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Found 65 results

  1. A piece of British WW2 History hidden under a hillside. HMS Forward, a maritime intelligence centre, was key to monitoring the English channel and and was heavily involved in D-Day. Although it's fallen into dereliction, attempts to restore and maintain it have been carried out by 'Friends of HMS Forward'. History HMS Forward was the Royal Naval HQ, setup up on the 20th of June 1940 in the Guinness Trust Holiday Home. It had responsibility for units along the south cost, including: HMS Marlborough - Eastbourne HMS Aggressive - Newhaven HMS New - Newaven HMS Vernon - Roedean HMS Lizard - Hove The tunnels of HMS Forward began life in March 1941 after an Admiralty direction that ordered channel ports to setup facilities to maintain naval plots and created the need to securely house equipment for plotting and communications. It was decided to built a network of tunnels into the a hillside of South Heighton for operations to take place from. HMS Forward was designed by Lt. Col. F.H.Foster, Commander of the Royal Engineers, and built by the 1st Tunneling Engineers Group and No 172 Tunneling Company. They were completed on the 14th of November 1941. At the time they were a state of the art facility and were kitted out for every eventuality. This including backup power generator and full air conditioning systems with gas filters. They had chemical toilets, sleeping cabins and a gallery. Although the toilet were for emergencies only and it was noted that he veterans who worked here didn't even have knowledge of these toilets. The labyrinth of tunnels had an East and West entrance. The West entrance by the main road was the main entrance. The East entrance was under the West wing of the Guinness Trust Holiday Home (now demolished). There were two Pill boxes at the top of the hill that were accessible from inside the tunnels, but were demolished long ago. During its operational period between November 1941 and August 1945, the tunnels of HMS Forward carried out many key maritime operations. It monitored the English channel from Dungeness to Selsy Bill using ten radar stations from Fairlight to Bogner Regis. It was heavily involved with D-Day as well as nightly raids on the occupied french coast. The Explore A very nice explore in a very nice set of tunnels. They are quite extensive and is quite the maze, however once you get your head round the layout its impossible to get lost. Its quite a shame that such an important piece of history has been left to rot. This is somewhere that really needs to be preserved for future generation. I'd heard that there was intention to turn it into a museum some time ago, but plans for this got scuppered by the local residents up top. It was clear that there was once some kind of open day as there were still laminated signs and notices left up by the 'Friends of HMS Forward'. Photos The West entrance with signs and notices from a previous open day / tour. Looks like it was a good few years ago though. You can see here what looks like a machine gun nest in the brick wall as you turn the very first corner. The large security gate of the West entrance. The long 100m West adit tunnel looking towards the east end. Looking from the East end of the West Adit. The two tunnels going left and right just before are the stairs up to the South and North Pill boxes. Looking up what remains of the stairs to the Northern Pillboxes. It is possible go up to the top of these, but its been sealed up at the top with rubble. The West Airlock. The Air conditioning plant room and standby generator room. The standby generator was a large diesel JP Lister engine. This provided 400V/230V power at 22Kw. Exhaust was piped through to the annex at the back of the engine room where it was exhausted through the ceiling too the surface through a 4" pipe. The start of the operational rooms of the tunnel. The room on the left side is the TURCO Office, and looking right down the long tunnel is down the length of the main tunnel with sleeping cabins. T.U.R.C.O stands for Turn Round Control Organisation, used to 'Assist naval shore authorities in the quick turn around of ships and craft'. The East gallery was used for sleep accommodation, switchboards and coders. The GPO Voice frequency equipment room. The pits in the floor are to fit the equipment in, as the modems were over 8ft tall. Looking down the East Galley and into the Teleprinters room. Looking down the the far end of the plotting rooms. The sleeping cabins. There were 4 of these for personnel on the night duty and split watches. Looking up towards the mock hen house, sealed at the top of course. The stairs up to the eastern entrance with pit at the bottom to slow down would-be invaders. The gate on the way to the East entrance. The remains of a second gate. Thanks for reading!
  2. Well here goes a first report on here since i joined in 2013, completely forgetting i had created an account so please accept my delayed apologies for being inactive... I visited this place in 2014, so a while ago now... hence why the pictures are how they are . After an epic road trip up north, we returned to our hometown and had an opportunity for something we had been working on for a while. Exhausted from lack of sleep and driving many miles, we were not going to miss this window of opportunity and visited the place before it was no longer doable. Really not sure on the history of the place, possibly built as wine vaults? Unable to find any records of it to be honest, it was really a right place at the right time thing. I believe it was at some point used as a youth club, then left vacant for a number of years and last i heard it was a gym. Unsure of the current situation, would like a revisit with the new camera and glass but beggars cant be choosers eh!! Visited with non members JDY and xcon2icon. Access at the time was a walk in the park, and ive not seen it posted before so hoping its something that isn't the monotonous same old stuff for people to look at either, despite the lack of decent pictures!! Really not the most exciting evening, no security, no nosy neighbors, no drama! Thanks for looking!!
