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Found 10 results

  1. I wont bore you with too much history, this place has been done before, and has been done better than my attempt. I just want to share some of my stuff, and hopefully get to know some people on the forum as I am pretty new to urbex. HISTORY: St Joseph's College, Upholland is a former Roman Catholic seminary in Upholland, Lancashire, England. The foundation of the large building was laid in April 1880 and college was opened in 1883. The buildings have recently been deconsecrated. In 1986 the total number of students was down to 82, of whom only 54 were Church students, and it was no longer viable to educate them on the premises. From 1987 the remaining students attended St John Rigby College in nearby Orrell for their schooling, an arrangement that continued until the very last of these students left Upholland in 1992. My Version = I was planning on visiting Crank Caverns with a few friends to start our exploring adventures with an easy location, but on route, I found the College. We parked quite a bit away from the main road into the spot, so I dont even know what that side looks like, but I will be returning. We approached through the woods, down a public footpath and arrived at the amazing building. We spent around 15 minutes taking a few snaps, looking at possible entrance points, but by the time we made it around to the cemetary, a friendly security guard came around and informed us that we were trespassing and had to leave. We had a bit of a chat with the friendly bloke before heading off on our way with a bit more information. My friends and I also run a facebook page where we post all of our outdoorsy stuff, bikes, urbex, 4x4ing, anything really. https://www.facebook.com/0151outdoors/ Anyway, heres some pictures, if anyone here can shed some light on approaching this place with more chance of success, give me a message please.
  2. The Explore Explored this place many times and always seems to have something new for me each time. The winter has not been kind to the place this year so thought I would pop another little report on to show what the old girl is looking like at the moment. The History Briefly, the abandoned St Joseph’s College, Upholland is a former Roman Catholic seminary, situated at Walthew Park, Upholland, Lancashire, England. The foundation of the large building were laid in April 1880 and college was opened in 1883. The buildings have recently been deconsecrated following the announced closure of the College which saw the last students leave in 1992. The seminary was founded in 1880 by Bishop Bernard O’Reilly to be the Seminary serving the North West of England. The college was formally opened in 1883 and was situated in Walthew Park, Upholland, the geographic centre of the Diocese of Liverpool. In 1986 the total number of students was down to 82, of whom only 54 were Church students, and it was no longer viable to educate them on the premises. From 1987 the remaining students attended St. John Rigby College in nearby Orrell for their schooling, an arrangement that continued until the very last of these students left Upholland in 1992.
  3. The Visits I'm sure this forum is awash with St. Joes reports but I thought as I'm new it would be rude of me not to post a few shots from my explores of this wonderful building. They are from a number of different visits ranging from June to October this year. Most have been very early morning visits hence the sunrise shots, personally I think this is the nicest time to enjoy this building. There are a good few generic shots everyone has seen before but I just love the place so couldn't help myself The History St Joseph’s Seminary at Upholland opened in 1883, the first phase was built to a design by James O’Bryne. Set amongst a backdrop of copse and wildwood amidst gently sloping fields, the buildings are flanked with rough-hewn stone. An upper and lower lake are separated by a gentle and soothing waterfall. The 150 acres of land the seminary is built upon had been purchased at auction in 1877. The grandeur of the chapels, meeting rooms, fixtures and fittings was unbelievable. The seminary was closed during WW1 and reopened in 1919 along with a junior seminary. The second phase of construction commenced in 1923. The design was in a different style to the original buildings, however it was equally as grand. Landscaped gardens and sports facilities were also completed by 1927. A new chapel was added in 1930 along with 14 sub chapels. The final addition to the site was a science block.
