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Found 11 results

  1. History The Waterloo Tunnel is a 779 metre (852 yards) long disused railway tunnel in Liverpool. It opened in 1849. At its Eastern end, the Waterloo Tunnel opens into a short cutting (approximately 63 metres long) which connects to the Victoria Tunnel which is 1.536 miles (2.474 kilometres) long. Effectively, both tunnels are one long tunnel with an open-air ventilation cutting in between; however, they were given different names initially because trains in the Waterloo Tunnel were locomotive hauled while trains in the Victoria Tunnel were cable hauled. In terms of tunnel architecture, the Waterloo Tunnel features a semi-circular opening, wide enough to accommodate three separate tracks. The westernmost section has been backfilled and there are occasional accumulations of calcite on the brickwork. Most of the Waterloo Tunnel is brick-lined; however, it is not listed. The Victoria Tunnel, on the other hand, is Grade II listed. It features a rusticated arch flanked by buttresses, together with a modillioned cornice and ashlar-coped parapet. The first two-hundred yards of the tunnel are brick-arched, but after that it is unlined up to the fourth ventilation shaft. There are five visible air shafts in the Victoria Tunnel, and an additional five hidden shafts. A drain also runs down the length of the tunnel, but this has collapsed in certain places. Both tunnels were constructed because the city of Liverpool is built on a densely populated escarpment (a long, steep slope) that drops down to the River Mersey. This meant building on the surface would have been difficult without causing major disruption, but also that the landscape was ideal for the construction of a line that could be placed beneath the ground. Nevertheless, cutting both tunnels still proved to be a difficult task as care had to be taken to avoid disturbing the buildings above due to their shallow depth. The work from Byrom Street eastwards proved the most difficult and perilous and, despite efforts to excavate carefully, the soft clay in the area caused several houses to give way, rendering them uninhabitable. All the inhabitants were forced to abandon their homes at short notice. What this means is that the design of the tunnel – becoming two separate structures – was a result of circumstance. The first goods traffic travelled through the tunnels in August 1849. However, a three-foot section of Victoria Tunnel collapsed in September 1852. The collapse was quickly repaired and the tunnels were used by goods traffic without any further major incidents until 1899, when a freight train consisting of a tank, twenty-three loaded wagons and a brake van separated when a coupling between the seventh and eighth wagons fractured. Two wagons and the van were destroyed in the incident, and two of the three men aboard were killed. A train that was travelling towards the docks was also caught up in the accident as it collided with the debris and partially derailed. Although both the Waterloo and Victoria Tunnel were initially part of a freight line, they were opened to passenger traffic in 1895. Passenger services continued to run up until February 1971. Many of the large docks in Liverpool ‘dried up’ as they were affected by declining industry across the UK and this resulted in a significant decrease in traffic on the line. Both tunnels were officially closed on 19th November 1972; although, a small section of the Edge Hill line was retained as a headshunt. It is rumoured that this track is still used very occasionally today. Whether this is true or not, though, is another matter. The futures of both the Waterloo and Victoria Tunnel are uncertain. However, the Merseyrail Network have proposed to use part of them to create a connection to the low-level Liverpool Central Station. Creating the connection would reduce journey times to Edge Hill. Unfortunately, though, so far all plans have fallen through due to some local opposition and budget constraints. The last attempt to revive the line was made in 2007, driven by plans to redevelop the north shore area of Liverpool. Our Version of Events After meeting up with a couple of Liverpool based explorers, and hitting an old industrial site first, we decided to head over to the Waterloo/Victoria Tunnel. It was good to meet a couple of locals for a change because they both had an exceptional knowledge of the area – something we lack when it comes to exploring in Liverpool, unfortunately. Anyway, this saved us having to do much research and scouting for a change. So, thanks fellas! When we initially rocked up outside our chosen access point, several Network Rail guys were busy standing around a couple of shovels and one guy down a hole. Rather than leave and come back, though, we decided to sit in the car and wait for them to fuck off. Our patience paid off pretty quickly since the boys in orange decided to down tools literally five minutes after we’d parked up. Once they’d left, we gave them an additional five minutes before we grabbed our gear and made our way into the tunnels, to account for any of them who might have left their beloved tape measure or spirit level behind. The first tunnel, the Waterloo Tunnel, smelt strongly of tar or creosote. We weren’t sure of the source, but the floor was fairly manky, giving an indication that there may have been a recent spillage. That, however, was perhaps the most interesting part of this section of the explore. All in all, it didn’t seem especially exceptional – even if it was quite wide. Hoping the explore would be better in the latter half, then, we cracked on and made our way towards the open-air section. As several other reports have revealed, the open-air section/accident between the two tunnels is full of shit. It seems Liverpool folk don’t bother visiting the local tip, they simply lob their old goodies off the bridge on Fontenoy Street. Anyone seeking spare lawnmower parts, or a second-hand seatee, should get themselves straight down to the Waterloo Tunnel. Sadly, we didn’t need either, so we had to clamber over the mountain of shit instead, to reach the Victoria Tunnel on the other side. Once inside