  3. History The construction of Caversham Tunnel, now a disused railway tunnel that was cut through a solid sandstone embankment, began in September 1871 in the Kaikorai Valley. Cutting work began on the Caversham side around the same time, but construction of that side of the tunnel did not begin until March 1872. Both sides were joined in almost perfect alignment on 26th September 1872. The 865-metre-long tunnel was fully completed by late February 1873, and a celebratory dinner was held to commemorate the occasion. The tunnel was officially opened for service by Sir Julius Vogel, the eighth premier of New Zealand (prime minister), in December 1873. A party made the first excursion of the line from Dunedin to the Green Island terminus which was located near the coal pits of Messrs Sampson and Brown. A celebratory luncheon was held in a nearby field on the same day. The first passenger service was run on the line in July 1874, from Dunedin to Green Island terminus. A one-way ticket cost fourpence, while a return-journey cost sixpence. Additional links, such as one to Balclutha via the Chain Hills, were later opened at the end of the 1870s. For the time it was operational, however, the tunnel is said to have claimed a total of three lives. In 1876, a Green Island police constable named Henry Vernon was hit by a train while walking through the tunnel. Later, in 1897, a farmer named Kenneth Kennedy fell from a train while it was passing through. And finally, in 1900 an assistant guard named Robert Burns slipped from the train while moving between carriages in complete darkness inside the tunnel. In spite of the seemingly high mortality rate, the service was used up until 1910, when a larger replacement dual line took over all rail traffic. The replacement line sits a few hundred metres away from the original Caversham Tunnel. Over the next few years the tunnel remained closed to the public and was almost forgotten, until there was a flood in 1923. Unfortunately, the deep cutting and tunnel provided a drainage conduit for the Kaikorai Stream which had burst its banks. As a result, the water was guided straight into the large flat areas of South Dunedin. Hundreds of people were forced to evacuate their homes, and many lost valuable possessions. It is reported that drainage issues with the tunnel were addressed at the outset of World War Two, when the tunnel was fitted out as an air raid shelter that could be used by the public in the event of an attack. After the war, ownership of the tunnel passed to the council. It was used during the sixties to lay electrical cables and sewage lines; however, the structure itself has since been left to slowly deteriorate. Lacking any means of proper drainage has resulted in the tunnel filling with thick mud and water, and it is now deemed a dangerous structure. To keep people out, the council erected a barbed wire fence around the Kaikorai Valley side, and a large gate on the Caversham portal. Although there have been talks to convert the tunnel into a pedestrian walk/cycleway, with locals offering to pay for the lighting, all formal proposal have been rejected due to ‘theoretical cost estimates’ and ‘drainage problems’. Our Version of Events After a long night of drinking ale and whisky, we were hungover as fuck as we made our way over to Caversham to seek out the legendary ‘secret tunnel of Dunedin’. According to local legend, the tunnel was said to be nestled among trees and concealed by the motorway. It took a fair bit of faffing around to find the exact location of the tunnel, and a little bit of running along the motorway (thankfully the motorways here are a lot different to European ones). With no footpath and a sharp drop to our right, we had to carefully choose a quiet moment and hit legs. With our vision slightly blurred, and everything swaying ever so slightly, we tried to keep our focus on the white painted line on the road as we jogged. With the taste of ale steadily returning to our mouths, jogging is all we could manage. By the time we reached the entrance to the tunnel, sweat was dripping from us. The post-alcohol effect was in full swing, but we were keen to get the tunnel under our belts. I stood in front of the wire fence and gazed up at the barbed wire fixed across the top for a while. I was waiting for it to stop moving so I could perhaps think about climbing over. The fence was spinning a little bit too, and no matter how hard we held it, it just wouldn’t stop moving. Eventually, though, we managed to get onto the other side. We headed down a set of old decayed wooden steps. They were covered in foliage and, consequently, we stumbled our way down them as some of them had completely disappeared altogether. At the bottom we reached a large number of pipes poking up from the floor, and a small hut just to the left of us. These, as we quickly discovered seemed to be part of Dunedin’s sewage system. Unfortunately, it was at that precise moment we became sober enough to notice the bubble-guts syndrome had begun. We were going to have to make this a quick explore, before nine pints of arse soup demanded to be set free from the trap doors. Stumbling over sewage pipes seemed to bring the sensation on ever more, so it was time to squeeze the cheeks together, tightly. One slight stagger over a pipe or tree root and that would be it. Disaster. Entering the tunnel itself wasn’t difficult from here. But, the reports about the mud certainly don’t exaggerate. The sludge was incredibly sticky and we very nearly lost our boots to it. The floor in the first sections resembled a swamp, and in parts was almost at welly breaching point. It’s was almost as if the sewage pipes were leaking… Things got a little easier further on though, for some of us. With the help of a very handy handrail on the right hand wall, The Mexican Bandit was able to climb onto a ledge of raised mud that seemed to have solidified. Using the slightly rubbery feeling ‘handrail’, which was caked in years of slimy grime, he made quicker progress. He continued like this for quite a few metres, leaving us swamp dwellers far behind, until something caught his eye. Squinting, to properly focus his vision in the dark conditions, he could make out a sign plastered onto the ‘handrail’. It read either ‘DANGER 600 VOLTS’, or ‘6000’. In the heat of the moment, his vision was playing tricks on him, adding zeros to the situation, but he swiftly let go in any case. Apparently wellies are excellent at preventing electrocution, but I guess he didn’t want to test that theory out. For the most part, Caversham Tunnel is a bit samey throughout. It’s a very different style to the railway tunnels we have in England though, so it felt quite unique being all natural rock rather than Victorian brick. There was a small brick section around 400 metres into the tunnel though, and for a very brief moment excitement made the hangover subside. Upon discovering that the brick section was more like an underground bridge, however, disappointment set in and the battle to hold the ale inside ensued once more. There were other interesting features of course, such as the millions of seashells which littered the floor (the swamp ends halfway through, and the remainder of the tunnel is relatively dry). They were all different shapes and sizes, but I have no idea why they were there. The final interesting feature to add to the growing list would be the sewer we found that runs beneath the main passageway. We’d managed to stumble across a semi-broken lid, so decided to have a peek inside to see if there was anything interesting. And behold, there was: Dunedin’s shit floating about right beneath our feet. And to be perfectly honest, whatever you’ve been eating Dunedin, you need to stop… Explored with Nillskill and The Mexican Bandit. South Dunedin Flood (1923) 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14:
  4. The History The railway tunnel, opened in 1848 by George Stephenson and the York & North Midland railway company, ran 400 yards directly below Langcliffe Avenue from the A61 Leeds roundabout to the opposite side of Tewit Well Road. Initially, the locals opposed the railway being built, so the tunnel was built around the railway to keep it out of sight. The branch from Brunswick tunnel and the station was then abandoned after 14 years in operation. The abandoned tunnel was later converted into an air-raid shelter during WW2, with steps leading down to it from the Leeds road roundabout area. A concrete floor had been laid with a 6ft high brick wall lining the tunnel, and the remains of makeshift toilet cubicles in the four corners of the shelter were present. The air-raid shelter finally became abandoned in 1943 due to the bombing of The Majestic Hotel in 1941. The tunnel is mostly free from vandalism, apart from some minor graffiti which dates as far back as the 1970's. The indents on the ground from the sleepers are still evident, and the portal has 2 fixed metal grills to allow bats to use the tunnel. The Explore I explored this one with @plod, and another time with some non-members. after spending hours on research and putting together a detailed map it actually turned out much easier to find than we had anticipated. Getting to the entrance was pretty tricky though (as well as actually accessing the tunnel) and when we arrived it soon became clear that our £8 wilko torch was not going to cut it, so with this place being pretty local we decided to do a more detailed explore in a return visit Even with the return trip & better torches my camera really struggled with the poor lighting so picture quality isn't its best. We knew that the tunnel was basically a straight line so we headed right towards the end where we came across a wall with a doorway. Through here was an empty brick room with toilet cubicles in the corners, and past that room through the opposite doorway was a staircase leading to a pile of rubble underneath the Leeds Road roundabout, which had been dug into by the workmen in the 1960's who didn't know it was there, so sadly that's as far as we could go. This is a neat little place in Harrogate that not many people actually know of.
