Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Dubbed Navigator

      Style   11/21/2017

      Hello - we are pleased to announce that there is now a light version of the style. If you wish to use it, go to the bottom left of the site where there is an option to change it 

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'yorkshire'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors,Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads
  • Discussion Forums
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
    • Latest News
    • Camera and Photography Advice
    • Websites and Links

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Found 32 results

  1. History Going to be brief as this is everywhere, I'd recommend rafchurchfenton.org.uk if you're looking for a solid reference on the subject. RAF Church Fenton was opened in 1937, during WWII it had a defensive role protecting the northern Industrial cities from bombing raids. It also hosted the first American volunteer 'Eagle Squadron' during this period. Much of its postwar history was dominated by an emphasis on its role as a training airfield and from 1998 to 2003 Church Fenton was the RAF's main Elementary Flying Training airfield. On 25 March 2013 it was announced that Church Fenton would close by the end of the year. The site was bought by a local entrepreneur in late 2014 and the airfield now caters for private flights, having been renamed Leeds East Airport. The Explore Not much to say here. There's a bit of building going on on some adjacent land, whether this means the airfield owner has more significant plans for the derelict portion of the site I have no idea. All in all despite lots of talk of run-ins with police and security it was a very relaxed mooch, albeit slightly disorientating at points with the overgrown and repetitive nature of everything. There's not a great deal in the way of ephemera or artefacts, just lots of peely paint, first-floor ferns and other fairly natural pretty decay. By and large aside from some new (crap) graffiti very little changed between my visits. The Pictures I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. XIII. XIV. XV. XVI. XVII. Thanks for looking. If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line. Cheers, Thirteen.
  2. No history unfortunately, and it will soon be luxury apartments Narrowly avoiding death with Raz, Jamie_P & Rott3nWood. The Explore; So we went for a look at the Conditioning House but other than teleportation i couldnt see a way in. So not worth traversing a wall with concreted glass on the top and a gate covered in Razor Wire... Still always come out with a positive right so going with that frame of mind, if i'd have slipped i'd have received ghetto acupuncture free of charge - Sweet So over the road we went and after crossing the needle forrest (Not nice pine needles if you catch my drift) we had a look around this place. Nothing spectacular and not really worth the risk of aids or being mauled by the dogs loose in the building or even the dodgey as fook floors but i still managed to chuck together a decent amount of photos; Thanks for looking
  3. Explored with Rott3nW00d & Raz; So the last report was killing me as there wasn't one single decent photo out of the lot... So we went for a revisit History; Firbeck Hall was formerly the home of 19th-century architect and writer Henry Gally Knight who is assumed to have been a principal information source for Walter Scott during the writing of Ivanhoe. Firbeck Hall was built in 1594 by William West, who made a fortune practising law and serving as an associate to Gilbert Talbot, 7th Earl of Shrewsbury from 1580 to 1594. West was the author of a legal textbook called Symbolaeographia. In his will of 1598, West stipulated that "a grave stone be set for me and my said wife in Firbeck Church, and ingraven with our arms and names and some posy." Country Club In 1935 a Sheffield stockbroker, Cyril Nicholson, opened the hall as a country club, investing £80,000 in its renovation. The interior was dramatically modernised and featured a mirror-walled ballroom and an elaborate and versatile state-of-the-art lighting system. There was also a heated outdoor swimming pool. Membership fees ranged from three to seven guineas, and the club was patronised by the likes of Amy Johnson and the then Prince of Wales. Such was the reputation of the club, that the BBC transmitted its weekly Saturday show "Late Night Dance Music" with Henry Hall, Carroll Gibbons and Charlie Kunz from Firbeck. Second World War – present day At the outbreak of the Second World War, the hall was used by Sheffield Royal Infirmary and the Royal Air Force, with the adjacent aerodrome becoming RAF Firbeck. After the War, the building was bought by the Miners Welfare Commission for use as a rehabilitation centre for injured miners. This centre closed in 1984. It was purchased by Cambridge Construction. From then the Hall fell into a state of disrepair. The Explore; As mentioned above i have recently posted a report on this location but the photos and quality were dire. So off we went for another look. 1 year had passed since our last visit and if the place was knackered before its even worse now!! floors that were safe last time have collapsed, some of the doors were bearing the full weight of the wall/house above them and if you tried to move quickly anywhere you were pretty likely to be seriously injured if not worse. All the upstairs in now pretty much unaccessable unless you have a death wish so we missed out on one of the best stair cases i've seen All in all this place will soon not need to be knocked down as it will have fallen down of its own accord and if you do go, the swimming pool is the best bit by far Photos; Wrote my page name on this plate on my last visit Spent about 45 mins playing with long exposure at the end - brilliant fun If you got this far, thanks for looking