  4. Visited with a few peeps from here one early Sunday morning. We got to the site at about 5am and then met headed up to the roof to cook some breakfast, was so nice sitting there watching as the light started to come over the view. We spent about 3 hours there and only covered about 10% of the place, a revisit will be needed. Also the sausage butty wasn't that bad either. History St Joseph’s Seminary at Upholland opened in 1883, the first phase was built to a design by James O’Bryne. Set amongst a backdrop of copse and wildwood amidst gently sloping fields, the buildings are flanked with rough-hewn stone. An upper and lower lake are separated by a gentle and soothing waterfall. The 150 acres of land the seminary is built upon had been purchased at auction in 1877. The grandeur of the chapels, meeting rooms, fixtures and fittings was unbelievable. The seminary was closed during WW1 and reopened in 1919 along with a junior seminary. The second phase of construction commenced in 1923. The design was in a different style to the original buildings, however it was equally as grand. Landscaped gardens and sports facilities were also completed by 1927. A new chapel was added in 1930 along with 14 sub chapels. The final addition to the site was a science block.
  5. History: Briefly, the abandoned St Joseph’s College, Upholland is a former Roman Catholic seminary, situated at Walthew Park, Upholland, Lancashire, England. The foundation of the large building were laid in April 1880 and college was opened in 1883. The buildings have recently been deconsecrated following the announced closure of the College which saw the last students leave in 1992. The seminary was founded in 1880 by Bishop Bernard O’Reilly to be the Seminary serving the North West of England. The college was formally opened in 1883 and was situated in Walthew Park, Upholland, the geographic centre of the Diocese of Liverpool. In 1986 the total number of students was down to 82, of whom only 54 were Church students, and it was no longer viable to educate them on the premises. From 1987 the remaining students attended St. John Rigby College in nearby Orrell for their schooling, an arrangement that continued until the very last of these students left Upholland in 1992. Explore: I visited here with loocyloo (shout to her for letting me crash at hers and being the designated driver), redhunter, whynotdiex, and a couple of non-members. we arrived here pretty early and under dakrness made our entry. Now, we had a little bit of time to kill, so what better way that to do it with a fry up on the roof? Nothing kicks off a day of exploring better than a bacon buttie! Soon enough the sun was up and we were off to take some pictures! Bumped into about 8 other explorers here - unfortunately I'm not sure if any are members:confused: We had a real laugh, and no doubt this was topped off with a brilliant security encounter. We were on the roof shooting and heard a car arrive, and in record time a head popped up from the access hatch - "youre not supposed to be here" he muttered, and after a brief moment we said we'd leave. We packed up out gear and descended the ladder only to find he'd wondered off, so we took that as an opportunity to spend another hour inside shooting! Definitely one of my top explores, in a beautiful location with some top company! I was told the sinks were sealed, but coming all this way I had to go and check for myself. An awkward climb through a smashed window led into the courtyard, and I thought I'd go check it out before dragging all my gear out there. Realising they were sealed i now had the job of getting back through this smashed window, and with glass left in the frame it made it awkward. I opted for a heard-first approach and hoped for the best. Lucky, loocyloo was on hand to document the whole situation on my camera. It's safe to say she got a bit snap happy, as 2 minutes later I had over 40 pictures of me attempting to get through a window! To finish off, a group shot in the courtyard! As always, thanks for reading!