  5. History ‘Boxed In’ is likely to be part of the Etherley Dene Colliery. Although the specific history is rather vague, evidence suggests this was the closest mine in the nearby vicinity, and it was one that was spread over a considerable amount of land. Traditionally, coal was mined in the Bishop Auckland area for a long time, and there are numerous references to coal mining in the area in terms of place and street names. Therefore, the likelihood we ended up in a former coal mine is high. The colliery first opened sometime in the mid-1800s, when the industry was said to be booming, by R. Atherton. It was sold to Quarry Drift Colliery Ltd. in the 1920s, and later to the National Coal Board in 1947. The mine was closed in the early 1950s when the main coal seam dried up and it became unfeasible, economically, to continue operations at the site. Most of the mine was filled in in parts, for safety reasons, and its entrances all sealed. Throughout its entire history there were only five fatalities reported at this colliery; although, records are reported to be missing. All of the individuals who were in the register were either crushed to death or fell from a height. Our Version of Events After spending one too many nights smoking ‘reefer’ and drinking with the locals of Bishop Auckland, we heard rumours of a cave – ‘Smokies Cave’, as they all referred to it. After spending several minutes listening to them explaining how big the place was, and how you could still access multiple levels, we decided it would be worth seeking out. Unsure whether ‘Smokies Cave’ really existed or not, we set off late the next afternoon to find it. Unfortunately, though, as we had no transport, other than one bicycle, we ended up hiking seven miles to reach it. Much to our disappointment, after a fairly thorough search, we failed to find the elusive cave on this first excursion. A few days later, we decided to try again. This time we resolved not to dawdle and reached the area much more quickly. After a further thirty minutes walking aimlessly around a patch of woodland, we stumbled across a reasonably sized inflow concealed behind a large concrete wall. It was an old cylindrical structure constructed of large stones. Having deduced that the old mine may be accessible via this old culvert, and agreeing that this looked like a worthwhile explore anyway, we decided to enter the culvert. To begin with, it was an inviting explore, as it had a perfect stone lined floor and minimal stooping was required. What is more, there was very little water flow and no dirty debris, so having not brought waders with us we were happy chappies indeed. It took a good few minutes to pass through the nice stone culvert, until we reached an opening to our left, which we assumed was ‘Smokies Cave’. Unsure whether to proceed, as it looked incredibly wet and muddy, we fumbled with a ‘cigarette’ for a moment. Having already decided we would probably enter anyway, regardless of the dampness and muck, we took a quick break and smoked it to put off the inevitable for a moment longer – the unavoidable fact that we were going to get very dirty. Unfortunately, sparking up down here turned out to be a big mistake, and we soon found out why the cave is known as ‘Smokies Cave’. Lighting up down there creates a very dense cloud of smoke that stubbornly refuses to move, no matter how much wafting you try to do. Consequently, taking clear photographs becomes very difficult. In the end, we finished up with a set of snaps that looked as though they’d been taken down a steamy sewer. On top of the smoke issue we’d created, we quickly discovered that the cave was much wetter and muddier than we’d first anticipated. Furthermore, the ceiling height becomes very low at this point and it becomes necessary to crawl on all fours – both hands and knees. As we crawled on, passing remnants of condom wrappers and the odd cider can, we became increasingly desperate to find somewhere we could stand up. Fortunately, we reached this point after around ten metres or so, and from this point on we name this section ‘Pussy’s Point’. This is the most spacious part, boasting a head clearance of approximately 12ft, so you can stand up. For a good distance this section, which looks as though it dates back to the early twentieth century, is lined with bricks and it looks a little bit like it was originally a ventilation shaft. A lot of coal fragments are scattered across the floor in here. In many ways, it reminded us of the service tunnels in Standedge canal tunnel, where you disembark from the raft (if you enter via dinghy). Looking ahead, further down into the cave, a very small crevasse-looking type of thing was visible, and it was filled with rubbish and other pieces of shit. It looked very much like a dead end. This seemed like the sort of place people tend to avoid, unless you want to take a piss into it from the entrance point, especially since it was roughly four-foot-tall and four-foot-wide and involved slithering on your chest through the mud, wrappers and other dubious-looking things. For some unknown reason, however, we decided to risk catching gonorrhoea and other highly contagious things, and we went for it. The sludgy shit made strange sounds as we crawled on, but we tried to avoid looking at it. The smell was bad enough after all. We continued like this, winding left and right, for what felt like an eternity, until eventually the height of the ceiling began to increase. Five minutes later, down in the depths of the cave things started to feel much different. It began to feel like some sort of game of survival. Although it was much cleaner down here, the walls of the cave were changing in colours and textures, sort of like an LSD trip (we imagine), and it felt as though we were becoming lost in a different sort of world, far away from the surface. What was certain at this point, however, was the fact that we were definitely in a former mine since the ceiling was flat and there were random man-made mounds of debris here and there, which made crawling very difficult. A number of roughly made brick walls started to appear in this deeper section too, which made the whole things feel increasingly like a forgotten labyrinth. The height and width of the mine changes a lot down here; at some points, while lying flat on the floor, the ceiling is about two inches above you, and at others it is much higher. After two hundred metres or so of crawling along the ground, we reached a ramp that led down into a long straight tunnel. This tunnel, unfortunately, is filled up to the ceiling with water. While we were a little disappointed the explore was ending here, we were able to push aside our disappointment as we became captivated by a series of beautiful coal veins which were dotted everywhere around us. At this point, though, we started to notice that our heads were hurting, presumably due to a lack of oxygen, so we decided to make a hasty exit. As you might expect, it took us a lot less time getting out than it did getting inside! Back in the oxygen filled entrance to ‘Smokies Cave’ (the smoke had finally cleared now), we decided to continue our walk down the culvert. The fantastic stone continued the entire way, right up until the end where we reached a metal grate covering the exit. As you can imagine, this walk was blissful compared to the cave where we’d been forced to crawl. It didn’t take too long to bypass the metal grill, and slightly relieved to be in the fresh tasting air of the woodland we headed up the hill to where we guessed civilisation might be. A few free roaming horses passed us as we scrambled through thick brambles, which we thought was a little strange. Determined to find civilisation, however, we chose not to stop and mediate on the situation. Further up the hill, we edged past some sort of mini-rave tent gathering too, where the sound of Macky Gee tickled our ears, which, again, seemed rather out of the ordinary given where we were. At this point, we decided we’d had enough of Bishop Auckland’s strange occurrences, though, and keen to re-join a bit of normality we continued on without stopping, hoping to find a road or a building of some description. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Box, Husky and Beth. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29: 30:
