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Found 3,792 results

  1. One of my favorite sites, I just love this building with its stunning wood structure, shame the vandals keep try to torch it!
  2. Smudges 1st ever photographic report - may 2018 Smudges has been known by numerous other names over the years from The Crofters Arms Hotel to McGees to Moghuls Palace but has always retained it's charm and character. A true time capsule rotting away in the heart of Bolton. Featuring some stunning hand-carved bars and one of two of this type of revolving doors that exist the other located in a grand hotel in London. The Urban Collective We Film It... Thank you for checking out my pics guys! Clarky The Urban Collective We Film It...
  3. Hello everyone! I never used to post reports often. But over the last 3 days & joining this forum has put me into a real good mood and the feedback has been amazing!! Thank you all This was an explore i was not to sure about. I did not like the location and it had a spooky feel about the place! We had been inside around an hour and it was pitch black before we started hearing lots of noises and talking. I was a little worried it would be some "chavs" or "kids" smashing the place up with all the noise so we decided to leave. As we where leaving we bumped into a photographer and a model in a wedding dress. - This was my first time bumping into anyone on an explore! We spend about 30 more minuets inside before we moved on to the next location. A little history - The Fletcher Convalescent Home opened in 1893 and closed in 1998. It served as a hospital and during the war. (A tuberculosis hospital for the military) Since it closed the buildings have been subject to numerous planning applications, none of which have been successful. This building also features on the in the Victorian Society’s “Top Ten Endangered Buildings” list of 2008. Thanks for looking!!
  4. this second part nearly didnt happen as when i arrived i found the yard had changed hands and was all set to write it off as a waste of time and head home untill i spotted something in the far corner of the yard and sought permission to take some photographs which was given by way of intercom so off i trotted across the yard camera in hand to find my subject. mass transit was founded in May 1998 by Michael Strafford an engineering business, performing contract maintenance for other operators. It also specialised in the conversion of buses for non-passenger use. It then diversified into the operation of school bus services At the time operations ceased it operated 86 routes serving 32 schools and at its peak carried some 15,000 children a day to and from schools across south yorkshire and lincolnshire Between 2001 and 2005, Brightbus, then known as Mass Transit, had a substantial presence in lincolnshire following the acquisition of the bus operations of Applebys Coaches, Reliance Travel of great gonnerby and the grantham depot of lincolnshire roadcar. The Grantham operation failed under Mass ownership and was sold to centrebus and the Lincoln area operations to dunn line in 2005 In 2004, BrightBus purchased the long established Leon Motors of finningley that was formed in 1922 and operated buses in doncaster by 2008 the company's stage-carriage work had passed to first south yorkshire and concentrated on school contracts which were based at the main BrightBus depot at north anston mass/transit now brightbus disposed of the elderly leon and northern bus fleets which had kept the stage carriage and school services going and ran a fleet of 73 buses, including many English built three-axle dennis dragons and leyland olympians the dragons repatriated from Hong Kong. painted in what i thought was a very sickly green michael strafford retired at 55 stating ill health but didnt want to sell the business although he has disposed of the vast majority of the bright bus fleet possibly to other school or service bus operators . today the yard is in the hands of hallam express a logistics company full of lorries and fork lift trucks but a few of michaels buses are stored in the far corner of the yard all be it in a scrap state i think he is trying to sell these vehicles on for preservation rather than send them to booth roe or carlton PSV at barnsley he also still owns the former depot at leon wether these are to pass on to his family or he his hanging on for a better price i wouldnt know what i do know is like leon this marks the passing of another operator from the bus world. i acknowlage the author of the brightbus photos a rather scruffy mass transit bus possibly filling in between school runs heads for hexthorpe near doncaster a mixed group of bright buses mostly repatriated hong kong tri axles wait for the school run a wider view of the hong kong tri axles sandwich in a leyland olympian a hong kong tri axle MIL 55774 stands under the bus wash hong kong BIG 9823 which moved to leon finningley for a short time and C887 RFE parked at the rear of the yard near the inspection ramps viewed through the fence american schoolbus GHL 212 V in the yard as stated bright buses yard is now home to hallam express logistics lorries now park where buses once used to the former bus repair sheds now used for storage this is all that remains of brightbus a hong kong tri axle and a few scrap buses stored in one corner of the yard a side view of tri axle E537AKU and olympian W141 EON which spells leon the company brightbus aquired in 2004 the hong kong still retains its brightbus fittings and that of its previous company an interior view of the downstairs of hong kong looking down the bus it smelt like one of the museum type buses a unused shut in smell not unpleasant looking up the bus to be honest its in good condition and would make a runner again where as leon was in a deploreable state had to squeeze past rammels corner to get the interior shot SN53 KKH stands in pieces far from its london home although inside it could have just finished the days service came across this dennis dominator a long way from home formally with greys from ely complete with its cambridgeshire county council notice with junk dumped in its interior but wait all is not what it seems ...its colour and the sticker insider gives it away it was formally a magic bus based near piccadilly manchester the american schoolbus GHL 212 V is still parked up in the yard the interior and drivers seat tastefully redone ..... in moquet...yuck!! and as i take my leave the bus wash still exists but out of use mass brightbus still need fitters and the spirit of mass /brightbus continues to haunt the north anston industrial estate
