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Found 10 results

  1. Tottenham House is the centrepiece of the historic Tottenham estate in Wiltshire, England. The grade I listed house has 103 rooms and mostly dates from the 1820s when it was remodelled by Charles Brudenell-Bruce of Ailesbury. Set in forestry land that originally stretched for over 100 square miles, the extensive estate was partly used as a deer park and the deer still roam the lands to this day. The estate was the home of Jane Seymour, the third wife of King Henry VIII, who died giving birth to the future king Edward VI. Henry VIII, a keen deer-hunter, regularly stayed there as a guest of Sir John Seymour, Jane’s father. The Ailesbury family lived in Tottenham House and shared it with the US Army during the Second World War. They moved out in 1946, at which point Hawtreys Preparatory School used the house until 1994. In 1966 the house was designated as Grade I listed, and the 50-horse stable block and octagonal folly in the deer park were designated Grade II listed. Visited with @SpiderMonkey and @PROJ3CTM4YH3M. All the walls in this room were lined with marble... The circular music room with ornate dome ceiling is stunning And finally a few externals
  2. just a quick one, not going to write an esssay on this one as it's been done a hundered times and i really need to go do some christmas shopping! visited with 3 non memmbers before heading to certain social event around the corner. was a banging day, wanted to see box for ages and from what i gather took in the majority of the cool bits and bobs down there, the robots, some cranes, the door and of course cathedral. Was nice going down with someone experiences as he knew a lot about the workings of the mine and would point out cool things that might have gone unnoticed, crane anchor points and erosion in certain places caused by the ropes hauling the stone around corners. History courtesy of http://www.subterraneanhistory.co.uk/ This mine has been worked over centuries (probably back to Roman times) and extends many miles. It is located in the village of Box, near Bath. It was used to extract limestone which was used to build many of the buildings in the local area and had military uses during WW2. Box is now a designated Site of Special Scientific Interest, on account of the number of bat species which reside in the mine. There are many famous sites to see within Box Mine including the Cathedral (an open shaft to the surface) and the robots (a large number of bricks which people have taken to making into robots and other things). have a great christmas kids
  3. This was my 2nd mine/quarry of the day that i visited, again a lovely place, a bit more touristy but pretty safe and easy access, plenty too see with the old graffiti and horse shoe markings etc, and also a really well preserved crane. another one that i will be going back to visit as a few bits i didnt see inside and to the east and west outside of the mine. little bit of borrowed history: "Kingsdown Quarry also commonly known as Swan Mine is a small bath stone quarry lying under the hillside along the road from Bathford to Kingsdown. The Main entrance to the quarry is opposite the Swan Inn which was once the Quarry managers house, the inn its self is held to the hill side by great iron chains anchored ito the buried workings of the quarry itself. Kingsdown Quarry was producing stone as far back as 1833." enjoy the pics alan.
  4. This was our first port of call for the evening and it didnt disappoint,not only did i manage not to get lost but i didnt get stuck in that awkward crevice which is the known as the letter box(i think). Visited with Obscurity and non member John. History Blatantly stolen Kingsdown Quarry also commonly known as Swan Mine is a small bath stone quarry lying under the hillside along the road from Bathford to Kingsdown. The Main entrance to the quarry is opposite the Swan Inn which was once the Quarry managers house, the inn its self is held to the hill side by great iron chains anchored ito the buried workings of the quarry itself. Kingsdown Quarry was producing stone as far back as 1833. ] Thanks for looking!
  5. What ho chaps,just a quickie to say hi.I was directed here by his Nellyship and was known as oldscrote in another place.
  6. Visted With Phill, Les, Ben, and myself, we arrived a little late to the proposed meet-up, because we got breakfast - omnomnom we managed to gain access via the wrong grill. but never-the-less, armed with a map and a compass we made our way around, Starting at cathedral we followed our noses to the smell of a fresh bbq, to see a pre-lit foil tray with no food but never mind! we plodded on, after speaking to two people who stayed over night.we attempted to get to the northern section (as we thought this was where everyone was headed), so following the map we soon lost track of where on the map we were, so vaguely following north, we somehow ended up going around 4 times and thought lets try and get back to catherdral and start again, so we plotted and pondered and eventually we turned up, about 1-2pm just as everyone finish a group shot as was on their way out, so after a few minutes to get our breath back and say our goodbyes, we decided to head back to the entrance and head to the northern section once more. So after a few twists and turns, over a few falls, we still got lost, but suddenly we saw a sign! a big square tank, after looking at the map, it sure was a eureka moment! So yeah after that we didnt get lost again, but on the way out we ended up getting trapped in the dead routes once more and could find the way home! but needless to say, we're alive! Also thanks to Phill, Les, Ben for lighting up the tunnels, and inviting me along! Anywho, sorry to drag on a bit, but here's some photos =) Thanks! Please check Out my other photos! http://www.flickr.com/photos/mperryphotography/
  7. Another one for the archives really,but still important as most if not all of what I filmed is still there.First visited in 2005 for a post sunday dinner walk,then became one of my obsessions.Be gentle with the quality of pics due to me using a simple Kodak Digi point n shoot..never got into DSLR`s till late in my Urbex career. Some History: Yatesbury is a village adjacent to Cherhill on the A4 road between Calne and Marlborough in Wiltshire, England. RAF Yatesbury is a former Royal Air Force airfield well known to many airmen who served in the second world war. The airfield was first established in the first world war and was developed into a permanent camp in the interwar years especially from 1936 onwards before finally closing in the 1960s. Before closure the camp was home to the Radar and Wireless training school which transferred to Locking .The aircraft hangars and air strip, although now farmland, can still be seen from the A4. Yatesbury today has a population of approximately 150 people. And that was Yatesbury early 2005..more to come sadly!!!
  8. This was day 2 of our Wiltshire trip and was really nice to explore,must admit i personally didnt wander as far as frosty and tb's did as the farmhouse cider had well and truely kicked in so myself maniac and obscurity had a shorter wander on our own.Raptor jesusturned up in the middle of the night which was a nice touch to the evening More info can be found here..http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown's_Folly Could have covered more ground but id had cider and feet where killing me and all the tea lights looked pretty !

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