the Victoria Tunnel, we began our long walk towards Edge Hill Station. At this point, we weren’t aware how long the bloody thing is, but it soon became clear to us that the light at the end of the tunnel wasn’t getting much closer any time soon. Nevertheless, we plodded on, heading towards the small dot of light in the far distance. The Victoria Tunnel was much more interesting that its sister. A large proportion of it is brick-lined, but there are also large unlined sections that have simply been carved out. There are several ventilation shafts to look at along the way too, and each one is different to the last. It’s only now, having been inside the Victoria Tunnel, that we understand what a few of the random structures are on the surface directly above. Finally, the tunnel ends with a short section of railway track that is still in situ, which is always nice to find. The only things to be careful of down this end are Network Rail workers and, so we have been told, a camera waiting for unsuspecting visitors to the tunnel. Explored with Veryhighguy and The J Man. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29: 30:
  2. The Victoria Arches were a series of arches built in the embankment of the River Irwell in Manchester. They served as business premises, landing stages for Steam packet riverboats, and also as World War II air-raid shelters. They were accessed from wooden staircases which descended from Victoria Street. Regular flooding of the river resulted in the closure of the steam-packet services in the early 20th century, and the arches were used for general storage. In World War II the arches were converted for use as air raid shelters. The arches are now bricked up and inaccessible; the staircases were removed in the latter part of the 20th century. In 1838 the city authorities completed construction of a new embankment along the River Irwell, to support a new road. The arches were built at the same time, and created new industrial space. In 1852 the life-boat Challenger was built and launched from the Arches. In the Victorian era passenger trips along the river Irwell were very popular although it was becoming increasingly polluted. In 1860 the Irwell was described as "almost proverbial for the foulness of its waters; receiving the refuse of cotton factories, coal mines, print works, bleach works, dye works, chemical works, paper works, almost every kind of industry." The Rivers Pollution Prevention Act 1876 was designed to solve this problem, but it was largely ineffective. It did however lay the groundwork for the more draconian legislation which followed Following the opening of the Manchester Ship Canal in 1894, in 1895 at least one landing stage was opened by the Manchester Ship Canal Company, who actively encouraged passenger traffic. The company purchased several steamers, two of which, the Shandon and the Eagle, are known to have used the landing stages. The boats could carry 900 and 1,100 passengers respectively. During the first half of 1897 more than 200,000 passengers were carried on trips around Manchester Docks, with holiday seasons the most popular periods. Competition for passengers was fierce, and there were at least two landing stages, operated by different companies. The ferries would occasionally carry musicians, for passenger entertainment. The stages suffered problems with flooding of the Irwell, and do not appear to have remained in business for long; they were closed in 1906. In Underground Manchester; secrets of the city revealed, author Keith Warrender quotes from the recollections of a Manchester City News writer published in 1923 about the arches (he calls them "Victoria Arches"), sixty years previously; I became acquainted with those arches in the sixties, for my father, a master joiner and builder, had a workshop there. Two approaches thereto were provided, one by a flight of steps near the Cateaton Street side of the old churchyard, and the other at the corner of Victoria Street and Fennel Street. The arches were lofty and spacious, and had previously been used as a copper and iron works, in connection with which was a tall chimney by the cathedral steps. Part of the chimney was damaged by lightning and the upper part was taken down in 1872. I believe the lower part remained until the old buildings at that point were demolished, not many years ago.[9] He continues, quoting another letter from the Manchester Evening News in 1960 which says; At the time I knew it well, 1898, one or two of the arches were used as a battery station by Manchester Electricity Department and two or three others as meter testing and storage departments. Also there was the first testing station for the department where the prototypes of all apparatus used by electricity users in the city were tested. The tunnel was bricked up, about level with the end of Fennel Street. From its gradient it would reach approximately water level at the Irk at the bottom of Hunt's Bank, and the other end would reach street level at St Mary's Gate. The roadway was one cart track wide. The entrance was in Victoria Street alongside the door to a tobacconist's shop near Cathedral Yard During World War II the stages and tunnels surrounding them were converted into air-raid shelters.The conversion, which included additional brick blast walls, took three months at a cost of £10,150 and provided shelter for 1,619 people. The cobbled surfaces shown in some of the pictures on the Manchester City Council website show the same network of tunnels before their conversion to air raid shelters. The land covered by the arches included a street, which led at the west end to a wooden bridge over the River Irk. The old road was covered over in an improvement scheme, which began in 1833. The steps and landing stages have remained closed to the public for many years. In 1935 less elaborate steps were in place, some of which remained until 1971.[14] In photographs taken in 1972, the arches are barred, and some are covered with metal grilles.[15] As of 2009, none of the steps remain, and the original Victorian railings along the embankment have been replaced with a stone wall and new railings. Some old pictures first as the arches used to be .