  5. A early morning meet in Liverpool with @GK-WAX to try a few locations around the city that resulted in a few fails but can wait for another day. Then we decided on littlewoods.this one I have tried before with @telf and @whoopashooppa but didn't manage to get far so roll on a few years and I'm back again. Last time it was a bit of a fort knox so wasn't expecting to find a way in. Now yes it's stripped out but I enjoyed it especially up on centre tower roof on a sunny morning. So here's some history and photos. History... Architectural charity SAVE Britain’s Heritage welcomes new plans to save Liverpool’s most prominent Art Deco landmark, the huge white Littlewoods building that dominates the city’s eastern approach. Built in 1938 for Littlewoods’ famous football pools, the tall central clock tower and streamlined concrete profile are visib le far across Liverpool. The building housed the giant printing presses that sent millions of pools coupons across the country every week, to player s dreaming of winning a golden ticket. photos from SAVE Britain’s Heritage The National Lottery superseded the football pools, and the building has lain derelict for over a decade. English Heritage refused an application to list the structure and two redevelopment schemes have fallen victim to the recession. Earlier this year, local press reports warned that demolition was becoming increasingly likely as the structure fell into decline . SAVE responded by drawing national media and ministerial attention to the building’s importance , owned by the Homes and Communities Agency. SAVE P resident Marcus Binney accu sed N ational Regeneration A gencies of indifference to the building’s demonstrable architectural and historic significance. T he building was seen by sev eral million viewers when SAVE Deputy D irector Rhiannon Wicks appeared on the Alan Titchmarsh show in S eptember with Dan Snow, to highlight its plight . Now Manchester based developers Capital & Centric Plc have announced their intention s to buy the building . They are submit ting a planning application to Liverpool City Council to convert it into a hotel wi th commercial space. The new proposal, drawn up by Shedkm Architects , would see £16 million of private sector money invested in the refurbishment project , which could start on site summer 2013 . The project is thought to have won financial support from the mayoral City Deal fund. SAVE salutes the Mayor’s positive achievement in working with national government and the private sector in response to public opinion to secure the future of this important building. DSC_3040 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3066 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3065 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3064 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3063 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr url=https://flic.kr/p/JRoMB5][/url]DSC_3062 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3061 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3059 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3057 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3054 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3053 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3052 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3051 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3050 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3048 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3047 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3045 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3043 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3039 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3038 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3067 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  6. hi having finished a job fairly nearby it was time to do another one on my to do list that being clarborough railway tunnel. clarborough tunnel was built in 1850 and lies just over 2 miles from retford in nottinghamshire on the branch line of the sheffield to lincoln line which sees an hourly service between the 2 cities and occasional freight trains and is a site of special scientific intrest and houses clarborough nature reserve on top of the tunnel. proposed in 1844 and completed in 1850 by the manchester sheffield and lincoln railway ( MSLR) continues to trent junction where it joins the great northern and great eastern joint railway ( GN&GEJR) from doncaster and continues eastwards to cleethorpes via brigg and in a southerly direction to lincoln where it rejoins the east coast main line south of peterborough there was also a junction at clarborough which ran via torksey to sykes junction continuing on to lincoln and cleethorpes via market rasen this closed in 1959 but reopened in 1967 as far cottham to serve the power station all other freight traveling via gainsborough lea road . now a word of warning to would be explorers..... exploring live railway tunnels is not something to be approached lightly unlike dead tunnels they still have frequent trains running through them most are tucked out of the way and may be difficult to access but the main considerations are safety first dont do anything which would put yourself in danger and always be constantly on the look out for trains and most of all ensure you are not seen as nowadays they delay trains which incurs fines for the operator so BTP will not be sympathetic if you get caught and you may find yourself in front of the magistrate. that said clarborough tunnel is accessed fom church lane following