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Found 8 results

  1. first report in a while, been busy in france + havent seen anything from this place so thought id share it. It was one of those lucky stumble upon by accident explores, which are always nice, certainly not epic to look at but its nice knowing every corner you walk round is going to be something new that you wont have seen it on someone elses report already. I was actually in the area looking for waterfalls to go and have a jungle shower as we'd been camping up the road, zigged when i should have zagged and came across this. couldnt find much history apart from the local rag circa feb 09 and little from historic england historic england- HISTORY: Tansley Wood Mill is a substantially complete example of a late C18, first generation water- powered textile factory, whose form is strongly influenced by, and is a near-contemporary of Sir Richard Arkwright's pioneering cotton spinning factory at nearby Cromford. The site retains clear evidence of phased development, and of the enhancement of its water power-producing capacity, https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1389284 local rag Plans to convert a former Tansley textile mill into flats and offices have been given the go-ahead. Council chiefs gave the green light to a major redevelopment of Tansley Wood Mills, in Lower Lumsdale, on Tuesday. The historic woodland building is to be restored and redeveloped after officers said the scheme would regenerate what was formerly an important employment site. Plans, submitted by applicant Paddock Motors, include converting the Grade II-listed mill into flats, turning the old forge building into a restaurant, four craft studios, office space and commercial units. Planning co-ordinator for the scheme, Bill Clay, said: "It is an exceptional attractive and special location in this historical wooded valley. "It is a wonderful environment to be working in, particually as we are local people. What we are doing is finding a new use for an important historical building and ensuring it has a future. "It is also a very important employment site, historically, and we want to take it into the future in terms of returning it to an employment site." District council planning officers said the site would benefit nature conservation, landscape restoration and secure the future of a listed building. A previous bid to develop the building was rejected by the Secretary of State in 2005, saying it could be detrimental to the character and appearance of the area. Read more: http://www.matlockmercury.co.uk/news/local/tansley-mill-s-conversion-plan-is-approved-1-871469#ixzz4BCYQORUw picturegraphs IF anyone knows what the flying fuck this is can you let me know and lets not forget the real reason i was in thee valley thanks for looking kids, happy explorin
  2. The History George Barnsley and Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883. George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street, The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and then in 1852 to Cornish works Cornish street. They had by this time also increased their product range to include steel files and shoe & butchers knives. They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades, shoe knives and leather workers tools. In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd. The Explore Having seen this quite a lot but very few and far between at the same time this was one place that I wanted to see. The same applied to @hamtagger. One not so cold February morning we made our way to Sheffield with Mr Barnsley's Cornish works in sight. Firstly thanks to @Fekneejit if it wasn't for you we would have probably been pounced on by squatters, wandering aimlessly around a courtyard continuing our debate on where the squatter we followed in had gone or even worse, slipped on a mouldy orange and be lost forever in the lonesome little area that aided us with getting in. Anyway, we got in. Walking through the first few bits it was difficult to see how this was going to turn in to something amazing. But lo and behold we carried on, getting excited over retro wallpaper and seeing familiar names etched in to the dirt on the windows we found what we had been looking for. We both got quite carried away. Spotting things that we had both seen in previous reports and some stuff that we hadn't. It was quite noticeable in areas where things had been moved, gone missing or just ruined. Wandering off in different directions and then swapping to not get in each others way. It was a great day and I am pretty pleased to have finally seen George Barnsley & Son. Anyway, on with the pics 1 2 3 - Everyone should be a lover of shit retro wallpaper 4 5 6 - I loved these, a real slice of history and nice to see along with a lot of the place not trashed. 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Thanks for looking!