  6. Hello again! Possibly the most documented urbex building in the UK so theres no need for history, just check out the hundreds of other reports. I've legit done this place to death, seen every part other than a few rooms which are always locked. St Josephs hosted a recent meet up myself and -Raz- attended and that was a quality day with Mars Lander, Hank Moody and others. A personal Favourite photo, can anyone spot Raz? Photos from various explores; If you got this far, thanks for reading
  7. BEEP BEEP tour bus coming through! Yeah its been a touristy weekend, never bumped into another explorer until this weekend and bumped into other explorers at two separate locations in one day! To be honest though i couldnt give a sheet, i've wanted to see Joe's for a long time and it was bloody ace so dont care if every man and his dogs, grannies, aunties, budgeys, brothers, mothers, lovers has been through here, i had a good time, took some alreet photos and got wood for some wood, good day in my books!- and yeah i know pretty much every photo in my set will have been taken by someone else before but hopefully a few of them are at an angle half a degree or two different from the rest! Im surprised there aren't little foot prints painted on the floor and signs saying, stand here, point camera there! anymahoo, good evenin explorers, how are we all? hope everyones been getting some good exploring in over the weekend, must say ive had a great weekend up north, St Joeys (seminary, not the orphanage), walkleys clog museum and blue church. Joes was amazing, a wood lovers wet dream, walkleys was just bloody fun, hardly a shining beacon of beauty and decay dancing around each other and conjuring up emotionally evocative scenes of lost moments frozen in time - nah bollocks to that shit, walkleys is just good ol fashioned, peter pan, never gona grow up, big kid fun, didn't think much of blue church to be fair, bit too far gone now if you ask me. Ageing/decaying has given way too plain old trashed now unfortunately. Ill fire up reports for walkleys and joes but hardly think the church is worth it, only took about 4 shots in there. moving swiftly onwards - the explore Oh my Cheesus christ, that noise... those of you who have been will know what im on about, that noise is HORRIFIC, i swear i could here it when i got back to worcs later that night, anyone thinking of going-ear plugs, big massive ear plugs. Im surprised the local explorer who showed us around has got any ears left! first stop was the chapel, awesome timber frame roof in this place with absolutely beautiful hammer trusses, luckily someone previous to us had covered one of the main PIRs so we didn't have to suffer through that bloody noise again, though unfortunately we would be hearing it again shortly! we spent a bit of time in chapel though i wasn't happy with most the photos i took, bar the one beneath that is, just about the only alright shot i got in there to be fair. after that we had a wander around the ground floor whilst it was still early, took in some nice big rooms, bit of ceiling porn and a bit of corridor porn, whilst downstairs we headed over to the world famous sinks, like i said earlier, we've all seen them before but here they are again after the sinks we headed upwards and to be honest cant really remember what order the explore went in after that! at one point we were on the roof, at one point i saw a dead squirrel, at one point i lost everyone, at one point people were getting spun around washing machines...which was later described as epic... never have i heard the words epic and washing machine in the same sentence, it didn't look very epic, the parma ham i was tucking into whilst this was going on however... To be fair this is a big place you could wonder around here for days! Ill give you some token gesture copy n paste history and then let the pics speak for themselves in terms of the explore - a pictures worth a thousands words n all that! oh yeah, decay wise joes has got a nice mix, fairly fresh looking unscathed parts right through to the odd buggered floor, some mouldy walls, fungus looking stuff in places, mossy floors in places, plants growing places they shouldn't be, all nice lovely stuff :thumb Bit of History History St Joseph's College, Upholland is a Former Roman Catholic seminary, situated at Walthew Park, Upholland, Lancashire, England. The foundation of the large building was laid in April 1880 and college was opened in 1883. The buildings have recently been deconsecrated. St Joseph's College was founded in 1880 by Bishop Bernard O'Reilly to be the Seminary serving the North West of England. The college was formally opened in 1883 and was situated in Walthew Park, Upholland, the geographic centre of the Diocese of Liverpool. The first Junior Seminary of the Diocese was founded at St Edward's College in 1842 as a Catholic 'classical and commercial school' under the direction of the secular clergy and was established in Domingo House, a mansion in Everton. Its President for the next forty years was to be Monsignor Provost John Henry Fisher. When the Junior Seminarians moved to St Joseph's the school was taken over by the Christian