the road for around a mile untill i found the line at cherry holt crossing on whinleys road a continuation of church lane my goal clarborough tunnel was around a quarter mile further on but not fancying playing dodge the train i parked the car at the locked crossing gates and set off on foot uphill again to find a way to the tunnel. passing cherry holt farm i attracted the attention of a rather loud doberman dog who proceded to follow me up the farmers field barking loudly being glad there was a large fence between myself and it walked in to the wood and nature reserve. following the main path through the wood i gained the nature reserve and found the ventilation shaft for the tunnel continuing on the right hand path found myself at the top of the east portal of clarborough tunnel. the next qustion was how to get down to it with a very steep bank and bushes after much probing found a gap and had to slide down the steep bank on my arse using my boots and grass as a brake eventually reaching the bottom and ensuring nothing was lurking walked towards the tunnel. an aproaching train caused me to take cover behind a retaining wall after which i spent around 20 mins photographing and deciding the best way out. not really fancying a 650 yard walk through the tunnel then a quarter mile to the crossing and not having a timetable it had to be the same way i got in but this time up the side of the tunnel bank and across the tunnel top and after much climbing got over the fence and rolled myself a fag while i regained my composure returning back through the reserve picked up a big stick lest my 4 legged friend should be around and find a way through the fence at least i,d got something to brain it with. there was no sign of the dog and thought it had gone in for its tea untill a large shape rounded the corner barking furiously yes my friend was back and continued to follow me down the field to much barking. leaving my walking stick at the crossing for someone else to use managed to grab a couple of train pictures to add to my report and another explore crossed off the list. cherry holt crossing the adventure starts here.... clarborough tunnel in the distance the signs warn engineers they are entering a site of scientific intrest and must obtain special permission to work here. the crossing access board clarborough tunnel ventilation shaft looking down from the top of the tunnel looking towards lincoln i came down the steep bank on my arse on the left first view of clarborough tunnel,s east portal from the embankment trackside safety first from here on in lantern repeater signal TN 835 (thrumpton) stands guard in the clear position at the tunnel portal clarboroughs tunnel board some nice beams in the tunnel roof that extend right through the tunnel which can be seen as they disapear into the darkness a tunnel marker looking outside the tunnel is quite wet in places a brick reccess and signal cable my reccess was cut in with a steel lintel above it blast on the roof from its steam days climbing back up the bank the top capping stones and brickwork a broken drain pipe looking down the banking at the track as a northern railbus scoots into the tunnel another view of the capping stones clarborough nature reserve is right on top of clarborough tunnel and extends the full length of the tunnel back at the crossing as 66740 and 017 top and tail a coal train from cottham power staion out of the tunnel came across these on my way back up church lane think they are something to do with the fun day ...beautifull babs windsor wallace and grommit love this one british strawberries and cream
  7. Smudges A.K.A The Crofters Arms Hotel and McGees first ever video report May 2018 The Urban Collective We Film It...
  8. Hi all, we are back already with another video! This time we had been tipped off of an abandoned Chinese resturant in Southampton and what an explore it was! It turns out that everything had been left behind although the place being slightly trashed. I couldn't find to much in regards to history of this place but I don't think it's too extensive but after looking at the reviews it seems pretty obvious why this place was closed down as it was stated as having terrible customer service and wasn't very hygenic. Hope you like the video, like always open to feedback. I am looking at getting new equipment to help with low light so please bear with me!
  9. Hi everyone! This is my footage of Battle Hospital in Reading. I visited in May 2018 and the explore went extremely well as we managed to search the entire site without any interruptions and oh my what a place to explore! A Little History The site was created in 1867 as a Workhouse which went on to be known as the Reading Union Workhouse. They added an infirmary to the site between the years of 1889 and 1892 which added the space for an extra 185 beds! Amongst the First World War it was then known as the Reading War Hospital. It was then in 1930 that it became Battle Hospital but it's not over quite yet as in 1952 they built a new maternity unit which was known as Thames Block and then in 1972 they built a new block called Abbey block so by 1993 Battle Hospital was able to accomodate 280 beds however this was not great compared to the 760 beds at Reading's other hospital, the Royal Berkshire Hospital. It was then in 2005 that Battle Hospital closed it's doors for the final time with all the patients being transferred over to the Royal Berkshire hospital in a new block which would be known as Battle block. Thanks for reading! Hopefully you found something of interest