  6. History Up on the bleak moorland, just outside the small spa town of Buxton, is Harpur Hill and its large 222 ha Health and Safety Testing Facility. Funded under the Government’s Private Finance Initiative, the £56 million laboratory was constructed back in 2002. Years ago, back in 1938, Harpur Hill was a remote RAF base that housed bunkers and an underground ammunition store; therefore, the land was found to be suitable, and still rural enough, for redevelopment into a testing facility. Presently, part of the site has been used to reconstruct a Jubilee Line, using old London Underground trains. It aims to recreate the 7/7 London Tube bombings so the safety of future carriages might be improved. The facility warns that whenever red flags are flying at designated posts around perimeter, a toxic explosion on the site is imminent. Other experiments at the site have involved crash testing trains, heating up shipping containers packed with fireworks and replicating other notable accidents. According to local rumours, although public footpaths run through the grounds of the facility, the site is closely monitored by sensors, and watched by CCTV cameras, and they observe your every move! A team of camouflaged ‘Area 51’ style guards also hide in the bushes and patrol the perimeter on half-hourly rotations. The locals say so, so it must be true. What is more, aside from normal workers, it is believed that a team of scientists live onsite; apparently, they have been sighted exercising on the grounds, but they are never allowed to leave. Finally, the old tunnels are said to still be in service, but whatever goes on down there remains a tight secret. Our Version of Events Anyone who has read our previous reports will know that for a while we rolled around in a bright orange car – not by choice we hasten to add. For this explore, though, we decided to ditch the old beast, and go for something more covert, given that this site sounded like Fort Knox. Our choice would have been a tank, to bypass the ‘Area 51’ style guards, but nowhere we know had any of those available. Instead, we had to settle for a blue car; we could only hope it would blend in with the surrounding countryside. Doing our best to look like ‘hikers’, with Peter Storm boots, plastic anoraks and a bit of tweed, we abandoned the new motor in a layby and joined the footpath that leads towards the facility. To avoid the ‘commandos’ in the bushes, we pretended to look like lost walkers, gazing hard into the sky as though we were trying to find the North Star; we hear that’s how ‘propa’ hikers navigate. Eventually, after leaving several false trails in our effort to shake the guards, we reached the perimeter fence. However, by now it was lunchtime, and being hikers we’d brought our sandwiches and Ginsters pasties with us, so it was crucial we sat down to eat them. The lukewarm flask of tea went down nicely at this point too, it’s thirsty work trying to be stealthly. After making some final adjustments to our thick woollen walking socks, we decided to orientate the map and check our bearings. A couple of pasty crumbs deceived us at first, as we thought they were buildings, but because one of us has gained our Bronze Duke of Edinburgh Award we were eventually able to spot the mistake. So, guessing we were right on the right course, we set off once again. Judging by the brown wiggly lines on the map, it looked as though the motion sensors were dead ahead. Of course, being prepared for every eventuality, we’d brought air-freshener with us to combat this obstacle. A great plume of Air Wick’s 4 in 1 Lavender scent was released in front of us as we walked; we hear that ‘pro urbexers’ do this to make motion sensor laser beams appear. Don’t worry, for those of you who are wondering, we did a couple of stretches right after we got the air freshener out, to make us supple enough for a game of Twister, and to squeeze between the beams if necessary. Several moments later, despite our tactics, security must have spotted us because a pack of scientifically altered dogs from the laboratory were on our tail. Ignoring the legendary advice that you shouldn’t run on a full stomach, we hit legs. The great steroid injected beasts were right behind us now, foaming at the mouths and growling loudly. Being prepared ‘urbexers’ though, we reached into our High Gear rucksacks and pulled out three fresh steaks – Tesco’s Finest, from some made up farm somewhere. Ford Mayhem lobbed them behind us as hard as he could manage. The trick seemed to work, as the dogs quickly stopped and devoured each other in the frenzy. The four of us, breathless after running, reached the final perimeter; it was a large 32.7 foot palisade fence with razor wire fixed on top. As we grumbled amongst ourselves, that the ‘locals’ had failed to tell us about the fence, we decided to take a break and come up with a plan. Feeling hungry once again, and knowing we had to keep our energy up, we pulled out a gas stove and a couple of Wayfayrer flat-packs (sausage and beans). An awkward silence ensued as we tucked into our meal; knowing that you might lose a testicle climbing a fence puts a bit of a downer on things… … And then we stopped daydreaming about the local rumours. In reality, there were no guards, motion sensors or any air freshener. The modified dogs weren’t real either, they were sheep, and, as far as we could tell, they weren’t modified in any way at all. Other than passing through a couple of muddy fields, reaching the underground trains was actually fairly straightforward and largely uneventful. It did feel a little odd being sat on a London Tube train with Peak District scenery in the background of course. Overall though, it was great to see and experience the site as it was interesting to see London Underground trains ‘out of context’ so to speak, and because some great work is being done here – we only wish we’d been present when they put fireworks inside a shipping container. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do and Husky. *No tweed was worn for the duration of this explore. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29:
  7. Christmas day, get me out of here! So off i went to take the dog for a walk, that was my excuse! Meaning to check this area for a while, i grabbed the dog, wellies, waterproofs, a bit of kit and off i went into the rainy, windy Lincolnshire wolds. The landscape of the Lincolnshire Wolds has been shaped a great deal from industry. The obvious is farming but the not so obvious is ironstone mining. It is hard to believe when looking out over the tranquil landscape of Nettleton and Claxby that it was once a very different scene, a noisy and bleak setting where up to 150 people worked to mine the ironstone of the land. Underground ironstone mining was part of the life of Claxby Parish from 1868 to 1885. This was followed by the first cut of the Nettleton mines in 1928 which remained open up until 1968. Mining provided employment for the people who lived in the area, along with financial support and social opportunities for miners and their families. Many houses you see in the area are linked to the mining industry. All entrances were well filled/sealed, accept one. I was lucky to find entry into one tunnel and walked for about five minutes heading deep down into the hillside, till i came to a solid wall of ready ready-mix concrete. Looks like tons of the stuff had been poured down from above, luckily one man and his big chisel had smashed a tiny hole through. Got through that, the tunnel was looking endless again! Unprepared, torch batteries dimming, no-one knowing where i was and with the rain lashing down outside that may cause flooding and collapse, i made my way back out. Ive never seen photos from within the mine, would i have made it in if i kept going? I dont scare easily, but i wanted out! Not a great vid, but explains a few things in the report, There is a lot more external stuff to see round this area, if this type of stuff interest you its worth popping by, nice for a long walk in the wolds if nothing else
  8. Hi all this is a cool little place. Its the barton undercroft in manchester. I couldent wait to give it an awesome title name cause well its an abaondoned horror walk also now lol. Very cool. Anyway on with some history. History The arcade was listed as a Grade II* listed building on the 25 January 1972. The listing includes the "block of shops (Barton's Building) and offices enclosing the arcades." It was constructed by Corbett, Raby and Sawyer in 1871.[2] Hartwell describes the Barton's Building facade as "utterly ignorant.. the ground floor pilasters must be seen to be believed."[3] The arcade, however, is "a gorgeous glass and iron shopping arcade with glass domes..., the best example of this type of cast-iron and glass arcade anywhere in the country."[3] The entrance to the arcade on St Ann's Square incorporates a large, cast iron and glass wall. The two entrances on Deansgate are hidden behind the Barton Building. The building is of "four storeys with an attic, a long nine-bay facade to Deansgate, divided in half horizontally by a balustraded balcony".[2] The structure is composed of cast iron and glass. The iron work was supplied by the Macfarlane Saracen Glass Factory in Glasgow.[3] The building was one of the first to be built on the newly widened Deansgate.[4] The arcade was restored in the 1980s. The original shop fronts and decorative floor no longer exist Thats from wiki but some other bits i found It was used as some sort of ghost tour by a company called flecky bennet. And they talk about anne frank etc. It was used has a bunker in the blitz etc. When they was told they couldent do it anymore seems they left a lot of stuff. very intresting if a little fooked up and creepy has shit when you turn a corner and 6 mannequins stare back. Anyway was bloody great fun And visited with @stranton and a big thanks to @bolts also. Things went fairly well until we opened a door and out came the alarms and secca. Talk about move fast lol. we got out ok but fook wish i could have mooched a bit more. Got a couple of pics from roof also. Overall just a fun night. Just dont mension the fact we went into a carpark found an open door went for a we mooch has you do only to find a fooking bank vault and cctv every where jeesus we ran like the wind lol. Shame sadly no pics for obvious reasons ie bloody cam right at us. Outside on the side of the building in big fooking letters it says BANK lol. Yes folks a maybe live bank by accident lol. Awesome. Never stuck around to find out. And good job cause a guy was seeling us in and he said his stuff about police and we where robbers etc etc lol. And off we went. Anyways some pics for you. Enjoy all thanks for reading. Pics.. Give me an hand lol... Lovely old stairs Roof shots Thanks to everyone who looked i hope you all like it. On to the next laters all.
