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Found 5 results

  1. WOLVERTON WORKS - SEPTEMBER 2015 I cannot keep away from Wolverton and recently i clocked up my tenth visit since May 2014. To celebrate the occasion i got rather wet, but nothing could ever dampen my love of this classic train derp. Wolverton railway works was established in Wolverton, Buckinghamshire by the London and Birmingham Railway Company in 1838 at the midpoint of the 112 miles (180 km)-long route from London to Birmingham. The line was developed by Robert Stephenson following the great success of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway line. The Victorian era new towns of Wolverton and New Bradwell were built to house the workers and service the works. The older towns of Stony Stratford and Newport Pagnell grew substantially too, being joined to it by a tramway and branch line (known as the "Newport Nobby"), respectively. The trams were also hauled by steam locomotives: the tram cars were certainly the largest ever in the UK and possibly the world. In modern times Wolverton railway works remains notable as the home of the British Royal Train but otherwise is very much reduced from its heyday. As of 2013, the facility is much reduced: a full-scale train maintenance, repairs and refurbishment works is operated at the western end of the site, the central area is derelict but slated for redevelopment, the eastern end is a Tesco store with canal-side housing development at the extreme eastern end. With the inevitable bouts of uncontrollable laughter brought about by the latest voyage subsiding, it was time to steady my machine for a few snaps. The tune 'Welcome to the jungle, it gets worse here everyday...' springs to mind: 1. 2. 3. 4. At this point i would like to say i have attempted to omit in my report the scrawls of pathetic graffiti tags, smashed windows, destroyed signs and train doors. All this damage has occurred in the last two months. A wanky 'tag' has even appeared on the long training school sign. This place stood untouched for decades slowly finding its way back to mother nature and now it is at the mercy of the local low life. 5. 6. 7. 8. This machine was still located on floor one back in May. Perhaps some of the local low life are underneath it . 9. Passage to the Foremans Office is getting to be a bit of a challenge . 10. 11. 12. A life time of ridicule. Spelling your name slightly differently will not help . 13. A first aid box would be useful here. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. That's all folks, hope you enjoyed
  2. History The Wolverton Works was developed by Robert Stephenson in 1838 after having great success in Manchester and Liverpool. In the Victorian era, Wolverton and as the surrounding towns of Stony Stratford and Newport Pagnell were vastly populated to house workers for the train works. The trams were also hauled by steam locomotives: the tram cars were certainly the largest ever in the UK and possibly the world. In modern times Wolverton railway works remains notable as the home of the British Royal Train but otherwise is very much reduced from its heyday. As of 2013, the facility is much reduced: a full-scale train maintenance, repairs and refurbishment works is operated at the western end of the site, the central area is derelict but slated for redevelopment, the eastern end is a Tesco store with canal-side housing development at the extreme eastern end. After Railcare went into receivership in September 2013 Knorr-Bremse took over the site as the current owners. (Sourced largely from wikipeadia) The Explore Explored with Southside Assassin. I have been looking at exploring the Wolverton Works for some time now, but sketchy access routes, deadly, collapsing ceilings and sinking and treacherous floorboards have since prevented me from doing so. Anyway, Southside Assassin with his experience in this site convinced me that it was still safe and possible to do so. So, it appears that access routes are getting harder and harder – as security get wiser to explorers and vandals entering. Once inside, treading carefully was the name of the game as many unstable paths lead ahead. Much of this site is made from wood and as a result has deteriorated rapidly over time. Massive sections of the roof are caving in at an alarming rate and smashing through the already swollen floorboards making certain areas almost inaccessible. Despite the uncomfortable environment this site provided, it more than made up for visually and proved to be an absolute diamond in the rough, ranking as one of my top explores. There are many sites to be behold here; including old tools and machinery, old railway signs and some great aerial opportunities. As we neared the end of our explore Southside Assassin swore he heard voices coming from the next room, which I initially disbelieved. After a few more minutes we heard what sounded like a security radio, so we hid in the darkness and waited for the intruders to pass. After a peep around the nearest corner it appeared that 4 local lads had entered the site and decided they wanted to check out the Wolverton Works. They were neither explorers nor vandals, just had a bit to drink and were curious of what was inside – They were really nice guys mind, but after climbing a staircase and watching it collapse underneath them, they soon realised that this place is no joke and thoroughly unforgiving, especially if you are intoxicated. We all left together in the end. They even gave us a free ride in a speed boat. I must once again thank Southside Assassin for all the help and advice in cracking this tough nut. Pictures Thank you all for reading my report, I hoped you liked. The Lone Shadow