  10. an early finish today prompted a visit to the former colliery site at manton and the sidings at manton wood after parking the car in manton pit wood park trying to look like an afternoon stroller and not an urban explorer a circuitous walk through manton pit wood was required to reach my goal and avoid the security cameras in the car park. after much huffing and puffing uphill through the trees i gained the main path about half wayup the pit tip another path led me around the side and down to the old trackbed when i discovered a flatter way and the tree cover was enough to hide what i was up to. climbing down the bank with a few choice oaths i gained the old trackbed of the former manton colliery. opened in 1898 manton was a 3 shaft colliery fully operational in 1907 in 1947 it was part of south yorkshire area not nottinghamshire closing in febuary 1994 manton was the 29th pit to close and the 8th pit in bassetlaw . the majority of mantons coal went to the CEGB power station at cottham but after the privatisation of of the electricity industry in 1990 and the dash for gas led to the pits demise. today the site is now owned by diy giant B&Q some bits of track still exsist as far as the other side of the retford road bridge the bridge itself is now fenced off as a dangerous structure and will possibly be removed at some point for scrap severing forever the former track into manton colliery i dont think that B&Q are really intrested in products being shipped in or out by train as the bridge over retford road would possibly have to be replaced ruling out trains ever running again at this location on cost grounds. the sidings at manton wood are still extant but see little use apart from the monday to saturday 17.35 east midlands trains service from nottingham which stables then runs round here to allow the northern rail sheffield to lincoln and lincoln to sheffield services to pass and use the platforms at worksop. 58029 prepares to leave manton colliery with a coal train to cottham power station the cripple wagon on the left awaits attention the same scene today looking towards manton colliery sees only bright orange B&Q trailers parked up awaiting loading for another journey sleepers and ballast litter the former trackbed near manton colliery two views of the former railway bridge that used to connect manton colliery to the main line along with its bridge board i doubt the safety of trains would be affected seeing as a train hasnt crossed this bridge for 24 years a security fence and padlocked gate declare retford road bridge an unsafe structure the rails end at a mound of ballast behind the camera the single to double track points still in place having done the batman routine (above) and ducked around the security fencing a small section being available here is the bridge decking with the track still in place not having seen a train for 24 years the bridge from the other side batman time again !!! the bridge from the main line end shows the track still connected but covered by a mound of ballast a rusty rail in the undergrowth beyond the trees a rusty rail in the grass continues towards the main line with another ballast pile just short of the main line continuing beyond the ballast the rail has either sank or collapsed at this point dolly signal wp270 protects the main line from phantom coal trains A 2 ..2car set passes manton wood signal box heading for sheffield possibly from cleethorpes via gainsborough the colliery access tracks in the foreground of the hut and the rear of the DMU. now overgrown and unused looking towards retford apart from the monday to saturday east midland trains 17.35 from nottingham which stables here then runs round to allow 2 northern services to pass...looking towards worksop and the occasional network rail train the signal box was where the boxes are now on the bankside the former manton colliery line turns right here the sheffield to lincoln main line is on the left and finally the network rail access board
  11. it was actually a last minute decision to visit this explore. en route home from doing the manton colliery explore i passed the fomer pumping station at bracebridge with a shall i or sha,nt i so a quick turn round of the car i squeezed in behind some twat in a skoda who thought it a very good idea to park across the entrance who then decided to move and the explore was on. Built in 1881 Bracebridge Pumping Station was part of Worksop's new sewage system. It used two steam-driven beam engines (together with a travelling crane) to pump the sewage to the effluent processing facility. The engine was coal-fired, with the coal being brought in from nearby Shireoaks Colliery by boat via the Chesterfield Canal. Like many Victorian pumping stations it was built with no little style, designed in an Italian Romanesque style including ornate cast-iron columns and a spiral staircase. Apparently these remain inside (the columns are most definitely visible on external view). Now Grade II Listed, the building along with 1.33 acres of land is currently bricked yp to prevent access so sorry no interior shots the old pumping station has been like this since it was refurbished many years ago there was talk of turning it into an attraction but nothing has happened yet and possibly wont do for the forseeable future the old pumping station viewed from high hoe road the old beds still filled with water one of the victorian columns can still be seen through the windowless building rising upwards towards the ornate chimney a closer view of the ornate victorian columns the base of the chimney from the back of the pumping house the rear of the pumphouse the rear of the pumphouse and chimney the middle of the chimney with the lightning conductor on the right the top of the chimney and the lightning conductor someone had gained access inside by a rope tied to one of the windows but feeling a bit cream crackered i didnt fancy the tarzan routine so i didnt bother
  12. Had a great afternoon exploring here, what a place. It’s huge!! I have been meaning to visit here for years & it certainly has fallen into disrepair over the years (since I've known about the place). I should have gone years ago! Must go back on a sunny/warmer day & hopefully next time we won’t get caught by the angry farmer/security guy 😉