  9. I have wanted to see this place for over 2 years, so was great to see it at last. I like photographing Victorian brickwork, which upstood years of use and then years of neglect, and is still in good condition. Many thanks to Hughie for this one. Very little history on the place but this is the underground Victorian reservoir of the Grantham Water Company which was formed in 1855 Explored with the most excellent company of Mikeymutt, Rubex & JanovitchGagovan. thanks for looking
  10. Managed to bag some tickets for London's disused station, Aldwych. Not been south for a while, so got a nice early train down and had a good walk round for the day. Construction started on 21 October 1905 with demolition of the Royal Strand Theatre which occupied the site, it opened as Strand station on 30 November 1907. Both entrances had Piccadilly tube on their facades when the station opened. Not long afterwards, these were changed to Piccadilly RLY as the UERL disliked the word tube. The station was renamed Aldwych on 9 May 1915. The Aldwych service was suspended on 22 September 1940 and used as a shelter for the public during air raids. It opened again on 1st July 1946. The platforms and tunnels at Aldwych station are 92 feet and 6 inches below street level. From June 1958 the line began only in rush hours. It was eventually closed in 1994 when the original 1907 lifts needed urgent replacement and the cost could not be justified. Aldwych station and the trains have been used for many films, TV productions, music videos ( some listed below) and emergency services training. (Film) Superman 4 Atonement V for Vendetta The edge of love 28 weeks later The deep blue sea The Krays (Tv) Sherlock Mr selffridge (music) The Prodigys, firestarter A modified and expanded version of the station appears as a level in the video game Tomb Raider III. The station was the subject of an episode of most haunted in 2002. Im not a fan of of the show, but it starts with history into the station, which is pretty good. On with the pictures, Thanks for looking my friends
  11. Visited with Conrad + a non member. Well it's the morning after an alcohol-fueled Saturday night...We've just had about 6 hours sleep after hitting Bristol's shittest club, where Conrad lost his marbles and kept buying us jugs of green cocktail and we all ended up super pickled! After leaving the guesthouse, settling my malfunctioning gizzard (god bless Morrisons' toilets - curse Fosters, VK and weird cocktails) and getting a fry up, we finally get to the derp albeit feeling a bit fragile... History wise the quarry dates back to the early 1800s and was the last of it's kind to use ponies. You can still see their tracks in places. It's a remarkable site in that it's very much public and well trodden, yet very well preserved, with little to no vandalism. How all places should be really, in a perfect world. We'd heard different things from different people regarding size, stability, etc. It does have a dodgy feel to it - melon sized slithers of rock hang from the ceiling by a thread in places and you can see where there's been significant falls in the past. The place is actually really quite big, I think we spent over 4 hours inside before Conrad had to catch his train back t'up North. In photos, the place looks much the same, so I don't have many of them. Another entrance. Being us, we took a much more complex route in through a small vertical slit! With splore buddy Mr.Pb. Conrad was fiddling with his tripod out of view. Beauty of an old crane, still standing. Video footage (shows way more than my pictures do): Decent bit of underground exploring on the whole! Was nice to get out of the wind and crap West Country weather! Excellent hangover cure too! Thanks for looking!
  12. UK Longbridge Bunker

    Certain parts of longbridge that were left look amazing from previous reports, before my time unfortunaltely but i was still determined to check out every nook and cranny around the area just in case we had missed something! Ive been up the area a handful of times over the last year and despite the ever evolving building site and quite a few failed attempts eventually Lucan and I were able to have a look at the last few bits. Not much information about this place, This used to be part of the body shop areas for a Factory. The shelter is unique about 400ft long, it was constructed out of brick and reinforced concrete; using a cut and cover method with a possibility of mining. It has possibly been used for storage since the war. Sadly the Body shop itself has been demolish over a decade ago… this is all that left. I thought the way it was built is really curious, looking at aerial photos from the time the rest of the shadow factory was constructed it appears to have been built after westworks factory was already there. Hopefully ill turn up some more info. thanks for looking
  13. UK Air Raid shelter

    Lovely trip to see this place; I think its been a while since it was photographed. Sometimes you often find yourselves questioning why we do the things we do… today was no exception. Migraines, hidden holes, rubble every where and bad air! not to mention the occasional squeeze Still had to be done and feel very fortunate to have seen this place, Despite the state of me and the location! Bit O history.. There was a prevailing mood in the Government against deep shelters being built for the protection of large numbers of civilians. Their effectiveness from high explosive bombs was questioned, based on reports of their performance in the Spanish Civil War, and there were also concerns about costs. The Government’s preference for almost two decades had been for smaller, dispersed shelters, and so the large deep shelters that went ahead all had very specific causes, such as their being in areas with previously excavated mines and tunnels, or eminently suitable geological conditions, or even very determined local authorities who were willing to risk losing government grants to build the shelters they wanted. However when the Blitz started in the autumn of 1940 policy changed and permission was granted for the two large civilian shelters Grant funding was generous given the need to protect the skilled workers. The shelter was in the side of the hill allowing access at grade into two main entrances, while at the uphill end a 25m ventilation shaft was sunk, doubling up as an emergency escape via a series of steep metal ladders. The tunnels in between these ends were cut out in a familiar gridiron layout, with four long perpendicular tunnels fed at both ends from the two main entrances, and eleven cross tunnels. Toilets, a canteen, and a first aid post were provided either in the cross tunnels or at tunnel intersection nodes. Within this 1596 bunks and 793 seats were provided for those lucky enough to have the requisite shelter permit. Construction began in December 1941 and was largely completed within a year, having suffered from escalating costs, geological problems, an unskilled labour force, and also paradoxically trespassers and vandalism. The original intention was that the tunnels would be 2.1m wide and 2.0m high with an arched roof, but the surviving tunnels are considerably larger than this. Records indicate that the considerable height came about following roof trimming required in the latter stages of the project due to the softness of the rock and problems with instability after exposure to the air. The shelter, like many of the deep shelters reluctantly approved by the Government, came too late to provide mass protection during the periods of heaviest bombing. After the war it was used for customs and excise storage, fire brigade training, and was even considered for Cold War use but rejected due to extensive dry rot. The Local Borough Council visited in the 1950’s to see if they could find a use for it, but disapprovingly recorded it to be “damp, dark and featureless” and it has been sealed in recent times. Local groups in the last decade have looked at ways of reopening it as a tourist attraction, and hopefully one day will be successful. Thanks for looking More pics http://www.the-elusive.uk/
  14. Hi all, I'm new to Oblivion State, but I've been doing Urban Exploring for about 18 months now. Here is my latest explore from late last night. Coulsdon Deep Shelter This was the site of my first proper Urban Explore about 18 months ago. I remember scrabbling through the woods one October night with some friends (that I think were quite convinced I was trying to get them killed) trailing behind me to try and find the way in. Eventually of course we made it in and it was all worth it. I of course had no idea what I was really doing, I don't think any of use really do when we start this rather weird hobby. Neither the less, 18 months later and I'm still hooked (and somewhat poorer with all the camera equipment I've bought). I heard that this the shelter had been sealed up with a massive pile of dirt back in the middle of last year. However a few months later there was a report up in October saying it was back open again. So I made a mental note to go re-visit when I got a chance. History The History has been said many time about this locations, so I won't go into great detail. You can get a very detailed write up anyway if you look this shelter on Google, so I'm not going to try and compete with that. It was constructed in 1941 It was bough by Cox, Hargreaves and Thomson Ltd, a manufacturing company that made Optical Equipment. They operated from the 1950s to the 1960s. However the moisture and cold made the tunnel unusable for manufacturing high precision equipment. It was bought by a motor vehicle repair company but they moved out for the same reasons sometime later. It was sealed up and left for years before being opened up at sometime later. The Visit I tried to find 'the usual' way in, but as reported a massive (Its truly massive, it would take a digger hours to clear it all away) mound of dirt and bricks was piled on top of it. Anyway, we dug about with sticks a bit to try and work out how someone got in previously, but gave up after a short while. We started to head back in defeat before accidentally stumbling across a totally new way in. Compared to 18 months ago, not much has really changed in the shelter. The only new thing is the bright pink speakers and DJ mixer that have been left in there from rave some people must have had in there. There was actually cable going into the entrance from outside, so I am assuming they ran a small generator outside and ran the power inside for the speakers. Pretty clever IMO. Full album here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/grahamr123/albums/72157661916861733
