removed from them and transported out via boat. Although the canal tunnel closed in 1943, during the Second World War, it was reopened in May 2001 and now features a visitor centre. To this day it remains the deepest, longest and highest canal tunnel in Britain, measured as being 16,499ft long (5,029 metres), 636ft (191 metres) underground and 643ft (196 metres) above sea level. Work initially began on the first tunnel in July 1795, and by mid-1796 727 metres had successfully been cut. In some sections track had been laid so that steam engines could be used to keep the works drained. Towards the end of 1797, excessive water began to impede on the progress being made, but the consulting engineer, Benjamin Outram, was awarded more funding, time and an increased rate per yard for completion, and by the middle of 1799, 910 metres of the tunnel had been finished, and a further 910 had been excavated. In the early 1800’s, however, progress slowed and eventually ceased because suitable contractors capable of carrying out the work were hard to find. Outram eventually left the project in 1801 after flooding damaged parts of the finished sections of the tunnel. Despite the misfortune, the Canal Company raised additional funding through a parliamentary act, and they were able to restart work. On 9th June 1809 the two ends of the tunnel finally met, but it wasn’t until two years after when it was declared fully operational. A grand opening ceremony took place on 4th April 1811 and a party of boats successfully completed the entire journey in one hour and forty minutes. Although the estimated costs for the canal tunnel had been £178,478, it cost only £160,000; this, however, still made it the most expensive canal tunnel ever built in England. Some money was saved where bare rock has been left exposed inside the passageway, meaning that it was only brick-lined in certain places. The working canal tunnel is only wide enough for one narrowboat and, unlike other canal tunnels in England, Standedge was built without a tow-path. Traditionally, all canal boats were towed by horse, but, instead, boats had to be ‘legged’ through Standedge by professional leggers who were paid six pence for working a boat through the tunnel; it would take one hour and twenty minutes to get an empty boat through and over three hours to get a fully loaded one to the other side. Inside, there are several ‘passing places’ because the tunnel was designed for two way traffic. This idea was, however, abandoned when boat crews were found to be too competitive. In spite of its popularity, by the 1940’s the tunnel had fallen into a state of disrepair, and with several blockages, it was deemed too unsafe for boats to navigate. The last boat passed through in 1948, despite the fact that the tunnel had officially closed in 1943. It was permanently sealed with iron gates to avoid any potential disasters. In the late 1990’s Standedge tunnel received £5 million as part of a restoration project, in efforts to reopen the entire canal. The instability that had been noted back in the 1940’s was found to be in the rock-lined areas which had not been brick-lined. These areas were stabilised using rock bolts and, in some places, concrete. While diesel engines were not permitted in the first few years of its reopening, due to fears surrounding the lack of ventilation, in September 2007 the trip boat Pennine Moonraker was taken through the tunnel under its own power; without the use of an electric tug boat. Since then, boats have been allowed to travel the length of the tunnel under their own power; although they must be accompanied by a chaperone on the boat, and are followed by a service vehicle in the parallel disused railway tunnel. The railway tunnels which run parallel to the canal are level throughout, and each was designed so that people could access the canal tunnel easily; so traditional steam engines could be supplied with fresh water without being forced to stop. Originally, only a single tunnel was constructed, but it proved to be a bottleneck for traffic moving in both directions. Subsequently, a second tunnel was constructed to alleviate this problem. Each of the tunnels are over 3 miles long (4803 metres). The 1894 double-bore tunnel opened to cater for newer high speed trains which were being developed and this is three metres longer than the single passageways. Overall, it is the fifth longest rail tunnel in England. The older tunnels offer an emergency escape route and provide emergency vehicles with road access into the hillside. Our Version of Events One again, it was late one evening as three of us drove off into the night. We were aiming for Marsden, a small village in West Yorkshire, in hope that we could find the Standedge Tunnels. These historic tunnels have been on the ‘to do’ list for quite some time now, and, since it was one of the lads birthdays, we decided to have a crack and see where we ended up. The night started well; eating pickled onion monster munch as the clock struck twelve, and although it was beginning to rain outside, our spirits were high. We arrived and tucked ourselves away in a nicely concealed parking spot to avoid any unwanted attention from the reception area at the tunnel entrance. Although all appeared to be quiet, a few lights were burning brightly inside the nearby building. Undeterred though, we ventured outside into the rain to check out the entrance and make a quick plan from there. Ten minutes later, with the plan in motion, I cunningly made a phone call as the others began to inflate the raft. As it would happen, the raft was very nearly fully inflated by the time I returned, so we quickly loaded our gear inside (a couple of oars, some camera equipment and a birthday cake), and as silently as we could manage, we carried the raft to the edge of the canal and carefully lowered it into the water. One by one we climbed inside, and avoiding the motion sensing security light outside the main reception, we drifted past