  13. Visited back in Early Feb with Mookster and an American Explorer friend, who is over on an educational placement. We had quite a Northern Road Trip planned; with around 18 sites on our list, but sadly did about 4 or 5 over two days. Annoying but that's the nature of this beast! Cellars Clough Mill was originally owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead in Marsden, and opened in 1888. Sam also owned Holme Mill. By the 60s, it was owned and run by company Fisher, Firth & Co. which named the mill "Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd", managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has since been dissolved and the mill is believed to have closed in the 80s. Previous planning applications have been unsuccessful because it was discovered that bats were found to be residing insude mill. The bats cannot be forcibly removed, so the hope was that they would eventually move on. Wings of the mill have been demolished; presumably to let nature in and destroy the mill? #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157692916601562
  14. Not much online about this one, it used to be a smelting yard which also carried out other work such as Automotive and presumably welding of sorts. A nice little mooch for 45 mins or so. Its had a recent fire, unfortunately destroying quite a rare model of Datsun stored inside. Visited with Mookster and our American Explorer friend on a February Northern Road Trip. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157668230304678
  15. selwyn motors is an independent coach operator in the isle of axholme lincolnshire in the fairly remote village of belton between scunthorpe and gainsborough having previously done this yard a return to barry dodds was called for so a slight detour on the way home brought me to saxon lane selwyn motors is a difficult yard to find unless you know what you are looking for set back up a drive off the main road . started by his father in 1939 selwyns is an independant operator run by barry on his own predominatly a coach operator although he did have a service route 292 belton to doncaster which has ran for many years and was a saturday only 1 journey each way shopping service using the double decker which ended in december due to a new rule where the buses have to have flat platforms for disabled/buggy access added to this a cut in subsidy by north east lincs cc this rural service doesnt carry enough passengers to make buying a flat platform bus viable and with 2 way travel and isle doing the school contracts barry in his 70,s has decided enough is enough and was in the process of a re mot of the 53 seater to join the 49 seater available for private hire although 90% of the work has been done this vehicle still stands idle. almost every bus selwyns have ever had are at their yard many have been stood derelict for many years with trees and green moss growing either on them or around them refusing to sell his buses unless he can get the right kind of price for them it looks like a buses graveyard with the bus sheds and buses filled with all sorts of unimaginable crap.... barry selwyn dodd gives nothing away. if you like this post check out my other bus posts. one of the original buses in the name of E.R dodd mwb 310 a 1950 bedford ob previously owned by roevilles of stainforth now 68 years old still stands in the shed at selwyn motors along with ex wallace arnold aua 435 J.. a 1971 aec reliance passed to dodds in 1976 435 stands at christchurch when she was in service with the saturday afternoon return service to belton OJD138 R ...a leyland fleetline fe30agr new to london transport as dms2138 in 1976 stands at christ church the bus stands themselves now long since gone far from its london home 138 sits among the vegetation and assorted clutter in the peacefull lincolnshire countryside still with its original 292 blind now filled to the brim with clutter retired due to broken springs hsv 126 ex wallace arnold passed to wray of harrogate joined selwyns in 1994 and 23 years on it still retains its wray livery this has on one occasion filled in for the metrobus on the 292 90% completed 126 just needs a few more jobs doing before she can return to service DDB 169 C a 1965 daimler fleetline new to north western as 169 shortly returning to belton via sandtoft having been stood many years is in a very derelict state hardly any paint remains but uncovers it greater manchester origins another bus filled with crap 844 FKX a DAF nothing else is known about this vehicle apart from it used to do selwyns contract to axholme school before the advent of 2 way travel sits derelict among its companions awaiting resurection. R681 WRN formally R60 RED a volvo 49 seater was selwyns latest and possibly final aquisition leaves axholme school epworth on completing a private hire job for the school awaits its next job the majority of its work is now rail replacement jobs and occasional school trips out
  16. History (GWSR.COM) Hunting Butts tunnel often gets overlooked but it is the shorter of the two tunnels on the Honeybourne Line. It has track laid through it and it is used to store rolling stock although the Cheltenham end of the tunnel is fenced off with a robust steel palisade. Hunting Butts tunnel is just 97 yards long and was originally envisaged as a deep cutting. However, this would have severed the gallops then used by the new racecourse so, perhaps with an eye on future revenue afforded by the racecourse the GWR agreed to build the tunnel and it was completed in the Autumn of 1904. Cheltenham Race Course station was completed in 1912; six years after the line had opened throughout. The Honeybourne Line was effectively closed in 1976 following a freight train derailment on what is now known as 'Chicken Curve' north of Winchcombe, probably because of movement in the embankment. This is a problem that has beset this location since the 1920s and in January 2011 finally collapsed, severing the line. No through trains traversed the route after that date and it was officially closed later November 1976. In 2010 the trackbed was replaced and is now used to store rolling stock. Pics Thanks for looking