  15. Explored with @-Raz- & @Fatpanda after a series of car problems. History; Sandsend Tunnel is a tunnel on the former Whitby, Redcar and Middlesbrough Union Railway that was opened in 1883 and closed in 1958. The rail line that ran through it was originally intended to travel along the top of the cliffs, however some of the cliff fell into the sea whilst construction was suspended so the NER constructed two tunnels, the Sandsend tunnel and the Kettleness tunnel. The Sandsend Tunnel is the longer of two tunnels being 1,652 yards in length. It is predominantly straight but the north-western 300 yards incorporate a curve to the north. There are a total of five air shafts, two of which have nearby service galleries leading off horizontally to the cliffs which were used to dump spoil while carving out the tunnels, the air shafts were capped in 1958. The southern half of the tunnel is considerably damp with the tunnel being flooded to about 6 inches on the southern 300 yards. The southern portal of the Sandsend tunnel is bricked up and it can only be accessed via the northern portal of the Kettleness tunnel by walking through the Kettleness tunnel and the area between the tunnels which is overgrown with grass and trees. The northern portal of the Sandsend tunnel partially collapsed in 2008 after years of pressure from the cliff above. "It is not recommended to access the tunnels due to their poor condition; they have not been maintained since they were abandoned in 1958." - Both tunnels were in pretty good condition other than the odd bow in the wall from the pressure of the cliff above, which just goes to show how strong old school engineering really is Walking the lines; Parking in the hamlet of Kettleness we walked over the cliff tops to where we assumed the portal for the first tunnel was, crossing the farmers field wondering how secure it would be. On arrival however, it transpired that the NY council are a lot more laid back about railway tunnels then WY as instead of the normal palisade fortress, we found just a brick wall with a door sized hole in it. The tunnels itself was rather interesting as far as railway tunnels go, each featuring a mine adit filled with horrible orange, knee deep disgusting muddy water. Did i mention it wasnt very nice? Myself and @Fatpanda had left @-Raz- further up the tunnel so we went for a mooch down one of these. I would say it was about 100m from tunnel entrance to adit entrance, but 20 mins and up to the very limits of our wellies, i misplaced my foot whilst feeling for the next board and went in up to my lower thigh, which of course meant my welly filled to the brim. YUM! Rest of the photos; Tunnels; Mine Adits; Thanks for looking
  16. History Malabar Battery, also known as Boora Point Battery, was constructed at Malabar Head in 1943, during WWII. The battery comprised part of the coastal defence positioned at Bare Island Fort, Henry Battery and Banks Battery; it was built as an aggregate to reinforce the existing structures in place. Early in 1942, after the fall of Singapore, the Australian government feared a Japanese invasion and since the country lacked defences they sought help from the United States. In reality, Japan never planned an invasion as it was deemed unfeasible to try and carry out a takeover; their only significant action against Australia involved advancing through the South Pacific, in an attempt to isolate Australia by slowing the advance of allied forces. At Malabar Battery, two six inch Mark XII gun emplacements were installed. In addition to the guns, an underground counter bombardment facility was constructed, adding to the overall firepower of the defensive structure. This was fitted with ‘gun crew ready rooms’, an ammunition supply/store area and an engine room. A single track tramway was also fitted, traversing from the ammunition drop off point to the ammunition supplies in the basement, and finally to the two gun emplacements themselves. Further sections to the battery included northern and southern searchlight blockhouses, and a barracks and toilet block for the facility. After the war, like most of the other lookouts and defences across Australia, Malabar Battery was decommissioned and the guns were removed. Since then the site has remained abandoned and an alluring target for Australia’s graffiti ‘artists’. Our Version of Events Next on our list of sites to see: the legendary Malabar Battery. Originally, we had intended to meet up with another explorer who’s located in Sydney and he had wanted to take us out to this location, but, due to unfortunate timings, he was busy. Nevertheless, we took it upon ourselves to get on a train, then a bus, and then a second one, all the way down to Malabar. By all accounts, the area looks particularly picturesque when looking at photographs of the coastline, but heed our warning – looks can be deceiving! Only when we were happily on our way, on the first bus, did we noticed that a couple of our fellow travellers were wearing ankle tags. As various normal-looking people got off, more and more dodgy looking characters got on. The bus suddenly began to feel like a prison transfer, rather than a public service. At the point where we had to change buses, we noticed a group of security guards gathered at the bus stop; their job it seemed was to hop on the buses as they drove into Maroubra and Malabar. Once again we found ourselves in ghetto territory. In the beginning, judging by the names, we were expecting to find small Spanish-looking towns: how wrong our first impressions were. We hopped off the bus in the middle of a housing estate somewhere, after I saw a bay out of the window that looked strangely familiar. Indeed, we’d managed to drive to the opposite side of the bay so had to walk back towards our desired location. This didn’t matter so much as we were able to enjoy some of Malabar’s fantastic coastline. It took less time than we’d imagined to cross the bay, and before we knew it we were standing outside the nearby water treatment plant. Since it’s inconveniently in the way, blocking access to the wilderness behind it – where the batteries are located – we were forced to traverse the cliffside. We made slow progress up the rocks, but eventually we caught sight of the buildings we’d been looking for. Careful to avoid snake and other beasties, we wandered into narrow sandy tracks within the bushes. They continued on for quite some time and, since the bushes were high, we weren’t able to see where we were going. Continuing on, using pure instinct (luck), we eventually stumbled upon the crumbling remains of the former battery. The intense glow of the graffiti must have guided us there. With daylight fading quickly we decided to cover the site as quickly as possible, hence why I didn’t manage to get any photographs of the spotlight nests. It didn’t really matter though since there was plenty more to see. At first it seemed that all of the entrances had been sealed, as we’d been warned by others, but after some searching in the bushes we soon discovered what we were looking for: a great big dirty way inside. And that was that really, once inside it felt a little bit like the film, Outpost, with its long concrete tunnels and various chambers. Fortunately, there didn’t appear to be any murderous Nazi ghouls or experiments inside this bunker, so we made it back out again just as the sun had fully set. Only at that point, though, did we realise that we had to wander back through the bush to get out again… Explored with Ford Mayhem. 1: Some Australian Wilderness 2: One of the Spotlight Nests in the Distance 3: Inside the Bunker attached to the Observation Post 4: Former Trenched Walkway and Barracks 5: Former Tramway 6: Main Observation Post 7: Inside the Underground Bunker 8: Stairs (up) to one of the Gun Emplacements 9: Doorway to a Former Ammunition Store 10: Ammunition Storeroom 11: Heading Towards the Second Tunnel 12: Fallen Ventilation Shaft 13: More Underground Tunnel 14: Underground Rooms in the Bunker 15: Old Ventilation Duct 16: Large Underground Corridor 17: Following the Former Tramlines 18: End of the Line (Flooded Second Ammo Store Downstairs) 19: Gun Emplacement Outside 20: Huntsman Spider Merry Christmas Everyone!