noiselessly. The large iron gate was in sight and, quite effortlessly, after managing to avoid getting stuck beneath it or anything like that, we soon found ourselves surrounded by late 1700’s brickwork. It was pleasant inside, and the water was calm as we began to paddle into the unknown. The old brickwork lights up especially well under a drop of torchlight, and the shadows of ripples from the water shimmer nicely on the walls and ceilings. We paddled for a reasonable distance and hopped out here and there to check out some of the small passageways and adits branching off from the waterway. For the most part, our expedition was dry, save for a few leaking wall sections which sprayed water into the boat; at least until we reached a sort of waterfall. But, despite drifting along at quite a pace, we spied the cascading water early enough; so I was able to frantically fumble around to pack the camera away – trying to place it under something dry. We inevitably passed through the wall of water: and the end result? A large pool of water in the bottom of the dinghy and a soggy birthday cake… Nevertheless, quite undeterred we cracked on and managed to haul the raft up into one of the service tunnels. Once inside, we each enjoyed a quick slice of moist birthday cake and spent the next few hours wandering around the old diesel smelling passageways, trying to find the main line. So, overall, I’d say the night was a success and it was well worth getting a little damp to experience the full scale of the Standedge Tunnels – they certainly didn’t disappoint and lived up to our expectations. Explored with Ford Mayhem and Meek-Kune-Do. 1: The Beginning (Monster Munch in the Car) 2: Raft Inflated and Ready to Go 3: Drifting Inside the Tunnel (First Glimpses) 4: Standedge Canal Tunnel 5: Further on in the Tunnel (Getting a Good Pace On) 6: Brick Archways 7: Inside a Service Passageway 8: Looking Down a Small Service Tunnel 9: The SeaHawk II Turned into a Canal Boat 10: Moored at the Side 11: No Exit That Way 12: The Waterfall 13: Birthday Cake 14: Getting Stuck In 15: Jam Sponge Underground 16: The Service Tunnel (One of Them) 17: One of the Connecting Adits 18: Second Service Tunnel 19: Heading Towards the Mainline 20: The Mainline (Live Railway) 21: Emergency Telephone 22: Smaller Service Tunnel 23: White Crash Barrier 24: Adit Number 28 25: Where we Left the Raft 26: Back Inside the Raft (Heading Home) 27: Changes in the Brick/Stonework 28: Side Splashes 29: The Exit 30: A Steamy Situation
  20. So by now most of you have seen Raz's report, here my version of events Quick drive not so far from us and a walk through what i can only describe as a Jurrasic like British "rain forrest" by the side of the river Aire led us to a nice looking drain, it stank like hell and for a while im pretty much certain i was stood in raw sewage... great stuff Heres some photos; And to finish; a little light painting Cheers for looking
  21. Not exploring but a nice bit of underground http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3157960/Mexico-Top-drug-lord-Joaquin-El-Chapo-Guzman-escapes.html
  22. I've had my eye on this Silo for a few years as my girlfriend used to work not far from this site so I used to see it everytime I would go and meet up with her. I had a wonder about a few times with a friend but it always seemed very busy down there , anyway the whole place had shut down so I had to give it a go. it was a bit foggy but on a clear night you should be able to see for miles sorry to say its gone now but it was a good one for the very short time it was there. I found a small bit of info on the net sorry its not much .. Tunnel Refineries changed its name to Amylum which is the latin for Starch The 50 acre site at Greenwich processes crops such as wheat and maize and extracts starch. The starch is then converted into glucose syrup. The syrup is then forwarded into the food chain and appears in most processed foods that we eat. this is the fire escape you have to climb. its well fucked and you have to step over a big gap but it all adds to the fun
  23. UK Allt-y-Cefn Tunnel -2015

    Allt-y-Cefn Tunnel on the former Carmarthan & Cardigan Railway: 167 yards, opened 1864, closed 1973. As far as I know mine are the only internal pictures - may be wrong though! Left the flash in the car so this is all light painted with my head torch....... not my best. Pics & this is the bridge on the run up to the east end of the tunnel. Thanks for looking. Full set https://www.flickr.com/photos/infraredd/sets/72157652092878872/
  24. Belgium Ghost bus tunnel, feb 15

    My first underground explore, and i loved it. To bad there were a couple of Iphone explorers wandering around, who wanted to switch the light on :/ Kinda killing the atmosphere of an abandoned bus graveyard, but hey! It was nice, and maybe ill be planning a revisit. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7
  25. As The_Raw asked me so nicely heres a report even tho i posted some in photo of the day Wasn't going to do a report as to be honest after tails of PIR's being present we kinda expected when was triggered for loud alarms to go off,so we avoided the area. Baron kindly told us he set one off and we didn't go down as far as the old stairs leading up to a semi built station as there was a "chirping " noise which seemed to become more frequent as we got closer.Turns out if the pir does go off it just flashes so we could have cracked on,But after the effort getting in a joint decision was made to pack up and get back to the hotel and grab some sleep This is an unfinished metro system started in the 70's i believe and is now the home to much old junk and many buses and old trams! A few pics of what we did manage to cover.. Explored with Obscurity,Extreme Ironing,The-Raw and Monkey..waited a while to have another crack at shis so even tho we didnt cover a huge distance or find the light switch i came away happy with my lot
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