  3. Putting this in here due to it being a live site and possibly part owned by Network Rail and i do not wish them to find me lol... SK/Admins if this needs to be in public forums please feel free to move it and remove this top bit, ta Explored with Raz A bit of History; Selby coalfield (also known as the Selby complex, or Selby 'superpit') was a large scale deep underground mine complex based around Selby, North Yorkshire, England, with pitheads at Wistow Mine, Stillingfleet Mine, Riccall Mine, North Selby Mine, Whitemoor Mine and at Gascoigne Wood Mine; all coal was brought to the surface and treated at Gascoigne Wood, being distributed onwards by rail. The primary purpose of the pit was to supply coal for electrical power generation; much of it was used in the nearby Aire valley power stations. Mining peaked in 1993–4 at 12 million tonnes. The mines were acquired by RJB Mining in 1997 after the privatisation of the coal industry; loss of subsidy, geological problems, and low UK coal prices made the pits unprofitable by the 21st century. Closure was announced in 2002, and mining completely ceased by 2004. The Explore; We started by trawling google maps and after a series of fails we came across this old mine. Now at first glance it appears to be almost flattened on maps but apon closer inspection (over 4 rolls of razor wire and a chain link fence) we found there to be quite a bit more. So a bit of ninjering about was in order. The site itself is connected with no barriers to a large and very regularly used rail sidings and there is a hell of a lot of movement on there for a "derelict site". The site also plays host to a haulage company and a ton of diggers and LATV's so there is possibly some mining work going on here on the small scale however further research has uncovered nothing to support this so im really just guessing. And then our luck ran out and half way through an exposure Mr Secca fancied a fag 20 ft from us which prompted our hasty retreat... How unthoughtful of him Cheers for looking
  4. Visited with juicerail, on arrival it was apparent that the storms had done us a favour by blowing the hoarding over so it didn't take us long to find a way inside. On the ground floor three panels of wood covering the lift shafts with black streaks running down them reminded me slightly of the bleeding doors bizarrely. Aside from those every floor was pretty much identical, stripped bare and ready for development so we headed straight for the roof to catch the sunset. We were soon followed by two Chinese lads with their cameras. Probably not the greatest idea to be wandering about up there in broad daylight as unbeknown to us a member of the public had spotted us and called the police fearing one of us was about to commit suicide. Luckily we caught the best of the sunset before we heard a symphony of sirens heading for us and we realised our days were numbered. Four police cars, one on every corner of the building awaited us so we headed downstairs to take our telling off and were sent on our way without too much of a drama. The story behind the monstrosity: This spectacularly ugly 1960s concrete tower block has been a sizeable blot on the Colliers Wood skyline in south London for years on end. The Colliers Wood Tower has enjoyed several names over the years, starting life as the “Lyon Tower†(after its original occupants, property company, Ronald Lyon Holdings), as well as â€ÂThe Vortex†and the â€ÂBrown & Root Towerâ€Â, and several unprintable names. A truly hated building, the tower got off to a bad start when the first attempt at construction was found to contain serious errors, so the three storeys that had already been built were demolished and the project started again from scratch. Such is its unpopularity, it romped home to be crowned the ugliest building in London in a 2006 BBC poll, and it also made the top 12 in Channel 4′s UK-wide Demolition programme in 2005. The same BBC poll quoted an architect working for Golfrate Property Management (the current owners) as saying the building was due a make-over and new lease of life. By 2009, the building was in such a parlous state that the ground and first floor windows and doors were boarded up, and green netting draped across the sides to prevent falling debris causing injury to passers by. There was also reports of the premises being used for making porn movies.... Sometime in Spring 2011, two cosmetic slabs of cladding were attached to the building to give an indication of how its appearance may be improved, while the adjacent spiral car park was finally demolished in June 2011. These are a much lighter colour than the underlying concrete surface and would change the look of the Tower significantly if installed across the building but subsequently no more significant have taken place. Planning permission has been granted for the conversion of the Tower and an extension to the north (towards Colliers wood underground station) to provide 150 apartments, with shops on the ground floor. The planning permission also allows for an extension to the south (to be built as part of a second phase) providing another 68 apartments. In February 2014, Criterion put out tenders out for their ‘Construction Work Packages’; this is for contractors to build-out the scheme. These tenders will be assessed in March 2014. The construction team is anticipated to be in place, and on-site in April 2014. Once on-site works commence, the scheme build-out will be around 18 months. Anticipated completion is autumn 2015. The pics: 1. 2. 3. The sort of bleeding doors..... 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. A few more piccies here: Colliers Wood Tower - a set on Flickr Thanks for looking
  5. Some pics from this once excellent, now demolished morgue that was part of the Harold Wood Hospital in Essex. Not too many locations like this in the UK at present, few and far between! Visited in July 2011.