  17. just a quick one, not going to write an esssay on this one as it's been done a hundered times and i really need to go do some christmas shopping! visited with 3 non memmbers before heading to certain social event around the corner. was a banging day, wanted to see box for ages and from what i gather took in the majority of the cool bits and bobs down there, the robots, some cranes, the door and of course cathedral. Was nice going down with someone experiences as he knew a lot about the workings of the mine and would point out cool things that might have gone unnoticed, crane anchor points and erosion in certain places caused by the ropes hauling the stone around corners. History courtesy of http://www.subterraneanhistory.co.uk/ This mine has been worked over centuries (probably back to Roman times) and extends many miles. It is located in the village of Box, near Bath. It was used to extract limestone which was used to build many of the buildings in the local area and had military uses during WW2. Box is now a designated Site of Special Scientific Interest, on account of the number of bat species which reside in the mine. There are many famous sites to see within Box Mine including the Cathedral (an open shaft to the surface) and the robots (a large number of bricks which people have taken to making into robots and other things). have a great christmas kids
  18. Underground Belgrade, Oct 2015

    Hi! There're some underground Serbian places for you. 1. Non-touristic part of Belgrade fortress. 2. The old tunnel used as a gunpowder storage. 2. The shelter where in WWII a jewish family hid. Way to the house above. 3. Small military tunnel. 4. Bunker with two fire points. 5. Unique underground complex Tashmajdan. It consists of a bunker, natural caves and a Roman quarry. In these caves people hid during all wars. During WWII German occupants built a bunker where more than 1 thousand soldiers could live for 6 months without going out. In 1954 it was closed and forgotten, and the complex was reinvented in 2007. Caves. So that's all for today, thanx for watching!
  19. Belgium Blue Lagoon (visit 2015)

    A fairly large mine in belgium with some blue water in it , I did a lot of walking and exploring and i actually don't have much pics from here .. But a revisit will surely be planned as this is really cool to explore , been doing more and more underground explores lately and I like it But I'm very inexperienced in underground explores so sometimes I think i'm going to get lost and stuff ... This was also the case in this one, at first I was big mouthing my friends this isn't big , but several hours later hahahaah Blue Lagoon by Vancolen Kevin, on Flickr Blue Lagoon by Vancolen Kevin, on Flickr Blue Lagoon by Vancolen Kevin, on Flickr Blue Lagoon by Vancolen Kevin, on Flickr Blue Lagoon by Vancolen Kevin, on Flickr Blue Lagoon by Vancolen Kevin, on Flickr Blue Lagoon by Vancolen Kevin, on Flickr
  20. My first report here on OS This former mine in Belgium I visit in the spring of this year. we found there some beautiful water ponds. by Isabelle Van Assche, on Flickr byIsabelle Van Assche, on Flickr by Isabelle Van Assche, on Flickr
  21. Infiltration, Underground London.

    A few visits to various sections over the past few years and thought I may as well do something with the clips taken. It might not link as showing error in linking and to try latter
  22. Heard about this place a little while ago after watching it on the news while visiting my mum in Bedfordshire. I spoke to her about it and she was telling me about when it was stopped being used and providing the residents of Bedford with water and has been like this ever since. I found this online, gotta be useful to you guys who like your underground stuff. Dont think it will be too long before this training centre takes hold though from how it reads. Looks to open in January 2017. http://m.bedfordtoday.co.uk/news/community-news/elite-police-training-centre-to-be-built-in-old-underground-bedford-reservoir-1-6953308
  23. History Mining for chert in Bakewell has taken place since 1772, when a potter named Josiah Wedgwood recognised that the fine-grained flinty silica in that area was of an extraordinarily high quality. The chert here was often described as being of a ‘throstle-breast appearance [which] is characteristic of the best quality; this being a silicious rock, with more or less closely-placed brown spots’. In the past the actual material itself was worked into tools originally, and in later years, as the human race advanced to some extent, it was used as a whitening agent in earthenware manufacture. Holme Bank Mine, initially Bakewell Chert mine, which yielded around half of the mined chert from Derbyshire, was the second of two chert mines in the county; the other being the Pretoria Mine. Both were located in Bakewell. It is reported that the chert bed lies on a 1 in 3.7 gradient, therefore parts of the mines are, as you might expect, fairly steep in places. George Tissington of Rowland discovered this for himself on 22nd November 1838 when he stumbled into the ‘Chert Delph, near Holme Hall’ and died as he was returning home in an intoxicated state after shopping in Bakewell. Quite expectedly, because of the gradient, the mine was also subject to flooding during severe winters. Regardless, by the mid-1800s the original quarry, which was created before any underground excavation occurred, became a prominent commercial mining area. For instance, in 1859 over 540 tons of chert was obtained and by 1860 1,080 tons was extracted. A royalty of four shillings a ton was paid for the material. Mining in a quarry, though, was not without its dangers: ‘A serious accident happened on Friday to two men named George Alsopp and William Wildgoose, at a chert quarry, at Bakewell. The men were, it appears, ramming in a charge of powder for a blast, when by some means ignition and consequent instant explosion took place, injuring both very severely; Alsopp was much injured on one side and one arm, but more seriously on the face, and so much so that his eyesight was at first despared [sic] of. Wildgoose was also much hurt about the face, and one hand so much mutilated, that it was feared amputation must be resorted to. Mr. Winson, of Bakewell, who rents the quarry of Mr. Gisborne, humanely conveyed the latter named person by the first available train to our infirmary’. Mining underground began in the very late 1800s/early 1900s, when it was leased to Joseph Smith, and before long the workings consisted of an extensive system of passages with eight different entrances. Original access for the mine was via adits in a quarry at Bank Top and from there the mine stretched out through the hillside and down beneath the road. By 1907 the production at Holme Bank Mine totalled over 2,700 tons of chert. In a detailed report on the progress of the mine, a mining engineer named Arthur G. Taylor of Bakewell described the following: ‘The working face is now about 250 yards in from the entrance to the mine and is upwards of 145 yards in length being across the western half of the area leased. It is advancing steadily towards the northern limit of the area leased. At the extreme west end of the face the workings have reached the limit and at the East end of the workings they are about 50 yards from the limit. There is an area further to the east of this face 142 yards x 70 yards in extent which as I know is still untouched – it lies to the dip of the strata