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Found 359 results

  1. The chapel, with ten-part rose windows, was intended simply as a funerary chapel, not a place of worship, and intended to be non-denominational. The floor plan is in the shape of a cross and the main entrance was covered for access by horse-drawn funeral carriages. Winding wooden staircases in the twin turrets gave access to the public gallery above. The octagonal steeple stands at 120 feet (36,5 meters) and was the tallest in the district when it was built in 1840. The architect was William Hosking, better known as a civil engineer; this (and the main cemetery entrance) remain the only surviving examples of his architectural work. The chapel is also the oldest surviving non-denominational funerary chapel in Europe. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  2. I didn't know if the property was still accessible. For this reason, I checked it the night before. The next day I visited the historic mansion in the early morning. I was very tired, but I was rewarded with some nice wall and ceiling paintings. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
  3. I found the ruins of that chapel, located at the edge of fields, while searching on Google Earth. Because unable time and to far away from the day-route, it wasn't possible to plan it into the daily program of the tour. So I've decided to visit it at night and to take the pics with long exposure or with lighting by torch. From the outside, the chapel was very unimpressive. Nothing really special, but inside a dome and pillars arches could be seen. 1 2 3 4 5 6
  4. A large complex with several buildings. Partly the middle of demolition, so that workers prevented the exploration of the remaining area. 1 2 3 4 5
  5. An abandoned house near a park. Unfortunately, I know nothing about its history. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
  6. An old abandoned coalmine in Germany. The baskets are really special and it was nice too see, 'cause my grandpa used to work in a coalmine in the Netherlands. But probably back then it looked different. Tnx for watching #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10
  7. This huge site was a newspaper printers that I saw online had recently closed, so I decided to go for a drive to see what was left. Turns out it was still a live site (the offices) and they was getting the machines ready for sale or to be scrapped. I managed to talk my way into been given permission to take some shots of the place before it was emptied. I spent about 2 hours inside wandering about, which for me was awesome considering I dont get to do much in the way of industrial sites. There was quite a lot still to see and some big machines, some of what wasn't very old at all. A lot of jobs were lost which is always a shame, production got moved to another site in the end. More photos from here on my Flickr
  8. A well-known orphanage in Italy. The access was easy. Although in the center of town, but no one is interested in it. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
  9. History Thurleigh was built for RAF Bomber Command in 1941 by W & C French Ltd in 1941. On 7th September 1942 the 306th Group started to arrive; with some of their B17s flying in the following week. From October 1942, the 306th Group mounted a long and arduous offensive suffering many losses. The Group finally completed their long war on 19th April 1945 which was their 342nd mission; the second highest for any B17 Group. During its time at Thurleigh over 9,600 sorties had been flown with the loss of 171 aircraft in action and over 22,500 tons of bombs were dropped. In 1946 construction work began on the airfield to turn the site into what became known as the Royal Aeronautical Establishment, Bedford. The airfield was finally closed in 1997. (History borrowed from Nelly) The Explore Explored with Session9 and Hamtagger, this was the second site of the day. A long walk into the middle of nowhere - A load of sheep, a farmer cutting grass or crops and a large car graveyard was ahead of us before approaching the control tower area. I recently acquired a pair of mint condition WW2 binoculars and was dying to use them. This was their first explore, and funny enough they came in very handy for checking out the tower for entry points from miles away as well as potential onlookers, security patrols, etc. Upon arrival, it was sealed pretty tight and entry seemed unlikely at first. After a bit of rummaging around amongst a load of unrelated rubbish outside, we used something makeshift along with a leap of faith to shoehorn ourselves inside. Looks like this place has been kept relatively free from youth vandalism, many windows and doors were still intact and the place lacked usual tagging normally found more inner city. Most of the rooms have weathered well over the past 18 years, with algae and moss growing on various parts of the walls. The contrast of green growth, yellow backdrop and a browning rusty texture make well for a point and shoot let alone a crisp DSLR set. Top floor contained all the telecommunications equipment along with remnants of signal flares. 2nd floor from top contained the wall board with all the flight information and included various documents and information, other floors contained geological information and weather reports. Overall, a great and interesting explore. It is very rare to see somewhere that has deteriorated largely through weather and time rather than some little shit throwing bricks through the windows and wrecking the place. Pictures Thanks for viewing The Lone Shadow
  10. A few months earlier I was standing in front of this building, they actually closed it completely down, wow. As I was looking for an entry, I heard voices inside - jump scare - , I shouldn't go exploring so often on my own.. , Oh right..remembered the concierge put on the radio and light just to keep people away from it.. Now last month one of the few fellow explorers in this area posted pictures from a revisited, the castle was for sale and open for visitors twice a week, yes! I dragged my mom along with me because this was my only chance to ever get her in an abandoned building, legally. She thought it was awesome, even tho' she was scared of the ceiling crumbling down and the floors that could be rotten Anyhow; here are the pictures from our little trip!