  6. This was a quick fly by visit to Harold Wood purely for the famous morgue. Visited with, wait for it... Skeleton Key, Priority 7, Trog, Wevsky, Silver Rainbow, Space Invader, Obscurity and a non member called Ben. Yup 9 of us in a morgue, tripods everywhere all getting in the way of each others shots!!! It was a frigging nightmare!!! This is for the history buffs............... The hospital was opened in 1909 by West Ham County Borough council, as the Grange convalescent home for children, which operated with the nearby Plaistow fever hospital. The Grange had been a private house, built in 1884 by John Compton, owner of the Gubbins estate. The convalescent home was maintained by the county borough until the Second World War, as an emergency hospital. After the war it became a permanent hospital, and in the 1960s was significantly enlarged. The hospital later became part of the Barking, Havering and Redbridge Hospitals NHS Trust. It was closed on 13 December 2006 with patients and functions relocated to Queen's Hospital and to King George Hospital. The site vacated by the hospital has been earmarked for a 470-home housing development. The original plan to keep certain NHS facilities has been superseded and the entire plot has been approved for residential development. Local residents are opposing the proposal of over 800 dwellings, including a 9 storey block. Before we done the morgue we had a quick mooch around the hospital and found this gem, you have heard of the famous fire extinguisher room, well meet the floor buffer room............ On to the meaty bit............
  7. Went out on a "Hospital" day with Mr Skeleton Key. Started out at Highwood in Brentwood and then ended up here Harold Wood Hospital History I'm sure that you may have read this before but here goes............ The hospital was opened in 1909 by West Ham County Borough council, as the Grange convalescent home for children, which operated with the nearby Plaistow fever hospital. The Grange had been a private house, built in 1884 by John Compton, owner of the Gubbins estate. The convalescent home was maintained by the county borough until the Second World War, as an emergency hospital. After the war it became a permanent hospital, and in the 1960s was significantly enlarged. The hospital later became part of the Barking, Havering and Redbridge Hospitals NHS Trust. It was closed on 13 December 2006 with patients and functions relocated to Queen's Hospital and to King George Hospital. The site vacated by the hospital has been earmarked for a 470-home housing development. The original plan to keep certain NHS facilities has been superseded and the entire plot has been approved for residential development. Local residents are opposing the proposal of over 800 dwellings, including a 9 storey block. An Indoor Lawn We waited for 45 minutes but still no waitress!!! The guest list!!! A man in black walking his dog The Roof Sorry it's a bit pic heavy but I couldn't narrow it down anymore Thanks for looking
  8. I wasn't going to bother with a report, but I think I had just about enough photos to make it worthwhile, so may as well. Being very bored at the weekend, myself, Frosty and Obscurity decided to take ourselves off here to have a looksie. It was also the first exploring outing of the new car, the first of many I'm sure! Our visit to this place was cut short by Mr security guard together with dog handler and badly trained dog, and a visit from the police who were very professional and just let us on our way. Becasue of this minor setback we only got to see inside the big main hospital building and didn't get to see the mortuary or other parts of the complex like we were hoping. However Harold Wood is more than a mortuary (even if the rest of it is quite knackered.) Harold wood hospital closed its doors in 2006, and plans were submitted for housing. As far as I can work out these plans are being objected to by local residents resulting in a long drawn out process and leaving the site in limbo at the moment. This place is used by Air Soft players, there were thousands of pellets everywhere inside the place, and players on another part of the site when we were in the building. It's a good job we exited that building when we did, as it was their next playing area and that could have hurt lots! We managed precisely one building before being busted, although it is the biggest one it is the least interesting. Anyway, have some pics! 1. Outside 2. Operating Theatres 3. 4. Corridors etc. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. There are some bits and pieces left. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Mint Bathroom 16. Very Pink. thanks for looking! Maniac.
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