  3. Wolverton Railway Works History Wolverton railway works was established in Wolverton, Buckinghamshire, by the London and Birmingham Railway Company in 1838 at the midpoint of the 112 miles (180 km)-long route from London to Birmingham. The line was developed by Robert Stephenson following the great success of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway line. The Victorian era new towns of Wolverton and New Bradwell were built to house the workers and service the works. The older towns of Stony Stratford and Newport Pagnell grew substantially too, being joined to it by a tramway and branch line (known as the "Newport Nobby"), respectively. The trams were also hauled by steam locomotives: the tram cars were certainly the largest ever in the UK and possibly the world. In modern times Wolverton railway works remains notable as the home of the British Royal Train but otherwise is very much reduced from its heyday. As of 2013, the facility is much reduced: a full-scale train maintenance, repairs and refurbishment works is operated at the western end of the site, the central area is derelict but slated for redevelopment, the eastern end is a Tesco store with canal-side housing development at the extreme eastern end. My Visit Visited with Southside Assassin, was a great explore, for some reason I wasn't expecting much from Wolverton, perhaps just the description of Railway works and not being a trainspotter, it didn't really get my juices flowing. I couldn't have been more wrong!! Once inside I could see this was going to be a great explore, it has everything, high parts, underground cellars, industrial equipment, in fact I would liken it to a mini Millennium Mills type explore. We mooched around for 5hrs in this place, I loved it! Once again thank you to Southside Assassin for introducing me to this little nugget. The place is mostly made of wood, so hasnt stood the test of time very well, its very spongy and downright dangerous in some places, not sure how much longer this place has left, not long! The Cellars Lower Floor 1st Floor Thank you for looking!
  4. Wolverton Works... A great location, explored with the usual great company of Session9, and a non-member. An early start again, and the usual monster breakfast washed down with some coco-pops, or vice versa, too damn early to remember. Without a doubt the funniest access and egress plan to date, I really wish I could mention it and share the photos but it would give away access information. Rosie and Jim were not impressed.... Some history, shamelessly stolen... Wolverton railway works was established in Wolverton, Buckinghamshire, by the London and Birmingham Railway Company in 1838 at the midpoint of the 112 miles (180 km)-long route from London to Birmingham. The line was developed by Robert Stephenson following the great success of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway line. The Victorian era new towns of Wolverton and New Bradwell were built to house the workers and service the works. The older towns of Stony Stratford and Newport Pagnell grew substantially too, being joined to it by a tramway and branch line (known as the "Newport Nobby"), respectively. The trams were also hauled by steam locomotives: the tram cars were certainly the largest ever in the UK and possibly the world. In modern times Wolverton railway works remains notable as the home of the British Royal Train but otherwise is very much reduced from its heyday. As of 2013, the facility is much reduced: a full-scale train maintenance, repairs and refurbishment works is operated at the western end of the site, the central area is derelict but slated for redevelopment, the eastern end is a Tesco store with canal-side housing development at the extreme eastern end. 1. 2. 3. Brew Time 4. 5. A few from the massive hanger-style workshops 6. This one involved a bit of dot-twitching climbing 7. 8. Lil old cart 9. Saw and Tool sharpening room 10. 11. 12. 13. Silver Eagle Disco with nice 5-digit phone number 14. 15. Mini Tractor area 16. Yeah whatever... 17. Rail News from 1988 18. 19. Udders and groovy drain pipe 20. The exit, and on to the second part of the comedy exfiltration... As always, thanks for looking and any feedback always appreciated ïÂÅ
  5. Big Sheds, used to make trains, carriages, stable the royal pimp wagon and sell Tescos goods. This place was huge, shame I spent most of the time trying not to shit myself as the trots had struck And the floors are fucked, and the drop would shatter most ankles Photos, lots of photos: The part of the works we visited was the saw mill, paint shed and smithy/forge - the top part of this map http://www.adarkertrantor.co.uk/wp-cont ... s-1873.jpg Anyone remember this lovely BR colour? We headed underneath the buildings, well we entered into the basement - down here, all the sawdust was extracted to bags The Smithy, also known as the most over grown warehouse in Europe. Took us ages to find a way in, but Alex's super strong neck muscles opened up a tiny hatch! Sorry for the large amount of pictures, but I couldn't help it, this place was COOL!
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