Brothers (who also ran St John Rigby College in nearby Orrell) and continues to this day and now serves as the Liverpool Cathedral Choir School. In recognition of the heritage owed to St Edward's College one of the two chapels at Upholland was consecrated as the St Edward the Confessor Chapel. Along with the other main seminary in the north of England, Ushaw candidates for the priesthood studied and were ordained at the college. Up until the second Vatican Council boys as young as 11 years of age entered the Junior Seminary before progressing to the senior Seminary at 18. In 1972 following the changes of Vatican 2 the two junior seminaries of St Joseph's and Ushaw merged at Upholland, and in 1975, with declining numbers of men from Ireland offering themselves for the (now) Archdiocese of Liverpool the Senior seminary moved to Ushaw. St Joseph's continued to offer boarding school education for boys considering a vocation until 1987. Following the end of the seminary training and boarding education St Joseph's became home to the Northern Institute and was used as a retreat and conference centre for the Archdiocese under the leadership of Msgr John Devine. The election of Archbishop Patrick Kelly saw the controversial decision to close St Joseph's altogether and the property was sold to Anglo International who instructed AEW Architects for the conversion of the Grade 2 listed RC Seminary to 92 apartments, with 220 new build enabling units. The major controversies of the decision were the ongoing financial viability of St Joseph's (it had just started to make a small surplus under Devine's management) and the sale and disposal of the art and artefacts in the college, much of which had been donated by various parishes and people of the Archdiocese who were not offered their donations back. And here is some picturephotos you know em-you love em!! ladies and gentlemens its joes sinks, lets have a round of applause for joes sinks!!-its just a row of sinks... thanks to facebook i think i've seen more of these sinks than i have my own bloody sink! i dunno, its an alright shot but not enough wood about for my liking! need to learn how to deal with blown out windows- any tips welcome! tried to recreate my sandwell college pic - not even close! Thanks for looking guys, hope you enjoyed yet ANOTHER set from St Joes, it really is an awesome place.
  8. St. Joseph's Seminary The Explore An unexpected trip but a very welcome one after a very kind last minute invite from Urblex, thanks mate I happened to be in the Shropshire area as it turned out the day before the explore so was already two hours from home but more importantly, less than one hour from Wigan. I was faced with the choice of driving all the way home and returning in the middle of the night 40 squid of diesel lighter, or arriving 12 hours too early and spending the night in the car. Last June when access was a little more tricky here myself, Matt Inked and Catbalou attempted an insane access point here in the middle of an fucking monsoon for well over 18 hours and eventually had to return home defeated. In recent months the place has been appearing more and more online, all good for us at the time, but everyone knows that too easy an access normally only ends badly for the location, which is the most important thing in my opinion. Secca needs to get out of that cabin from time to time and keep the more unsavoury characters out before its DRI'd. Anyway, i digress. I met up with Urblex, Ferox, a nice lady and gentleman called Kirsty and Paul from 28DL and I must've looked a state after a hypothermic half-sleep in my car nearby. Good to meet you all, cracking company! Approximately 25 mins after the access we had our first taste of the ear shredder, fuck me, one to be experienced to be believed. A few minutes after eardrum hell started we decided we might as well push through the known alarmed areas while they were already belting out their decibels, turned a corner into the main corridor at lo and behold, standing at the end of the corridor was a tall bloke dressed in black gesturing us in his direction. Fuck sake, all that effort and busted within half an hour? I walked towards him with a couple of random people that appeared from nowhere just before the alarms started wailing. I could see his mouth moving but couldn't hear a thing, i just assumed he was giving us a bollocking and nodded accordingly. I noticed a Go-Pro attached to his chest but thought nothing of it at the time, in this day and age. He led us out of the of the noise and only then did I hear what he was saying then noticed the tripod on his back. Turns out he was a local explorer and knew the place like the back of his hand. What a mug I felt and he laughed when I told him that i thought he was escorting us off site haha. He said he's a member of OS but didn't mention his user name. If you're reading this mate, big thanks for the info and directions After a quick chin wag i realised i had lost the rest of the group in the commotion so spent the next hour mooching around on my todd whilst looking to re-group. We found each other and spent a good 4 hours exploring this mint place with lots of comedy moments, especially