and no doubt fully one third of this area will be found to be below water… The chert bed maintains on the whole its good quality varying from 4’ 6†to 4’ 10†in thickness – that is to say – its useful thickness – though there is probably a foot more of good cherty rock’. The mine continued to prosper through the early 1900s and a high rate of production was still maintained through the First World War. By 1925, 41 men were employed to work underground. Even the disruption to coal supplies during the Great Strike did not see production falter at Holme Bank. Instead, a new diesel engine was installed so that electric lights could be used for lighting. While green tallow candles were first used, by 1931 a Holam compressor/generator lit the entire underground network. Mining continued at a remarkable rate, but, as with all mines, many of the dangers of mining could not be removed entirely. Several more accidents were reported around this time; though safety measures had improved considerably in contrast to the mining conducted during the late 1800s/early 1900s. By the 1940s, during the Second World War, the number of men employed in the mine had fallen to fewer than 20, and only half of those worked underground. At some stage in this period the mine broke out onto the surface though, and from there it was found that the chert was able to be quarried once again. This process was not only cheaper, but also more straightforward. After the war, however, other mines had managed to developed cheaper and more efficient mining techniques and Holme Bank was unable to compete. The mine finally closed in 1959, although it was still used as a block-making plant, using some of the existing supplies of chert, for a number of years after closure. Our Version of Events Typically, as it always does when we plan to go underground, it was a nice sunny day as we set off into the Peak District. And, once we’d arrived, it was even more pleasant. However, choosing to ignore all that we set off in the direction of an abandoned mine and, in our bid to cause some chaos in the country, we made sure to park in ‘residential only’ parking, because Raz said it was OK. As we’d guessed, it wasn’t and ACID received a firm telling off for his crime. At first, access seemed near impossible for those of us who are burdened with huge muscular physiques; those without managed it easy enough. Thankfully, we found a way past this mere hindrance and it wasn’t long before we were deep inside Bakewell’s underworld. The explore itself is incredibly interesting, but a little precarious in certain areas where support beams, walls and ceilings have collapsed; Raz even managed to push his finger through one of the large wooden beams still in situ. So, the thrill that there was a risk of being crushed to death was certainly present while we were down there. All in all the place is a good wander, and you can easily spend hours down there trying to navigate your way through all of the old passages and chambers. Unfortunately, for us though, above ground there was a thunderstorm underway, and a heavy downpour ensued shortly afterwards. Consequently, the old passages we were wandering through all of a sudden became incredibly damp and misty, and thereafter it was impossible to take photographs since the lenses kept fogging up. A little disappointed, we retreated back via some unknown route towards what we thought was an exit. Luckily for us it was, and we were able to clamber back out where we were welcomed into bright sunshine and blue skies. Explored with ACID-REFLUX, Raz and Hydro3xploric. (Good to meet you both! Hopefully we’ll get some more exploring done sometime soon). 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23:
  24. So as you all now know, Network Rail were kind enough to give us a tour of the lower levels of the Train Station as we had failed numerous times to reach these areas via stealth. Explored with Raz & Jord Bit of History; Leeds railway station (also known as Leeds City railway station) is the mainline railway station serving the city centre of Leeds in West Yorkshire, England. It is the second busiest railway station in England outside of London. It is located on New Station Street to the south of City Square, at the bottom of Park Row, behind the landmark Queens Hotel; it is one of 19 stations managed by Network Rail. God knows what that is in the corner of this photo... Leeds is an important hub on the British rail network. The station is the terminus of the Leeds branch of the East Coast Main Line which provides high speed inter-city services to London and is an important stop on the CrossCountry network between Scotland, the Midlands and South West England connecting to major cities such as Birmingham, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Derby, Nottingham, Reading, Bristol, Exeter, Plymouth and Penzance. There are also regular inter-city services to major destinations throughout Northern England including Manchester, Liverpool, Newcastle and Sheffield. It is also the terminus for trains running on the scenic Settle to Carlisle line. Leeds is a major hub for local and regional destinations across Yorkshire such as to York, Scarborough, Hull, Doncaster and Sheffield. The station lies at the heart of the Metro commuter network for West Yorkshire providing services to Bradford, Wakefield, Dewsbury, Huddersfield and Halifax. With nearly 28 million passenger entries and exits between April 2013 and March 2014, Leeds is the busiest railway station in the North of England and the second-busiest railway station in the United Kingdom outside London, after Birmingham New Street. The Tour; Jordan had arranged the trip underneath the station with a contact of his in the weeks beforehand, and they had agreed to show us the old offices and workings under the station, and we hoped that the rumours of the old ststion beneath the current one were true. Here are a few pics of where we were taken. We went through restricted areas such as the building works for the new south side entrace, through the British Transport Police car park, and of course through the warren of tunnels and corridoors which make up the bowels of this impressive termini. At one point our guide led us through a series of doors and down a shady elevator into the car park of the Queens Hotel... a very familar smell of the Dark Arches reached out nostrils and we soon found ourselves under the arches which we had already explored many times; http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/showthread.php/9335-Dark-Arches-Revisit-July-15-(More-Photos) At this point we were all looking at each other with a slight smirk and sort of acting all like "Yeah this is cool, never seen this before... oh wow i bet its impossible to get down here" - AWKWARD!!!! And on the way out we nipped through the British Transport Police offices and as it turnes out they have a very pleasing staircase! Throughout this entire trip even though i knew i had permission to be there, i was shatting myself everytime a member of Network Rail staff came across us after a couple of years of avoiding security forces and workers!! Old habits die hard! So i leave you with this question, there is a massive amount of evidence to suggest the existance of a railway station beneath the current known working station, and we were given full access to the lower levels but we were not shown this... Is there more? Thanks for looking
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