  17. leon motor services were formed in 1922 and ended in 2004 when it was sold to mass transit/brightbus which is another of my to do yards. leons main stage carriage route was the 191 doncaster to finningley services which they worked daily for 82 years with additional services serving the outlying villages of wroot and misson on doncaster market days of tuesday friday and saturday . the other core of leons work were school services and the coaching side of the business with day trips and holidays in the uk and abroad and also private hire work with a booking office in doncasters south bus station for many years towards the end leon also took up contract work as a long established operator on the 152 to skellow joint with yorkshire traction and a service to west bessacar as well as other local doncaster services & schools on contract to the local authorities . the last time i visited the sheds were shared with brightbus today it is a very sad sight as the pictures show with the vandals smashing what they can even a bus stored in the garage and abandond rubbish all over the site and nature starting to reclaim part of the yard it marks the sad passing of one of doncasters last true independent bus operators visited in april 2018 18 months after the demise of its parent company brightbus. one of leons more elderly buses waits at its turn around point at wroot with a market day service to doncaster as stated leons core route was the 191 service between doncaster and finningley here ORR 263 L leaves doncaster southern bus station to return to finningley a leon line up at the depot with various atlanteans note the advertisement for brockholes farm riding centre this is now the yorkshire wildlife park. after 82 years doncasters last long serving independent bows out the depot is now in the hands of mass/brightbus mass schoolbuses stand alongside leon service buses on the depot forecourt. the present view shows the depot empty and abandoned the long bus shed has gone and the offices on the right hand side have also been demolished. even the diesel pumps have attracted the attention of the vandals. leon optare metrorider M926 TYG stands at the warning tongue lane turning point en route to west bessacarr the turning point still exists but is no longer used and a stones throw from the main entrance of what is now the yorkshire wildlife park . 926 sits sadly dumped in the undergrowth at the depot still in its leon livery. great risk to my legs and you should see the scratches i decided to get some interior shots of 926. after removing all the crap i managed to get a shot of 926,s rear panel showing her sad legacy. 2 of leons fitters pose for the the camera outside the repair shed with 733 and a unidentified daimler over the pits now boarded up and abandoned. 2 leon deckers rest at the side of the garage and some beautifull bedford coaches with plaxtons bodywork.. now just a rubbish tip. the wash ramp at the side of the depot now full of rubbish and barrels the final two pictures show the rear of the depot and the damage caused by vandals to a stored bus when they broke into the pit shed this has now been re secured .
  18. About 3 months after he fractured his spine, I went down to Nailsworth to visit my friend Oort. After a quick coffee and a catch up, we headed straight to the mine for Oort's first mooch after his accident. Not much online. The early history of these quarries is vague. Presumably quarrying of the fine oolite stone has been carried on at the outcrop since Roman times. Due to the steep hillsides, the overburden soon became too great and thus they went underground. There are a number of small scale developments. According to a 90 year old inhabitant of Nailsworth, a Mr William Mortimer who died in 1970, such places were worked in the winter months by cottagers employed in casual agricultural work during the summer. Graffitti dating 1900-1947 (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) Cheers for Looking
  19. mass/brightbus was the parent company of leon purchased in 2004 and stated in my leon post one of my other to do yards as this would be a very lengthy report and so as not to spoil the present report i have decided to split this in to 2 parts the mass/brightbus depot was located on houghton road of the north anston industrial estate some 12 miles from sheffield and were operators of local school bus contacts and a few stage carriage services. but this yard has a history that goes back even further than mass/ brightbus as it was originally the yard of a former employer of mine northern bus or the northern bus company as it was offically known. northern bus was formed during the 1986 deregulation era by duncan roberts northern bus challenged south yorkshire transport on the dinnington to sheffield bus corridor resulting in syt handing all services over to the independent northern bus who ran all sheffield services from dinnington interchange to sheffield interchange and meadowhall along with school contracts for the local authority. northern bus also ran cross border services between sheffield and worksop in nottinghamshire on the service x85 sheffield to halifax x38 and also challenged a yorkshire traction /west riding alliance on service x32 to leeds with a variation of bristol VR,s bristol RE,s and service coaches for the x32 service everything bought second hand mostly from crosville in around 2001 northern bus was sold to a bus engineering company called mass transit later to become brightbus who took over the school contracts and stage carriage work for a short while longer. as i said so as not to spoil the next part of the report i will leave the story there and continue it under mass/brightbus but leave you with some delightfull pictures of northern buses in service. former crosville bristol RE HRN 108 N stands VOR at north anston depot awaiting repairs or being stripped for parts note the roof from the open top bus alongside. another former crosville coach 222 WFM stands at north anston with 85 sheffield on the blind this was the cross border south yorkshire/nottinghamshire service to worksop in company with a RE which had been to rotherham. looking like it has had bodyshop attention elderly ex crosville bristol RE EFM 178 H parked at the depot alongside interloper bristol VR HTU 159 N itself from crosvile liverpool formerly DVG 270 N bought by another school contractor and coach operator jhonson brothers from hodthorpe derbyshire possibly in for repair during the mass era.