  3. Victoria Infirmary - Glasgow

    The Victoria Infirmary in Glasgow is due to shut this year due to the opening of the new Southern General Hospital. I was wondering if anyone knew how it takes them to fully secca these places up, and if I'd have a chance to get a wee mooch around?
  4. The Victoria Tower was designed by Jesse Hartley and completed in 1848. It was known as the Dockers' Clock. Its six clock faces allowed sailors to make sure their timepieces were correctly set as they headed off to sea, and a bell in the tower warned of fog or high tides. It is constructed of granite and is a Grade II Listed building. thanks..
  5. So after doing some research about the area i came across this pdf http://www.london.gov.uk/sites/default/files/Royal%20Docks%20Heritage%20Report%20Part%20II.pdf normally i wouldn't bother linking these sort of things, but page 11 onwards and page 45 include some photos of millennium mills i'd never seen before, complete photos of when it was still in operation. As well as other listed buildings in the local area, nice little gander. edit: also a rather nice image : http://www.docklandsmemories.org.uk/Dysonpix/West-Silvertown-1958---Graving-Dock.jpg
  6. Visited with Skeleton Key, UrbanX, Trog and Mrs Trog, Urban Ginger and IanB Since it construction, the hospital has been known by a few different names......Folkestone Dispensary from 1846 to 1863, then between 1863 and 1890 it was called The Folkestone Dispensary and Infirmary, follwed by The Victoria Hospital between 1890 and 1910 and lastly The Royal Victoria Hospital from 1910 onwards. The Hospital in 1898 In 1973 the maternity unit was transferred to Willesborough Hospital and following the opening of the William Harvey Hospital at Ashford in 1979, the Royal Victoria was transformed into a centre for geriatric, stroke rehabilitation, eye surgery and general practitioner patients. On the 14th September 1944, the Hospital was hit by a German shell. Two members of staff and a passing member of the home guard were killed. In 2005 it was decided that 2 wards were to close at the hospital,and in 2006 it was announced that the old victorian building at Royal Victoria was to be put up for sale by it’s owners, the East Kent Hospitals NHS Trust. Within a week an action group was setup, Save OUR Royal Victoria. The East Kent Hospitals NHS Trust confirmed in 2007 that the building would be sold, but did pledge to re-locate some of the services into adjacent hospital buildings which were remaining open. In 2008 the East Kent Hospitals NHS Trust committed to retaining all services at the current hospital site with a £3.6 million investment in upgrading and modernising the remaining buildings. There was also a deal struck to retain the main building facade of the origenal victorian building when the land is developed. As the trust wants to sell the site with planning permission for houses, it first commissioned an ecology survey - during which the pipistrelle and rare serotine bats were discovered in the back of the main building and in the separate Wakefield Hall. This has set back the trust's plans by around nine months, while further information about the protected species is collected and alternative roosts are provided. Director of facilities Howard Jones said: "We had not noticed any bats before the survey so it was a surprise. It is a bit of a nuisance, but planning is a tricky thing these days, the trust is to apply for a licence to remove the bat roosts and to make sure they are caused minimum disturbance." BATS 1 - Developers 0
  7. right after being awake for 36 hours having a run in with everyones favorite friends and plan b leaving the four of us caked head to toe in mud soaking wet and ready to call it a night we then get a text from ojay an hour later we find are selves in Victoria arches Manchester ... visited with ojay, obscurity,maniac, wevsky stayed in the car with a four pack kicking himself a big for ojay being tour guide .. a little history .... The Victoria Arches were a series of arches built in the embankment of the River Irwell in Manchester. They served as business premises, landing stages for Steam packet riverboats, and also as World War II air-raid shelters. They were accessed from wooden staircases which descended from Victoria Street. Regular flooding of the river resulted in the closure of the steam-packet services in the early 20th century, and the arches were used for general storage. In World War II the arches were converted for use as air raid shelters.The staircases were removed in the latter part of the 20th century. on with the pics ... Thanks for looking