when we walked around blind corners to occasionally set off the alarms and heard other groups do the same a few floors below us. Lots of mini heart attacks each time lol, a fun morning out indeed! The History St Joseph's College was founded in 1880 by Father Dougal Maguire to be the Seminary serving the North West of England. The college was formally opened in 1883 and was situated in Walthew Park, Upholland, the geographic centre of the Diocese of Liverpool. St. Joseph's (usually referred to by its students simply as "Upholland") was one of two main seminaries serving the north of England. Upholland served the northwest, Ushaw College the northeast. For many years, each of these institutions housed both a junior and a senior seminary. The election of Archbishop Ted Crilly from Craggy Island saw the controversial decision to close St Joseph's altogether and the property was sold to Anglo International who instructed AEW Architects for the conversion of the Grade 2 listed RC Seminary to 92 apartments, with 220 new build enabling units. The pictures 1. External taken Jun 14 2. Roof Pano 3. 4. Loved the roof detail in this place.. 5. 6. 7. Ferox at work... 8. Turrrquoise Hall 9. 10. It appears that at one point the security office was in the main building... 11. Up the wobbly ladder to the clock tower with Urblex... 12. The White Arches.. 13. 14. 15. Spider Apartments.. 16. 17. 18. Spiraly-ness... 19. 20. Lower floors area... 21. Some kind of drying room.. 22. Dinner Time.. 23. The old classic from here.. As always, thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated folks
  9. Sell Out Cat Crew meet: Been wanting to see this for a awhile and finally got a chance. Knowing it was a pain in the arse to navigate if you didn't know where your were going didn't put me at ease, and of course there's the ear bleeding alarm. Visited with Banned Batz, scrappy and his lass. I took too many photo's here so here's a selection more available on flickr or blog. *insert ear bleeding alarm noise for full effect*
  10. Hello again! Absolutely loved this place, visited in February with Goldie and then returned in March. Once with AndyK!, Kriegaffenine and Zero and then with DirtyJigsaw and Miz Firestorm. On the first visit: Overall a good, easy explore.. After exploring the place for about 3 hours we decided to begin our exit, On the way down the stairs we had encountered the PIR sensor that we had walked past several times that day with no alarm at all, just a red light. "No problem." i thought, i just took a quick step across the hall way to start heading to exit, then Goldie walks over and its just the same, i noticed the door at the end of the hallway was open, however it wasn't the past three times we walked past! I say to Goldie: "Somethings not right, we gotta get out now i think." Goldie simply replies: "Yeah." We began walking and then we hear this absolutely horrible sound.. Hmm, how do i put this into text? "WRAAAAAAAAAAA..." The alarm.. My God, noise has never scared me like this, a f*cking massive shock it was. So we legged it and i mean legged it through the corridors to our exit. Upon leaving i remember running back through the trees and looking back on the place wailing away, I looked at Goldie and said "Fuck yes.." Gotta say, a high five never felt so appropriate. The next couple of visits were fairly easy however, a good time on every visit! Was good to join you all! Some History: St Joseph's College was founded in 1880 by Bishop Bernard O'Reilly to be the Seminary serving the North West of England. The college was formally opened in 1883. St. Joseph’s (usually referred to by its students simply as "Upholland") was one of two main seminaries serving the north of England. Upholland served the northwest, Ushaw College the northeast. For many years, each of these institutions housed both a junior (minor) and a senior (major) seminary. The junior seminaries provided a secondary education in a semi-monastic environment to boys aged 11–18 who wished to pursue the priesthood, while the senior seminaries trained adult candidates (mostly aged between 18 and 24) in philosophy and theology as they prepared for the priesthood. Although Upholland flourished until the 1960s, the rapidly changing social climate in that decade led to a sharp drop in enrolment. In the early 1970s, the northern bishops decided to consolidate the activities of Upholland and Ushaw; from 1972 all junior seminarians in the north attended Upholland, and from 1975 all senior seminarians attended Ushaw.[3] Even as the sole junior seminary for the north of England, however, Upholland continued to suffer a decline in enrolment, and by the 1980s was no longer a traditional seminary but a "boarding school for boys considering a vocation". In 1986 the total number of students was down to 82, of whom only 54 were Church students, and it was no longer viable to educate them on the premises. From 1987 the remaining students attended St. John Rigby College in nearby Orrell for their schooling, an arrangement that continued until the very last of these students left in 1992. Photos: Thanks for looking!
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