  20. History Brampton Park Officers' Mess is a former country house, then used by RAF Support Command at RAF Brampton. Brampton Park dates back to the 12th century and the house, known as the Grange, was built in 1821-22 to designs by Thomas Stedman Whitewell. It was altered in 1825 by John Buonarotti Papworth. The main part of the house burned down in 1907 and was rebuilt and extended on the east side in red brick to form a symmetrical design. The south facade is constructed from yellow brick and the roof is tiled. The north front of the house incorporates one of the surviving 19th Century wings as its west end and the 19th Century Pump Room survives on the first floor of the north-west wing. During the First World War, the house was used to house German prisoners. At the beginning of the Second World War it was used as the 'Sun Babies Nursery', to house about 100 infants evacuated from North London. In 1942 the house was taken over by the United States Army Corps (HQ 1st Air Division) until 1945-6. In late Spring 1945, Headquarters Technical Training Command moved to Brampton from Shinfield Park. The Grange became the headquarters and the personnel were billeted in the Park. The house was used as the headquarters of various RAF Command and Group Headquarters from 1955 onwards. In 1982 the upper floor of the building was damaged in a fire and in 1987 a refurbishment programme was carried out on the house, completed in 1988. In 2012 RAF Brampton was put for disposal by the Ministry of Defence. The Explore Visited with @hamtagger this had been one we had wanted to visit for a little while and not too far from us either. Pleasantly surprised about the location, still had a RAF feel to it especially over the back of the area where the married quarters are still lived in but the vast majority of the site has been demo'd with masses of new houses built on site to replace the old MOD buildings. What is left is enough though with quite a lot of the features retained, as you will see from the above history part of it burnt down some time ago so I would guess thats why half of it is relatively modern in design. This was one of the most leisurely explores I have had. Having heard that people have had the police rung and escorted off, locals keeping their eyes open for people coming and going we were pretty lucky. In and out unnoticed, just how I like it! Anyway, the pics. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Thanks for looking!
  21. The Explore I actually explored this about eight weeks ago with Southside. I drove to Slough, Parked up and he had kindly found the way in before I got to the University Campus. The site is massive, and right in the centre of Slough. I work fairly close to Slough, and had seen the site some weeks before when collecting lunch from Roosters Piri Piri just opposite the site. It's kind of strange that its sat here for so long; its very close to London and land in this general area is typically very, very expensive. That does not of course, make Slough a pleasant place... I think there was a bit of an increase of traffic here after my visit, I have only just got around to editing these! Its amazing how such a large site has sat beneath the radar for such a long time!!! The Site Thames Valley University or TVU as its known; is part of the University of West London and formed part of a conglomerate of several campuses in Reading and West London. The closure of this Campus was announced in 2009 and the doors finally closed it's doors in 2010. The site has now fallen into disuse and it's 1000 students had to re-locate to other campuses around West London. Closure was blamed on the recession/credit crunch at the time; forcing the sale of the site. "Professor Peter John, TVU vice-chancellor, said: 'For the majority of students the closure of the campus will mean a move to one of our other locations either in Reading or West London. All those affected will be fully supported through the transition to minimise any possible disruption to their studies.' A total of 650 pre-registration nursing students at the Slough campus will be provided with a provisional timetable and have been told to pack their bags for the move to Reading by December this year." The site consists of two tower blocks (7 stories high), a ground floor canteen, a small circular building named "The Rotunda" which houses the University's Srudent Uninon, and a 2 story admin block. Plans were announced in 2017 to redevelop the site into 1,400 homes, but so far nothing has happened. Currently the site is owned by the Slough Council. It was a surprisingly relaxed explore. The road outside was very, very busy and all could be heard on the street outside. There were incredibly recent signs of a squat inside one of the rooms; fresh new sleeping bags and food dated for that day in bags; sandwiches, fruit etc. I could hear someone inside who I believe left when they heard us. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 #25 #26 #27 Thanks for reading! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157696167343975