  8. Big thanks to the guys who found this, and Obscurity and Wevsky for some help. We origenally intended to do this last week, but alas it wasn't to be. One week later, and with a bit of lateral thinking we were inside. This hospital has been known by several different names in its time, Folkestone Dispensary (1846-1863) Folkestone Dispensary and Infirmary (1863-1890) Victoria Hospital (1890-1910) Royal Victoria Hospital (1910-present) In the post war era it was operated as an NHS hospital offering most of the common NHS services at the time. In 1973 the maternity unit was transferred to Willesborough Hospital and following the opening of the William Harvey Hospital at Ashford in 1979, this hospital was transformed into a centre for geriatric, stroke rehabilitation, eye surgery and general practitioner patients. In June 2005 it was announced that 2 wards were to close at the hospital, The Fitton and Edinburgh wards. They duely closed later that year. In December 2006 it was announced that the old victorian building at Royal Victoria was to be put up for sale by it's owners, the East Kent Hospitals NHS Trust. Within a week an action group was setup, Save OUR Royal Victoria, with aims to draw attention to the hospital and the potential re-location of key services to other hospitals. In June 2007 the East Kent Hospitals NHS Trust confirmed the building would be sold, but did pledge to re-locate some of the services into adjacent hospital buildings which were remaining open. In September 2008 the East Kent Hospitals NHS Trust committed to retaining all services at the current hospital site with a £3.6 million investment in upgrading and modernising the remaining buildings. There was also a deal struck to retain the main building facade of the origenal victorian building when the land is developed. There appears to be some development happening on site as we recced the place the week before, unfortunitely not gaining access that time so we returned this week with a plan and also found some scaffolding has sprung up at the front. There's also some inside the building on the top floor. There is a published history of the hospital: Martin Easdown, A Grand Old Lady: The History of the Royal Victoria Hospital Folkestone, 1846-1996 (1996) Visited with Frosty. Firstly, an old photo of the outside - this one was taken in 1910. Secondly an apology that most of my photos are portrait, it seemed to suit the building better, but it has made this post seem quite long! Good to see the NHS taking such good care of medical records Thanks for looking! Maniac.
  9. Royal Victoria Hospital Folkestone, Originally opened in 1846 as Folkestone Dispensary, Visited with Space invader, Wevsky, Ian B, Obscurity and his mate, I wont go on with the history as Wevsky and the other guys have more than Covered it very nicely And so on with the pics How it was "Back in the day" Hospital Radio I could Picture Smashy & Nicey in here ! X - Ray And Finally The Morgue Sorry If its a bit "pic Heavy" But I took hundreds in here and this isnt even the tip of the ice-Berg
  10. After visiting mid week for the first time.And realizing there was just to much to take in in the little daylight we had left So we decided last minute a revisit had to be done,so after an early morning start with wevsky and obscurity we headed back to folkestone . This is the first time ive explored an hospital in such good condition was and defintley worth the revisit .... visited with wevsky obscurity,silver rainbow ,peach ,troglodyte and ian b wont bore u with the history again so on with the pics THANKS FOR LOOKING
  11. Royal Victoria Hospital? Previous name(s) Folkestone Dispensary (1846-1863), Folkestone Dispensary and Infirmary (1863-1890), Victoria Hospital (1890-1910) Foundation Year 1846...Closed November 2009(ish) In 1973 the maternity unit was transferred to Willesborough Hospital. Following the opening of the William Harvey Hospital at Ashford, this hospital was transformed into a centre for geriatric, stroke rehabilitation, eye surgery (1980-1994) and general practitioner patients. There is a published history of the hospital: Martin Easdown, A Grand Old Lady: The History of the Royal Victoria Hospital Folkestone, 1846-1996 (1996) And as far as I can tell the last two remaining inpatient wards at the Royal Victoria Hospital closed in 2004/5 as for date the rest the amenities where transferred to the walk in centre next door I think that was some point 2006 and when this hospital finally closed its doors in 2009 November we think due to calender left open and various letters..its been left to sit ever since! For a run down on what?s proposed for the site if you really want to know then have a look http://www.gofolkestone.org.uk/newsletters/september2007/rvhospital.html Combination of two visits so ..visited with obscurity SpaceInvader , Silver rainbow,Troglodyte and Peach...Big shout out to Ianb for visiting with us on this one.. A nice old pic from way back when On with a few of the several hunderd pics ive taken..really dont wanna do a multiple thread thing with a huge amount of pics and tbh its been hard trying to pic out some of the best features..but here goes Im sure obscurity @ space invader etc will put up a different selection as i say hundreds of shots to choose from and forgot to upload a few of the radio station but hey ho .. Thanks for looking
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