  11. The large hotel with several accommodation wings and surrounded by an old park was built in the nineteen-twenties. The spa centre in the hotel used water which was particularly rich in mineral salts. The Hotel was closed about 2007. It took a while until we found an open access. After about four hours, workers (or whoever, two men in white coats) came into the building and we had to get out quickly, but we have not been seen. But, unfortunately, therefore we could not explore everything inside. Part one 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
  12. A friend sent me the coordinates of the castle via SMS at the last day of our Italy tour this summer. And since it was on our way, we drove there. A restorer was present, who opened us and gave us permission to visit it. (Visited with Miaro Digital.) The castle was first mentioned in the late 14th century. It was in possession of various noble families and was rebuilt in the late 17th century. Recently the property was used as an orphanage. Mostly empty but with beautiful ceilings. Now, the castle is to be renovated in the coming years. Part one 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
  13. A former children's home with a chapel. Unfortunately, I know nothing about its history. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
  14. A short stop; visited with Miaro Digital on our this year's Italy-tour. Built between the 17th and 18th centuries, the small Italian church was seat of a parish in the mid-19th century. Since 1960 it has been hardly used. In the early 1980s, a wedding was performed here the last time, in 1990 the church was already documented as "neglected". 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
  15. Visited with The_Raw, skeleton key, extreme_ironing and MiaroDigital in the last night of our UK-Tour. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
  16. Golden Oldies for the win! Taken in 2011 and reconverted since then, the Monastère de H (aka Monastère de TF). This monastry was build in the 1930s and abandoned by the beginning of the new century. It was build on top of the remains of a 13th century castle but I couldn't detect any remains of that era. 1. 2. 3. 4.
  17. The former village was first mentioned in 1513. After a chapel of 1717, 1736 the foundation stone was laid for the church. The nave was closed late 19th century as places of worship, the renovation started in 1903. Mid-20th century all Germans had left the place. Some buildings were inhabited by Slovaks, vacant houses were demolished gradually. The last inhabitant died 1983. Today from the former village exist only two ruinous houses, the church and the cemetery - several kilometers away from the nearest village and only to reach about bad dirt roads. In 2007, the roof of the church was repaired. Is anyone there, it can be officially visited. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
  18. A great hotel in Germany. I already visited it about 20 times; I saw the change of it. Most rooms are already trashed or demolished, but there are also some nice spots in there Never go in there without a good mask! Too much mould, it isn't healthy at all. The building burned already two times and that's the reason for the decay. The owner has left Germany and nobody knows what will happen to it. It's a question of time. Now have fun with my new pics! Sorry for the bad quality, I don't know how to upload without loosing quality At first #3 pics I already edited
  19. Manicomio di R - visited may 2015 Manicomio di R, one of the most precious and famous asylums in Italy So this one we had to do, and we did... for like 20 minutes :-( We decided to do the underground-route because that was the 'most unseen' one. Once on groundfloor, we were welcomed in the very nice corridors. I wanted those corridors since a long time, so I couldn't wait to do this shot. Unfortunately, 20 minutes later, two men in very cool uniforms stood in the hallway: carabinieri! Not smiling at all, also the farmer (owner/guard/I have no idea) wasn't amused with our visit. they told us some old folks saw us getting in, and called them up. Lucky one: the carabinieri spoke a bit english, we could make ourselfs a bit understandable what we were doing. We had to leave immediately, off course, so we came back in that park-area... 5 or 6 grandpa's and granny's were looking at us coming out the building, thet looked like we were some kind of scum. They even closed the frontgates of the park, to make sure we couldn't escape. We all had to give our ID-cards and domestic details. This time, it was a warning, next time it will be court... so they told us. This is one of the most beautiful decayed asylums I've ever tasted, Oh I will have my vengeance on this one! Here the only shots I could make of this amazing location, at least I have a pic of the cool corridors I wished for, but thats all... be careful what you wish for, God can be a funny guy I guess :-) 1. 2. 3.
  20. Knitwear Factory - may 2015 This knitwear factory is my personal number one during our six day italian tour. Actually, it even was one of the big reasons making the choice to explore this country this time. And believe me, my friends... I am really not that big of a religious person, but boy I have prayed all the gods and saints, getting the chance to shoot this location. And it was like expected, hoped and wished one of the most beautiful factories in general I have ever explored. To be honest, i did experienced this as a difficult one to shoot... I noticed there was a lot of choas in backgrounds and sometimes it was hard to make a decent point of view and compositions, especially to get some overview images. The first 15 minutes I was inthere, I was too euforic and amazed anyway. I even didn't rush to take my camera out, just enjoying the view, smelling the atmosphere, fantasising of how it once was when it was still running. Enjoying its natural beauty through my eyes without a lens. Absolutely fabulous: it still looked like nothing had been moved or manipulated since its closing, no trash, no vandalism, no graffiti,... only natural decay. Even the machines still looked ready for use, a perfect scenery. For me, this one was 100% hardcore urbexporn. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.
  21. Visited with Maniac, The_Raw and MiaroDigital. The tower was originally a Martello tower which was part of the UK Napoleonic defenses, there were over 100 of these towers built along the south coast in the 1800's. It was converted into a water tower in 1902 (in fact there are two of them on the site, both identical) and the one we climbed around also had a lookout post attached to it which why it had those extra rooms on the side. (Thanks to Maniac for this information) Later, the area was used for training of young navy recruits. Unfortunately we didn't get much further than the tower and couldn't explore the other buildings, because shortly afterwards we were escorted "friendly" from the ground... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  22. Already very broken and also difficult to photograph around the graffitis (partly I've retouched them). 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
  23. Bawdsey was an RAF station situated on the eastern coast in Suffolk, England. Also known as Bawdsey Research Station (BRS), the first Chain Home radar station was built there, characterized by eight tall masts, four for transmitting and four for receiving. When the research group moved to Dundee in September 1939, the radar station was left active under the name RAF Bawdsey. The site later hosted a Bristol Bloodhound surface-to-air missile station until 1990. (acquired by sentinel) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
  24. Unfortunately completely gutted and therefore of photographic point of view a bit monotonous. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  25. The bunker is located in the dunes of ÃŽle de Noirmoutier , an island in france.
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