  22. Another explore from a massive backlog of explores! This one is from late January 2018; my first meeting with James Smith, having been talking on Facebook and Urbex Forums for practically ten years! Those who know me, know I have a love for older and retro vehicles. I had taken a drive to Derbyshire to pick up a spare Automatic Gearbox for my 1988 Volvo 240 as it was going cheaply and you never know! After collecting; I decided to give James a bell and he very kindly took me to some local sites! Permanite Asphalt was incorporated in 1989 and later became known as Ruberoid; part of the IKO Group. According to Companies House, they were dissolved on 2 September 2016. The pictured business in Matlock, manufactured Asphalt Products such as roofing sheets. It also involved the mixing of aggregate, bitumen and sand. Powdered limestone – which is still very much apparent, like a thick dust throughout the main tower. This Limestone was mixed with hot bitumen emulsion and poured into moulds before being left to cool. The site was regulated by the local Derbyshire Dales District Council on the following conditions: The heating of tar or bitumen is regulated under section 6.3 of the Environmental Permitting Regulations. The following activities are regulated as Part B processes: Heating, but not distilling, of tar or bitumen in connection with any manufacturing activity, or oxidising bitumen by blowing air through it, at plant where no other activities described in any Section in this Schedule are carried on. The undertaking of the activity must be likely to involve the use in any 12-month period of 5 or more tonnes of tar or bitumen or both in aggregate. Originally, the site was part of the larger Cawdor Quarry complex. It is suggested that the factory closed sometime around 2009 but information is pretty thin on the ground. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157690278494090
  23. So on the same day that I first went to the Cop Shop in Brentwood, Essex, we decided to drive 20 miles to the disused Police Station in Witham. It was OK, but probably not worth the extra driving. It was more of a cottage design inside. Quite a nice relaxed explore though and had water and heating. I think this was closed as part of the massive cost cutting operation in Essex, but there isn't a huge amount of history. Witham was closed before Brentwood, and the Police Department vacated in April 2016. closed in April 2016 In December 2017; the former Police Station was put up for sale with a guide price of £875.000 but was eventually sold early 2018 for £1.6million planning permission has been submitted to convert the site into a nursery school keeping all the outside features in place and nothing to be demolished. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157668348539988
  24. St Josephs Orphanage / Mount Street Hospital Even though this location has already been done by every man and his dog, I decided to chuck a quick report up anyway. As stated above in the title of my report, this one features photographs taken mostly on the first visit and one taken on another which will become clear towards the end. History St Joseph's Orphanage was designed by architect R.W Hughes in the style of gothic architecture, which was typical of that particular era. The construction work was endowed by Maria Holland, a wealthy widow, who contributed a sum of 10,000 to achieve this. She wanted to care for the sick, at a time when Preston had the highest mortality rate in the UK. This was predominately due to inadequate housing and the poor working conditions in the local mills and factories. The orphanage was first officially opened in the September of 1872 and five years later it became St Joseph's Institute for the Sick & Poor. The hospital accommodated for around 25 patients and was run by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady Mother of Mercy. Voluntary contributions funded the maintenance and general upkeep of the hospital and it was also the first provider of welfare to Roman Catholic girls in Preston. In 1910 the hospital was granted its first operating theatre, as well as the chapel being built that same year. By 1933 a new wing was added and another in 1958 which was officiated by Princess Marina, the Duchess of Kent. During both world wars it served as a military hospital to treat wounded British and Dutch soldiers. One of St Joe's most famous patients was performer George Formby who died of a heart attack at the hospital in 1961. The hospital eventually closed its doors in 1982. It was then bought by its current owner who converted it into a care home until 2003. A year later in 2004, plans were proposed to convert the building into 82 flats with a grant of £2m but the redevelopement never seemed to happen. Presently 3 sections of the site are still classified as grade II listed and the building was recently featured on the Victorian Society's 'top most at risk historic buildings in the UK.' Visit Visited with @scrappy. This one has been on my to do list since I really started exploring but I never got round to doing it until recently. Despite being pretty fucked from years of neglect, local kids, general arseholes etc, I did still quite enjoy seeing this one finally. The main purpose of my visit was photographing a newly discovered section which certainly didn't disappoint, as well as the operating lights being rather pretty too (so glad no one has smashed those up yet.) All in all still a fairly nice location and worth popping by if you're in the area. As always, hope you enjoy my report! Started tidying up my photos of the chapel and went a little overboard... (Obligatory hospital wheelchair photo...) Now onto the best part Once we found out all the doors had been mysteriously removed we decided to go back again for more photos. If you've got this far, thanks for reading!
  25. Visited with Mookster on a small short road trip around the midlands back in March. This site was absolutely wrecked throughout and of little interest. An 80s style factory which closed sometime in 2016. But it was still an explore! James Thomas Engineering was started in a small garage in Bishampton England in 1977. The business grew and moved to a converted office unit, to a much larger 5000 square foot unit in 1980. This planted the seeds for a new industry leader in aluminium all purpose truss design. By 1983, James Thomas developed a pre-rigged truss design used by major rock bands on world tours. By 1990, JTE began manufacturing in the USA to keep truss design moving on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Come 1992, the super truss system was designed. The Company was Liquidated in 2017 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157694367095931
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