  4. Explore with Raz & a non member. I was considering code naming this Dodgey Floor Galore due to the fact that while exploring Raz ended up waist deep in the buildings foundations looking like he was wading through floorboards Some of the rooms in this old place look like they were designed by Tony Hawk and would make for the worlds best albiet most dangerous skatepark! History Firbeck Hall was formerly the home of 19th-century architect and writer Henry Gally Knight who is assumed to have been a principal information source for Walter Scott during the writing of Ivanhoe. Firbeck Hall was built in 1594 by William West, who made a fortune practising law and serving as an associate to Gilbert Talbot, 7th Earl of Shrewsbury from 1580 to 1594. West was the author of a legal textbook called Symbolaeographia. In his will of 1598, West stipulated that "a grave stone be set for me and my said wife in Firbeck Church, and ingraven with our arms and names and some posy." Country Club In 1935 a Sheffield stockbroker, Cyril Nicholson, opened the hall as a country club, investing £80,000 in its renovation. The interior was dramatically modernised and featured a mirror-walled ballroom and an elaborate and versatile state-of-the-art lighting system. There was also a heated outdoor swimming pool. Membership fees ranged from three to seven guineas, and the club was patronised by the likes of Amy Johnson and the then Prince of Wales. Such was the reputation of the club, that the BBC transmitted its weekly Saturday show "Late Night Dance Music" with Henry Hall, Carroll Gibbons and Charlie Kunz from Firbeck. Second World War – present day At the outbreak of the Second World War, the hall was used by Sheffield Royal Infirmary and the Royal Air Force, with the adjacent aerodrome becoming RAF Firbeck. After the War, the building was bought by the Miners Welfare Commission for use as a rehabilitation centre for injured miners. This centre closed in 1984. It was purchased by Cambridge Construction. From then the Hall fell into a state of disrepair. Apologies for the low quality images, facebook is the devil Photos; Thanks for reading
  5. Explored with Raz & a non member Bit of history from Raz (being an info pirate again) Designed by JB Chantrell, St. Paul's was completed in 1846 in an Early English style featuring a large gothic tower overlooking the village of Denholme. The constructions of the church cost £3,700 in total, a number that would have been significantly higher if not for the members of the parish contributing to the construction in their spare time. St Paul's Church was granted grade II listed status meaning that it may not be demolished, extended, or altered without special permission from the local planning authority, but in 1997, soon after it's 150th anniversary the ceiling and roof were deemed unsafe and the church closed soon after this for repairs. Upon further inspection the repairs needed were found to be extensive and with great reluctance the building and part of the churchyard were put up for sale. Although the old church building is now closed (and ruined) the graveyard is still open to new burials. Explore; So this old girl has been on the list for quite some time now but has always been put off for other things. While sploring an old quarry in the area we decided to take a wander over. As you can see the place is wrecked but that roof is beautiful Photos; Quality isn't the best because i've taken them off my facebook page; my camera decided to reformat the memory card and relieve me of 600 photos. Dont you just love technology!! As always, thanks for looking
  6. Living in Castleford, Yorkshire, you can't really go anywhere without seeing evidence of the once booming coal mining industry in the area. This old girl, locally known simply as "The Iron Bridge" is just one example. Ive put July 15 on the header simply because that is when i took these photos when in reality i've been going down to it for years from 14 to get pissed. Classy. A little back ground on the mine; Wheldale Colliery was located on Wheldon road, Castleford. Sinking operations began in 1868, two shafts, both 13 ft dia. Were sunk to the Beeston seam at a depth of 564 yards. Production started in 1870. One of the main investors was a Dr Holt and for a number of years the colliery was known as the doctors pit. In 1899 the Wheldale coal company and Fryston coal company amalgamated. In 1919 Wheldale coal company amalgamated with Allerton Bywater collery to form Airedale Collieries LTD. Initial manpower was around 1000 men and boys and produced around 200000 tonnes of coal a year. On the 22nd Febraury 1923 9 men were killed in an underground explosion. Wheldale had no coal washing plant. In the 1930's a mineral line was laid from Wheldale to Fryston so that coal that required washing went to Fryston colliery. In 1947 the Wheldale colliery was nationalised. In 1949 major investment was undertaken. Skips were installed in the downcast shaft. There were 2 skips, each with a capacity of 6 tonnes giving a capacity of 350 tonnes per hour. The Downcast shaft had an electric winder which had two 475 H.P. motors. The upcast shaft was the men and materials shaft, this had 2 single deck cages. Each cage could hold two tubs. The winder had a 180 H.P. motor. The colliery was completely electrified. The shafts at Wheldale had 6 insets, Warren House seam at 183m, Haigh Moor seam at 258m, Flockton Thick seam at 346m, Middleton Little seam at 400m, Silkstone seam at 436m and Beeston seam at 516m. When the colliery was modernised in 1949 conveyor belts were installed, gate roads were 30 inch belts, trunk conveyors were 36 inch in width. The flockton seam had two bunkers, pit bottom bunker of 250 tonnes capacity and an inbye bunker of 200 tonnes. Dirt from repairs in the return gates were transported to the pit bottom in tubs. Material supplies and man riding was carried out using diesel locomotives. Coal was mined using AFC mounted trepanners. There was no coal preparation plant at the colliery. Coal smaller than 1 inch was sent to Glasshoughton Coking plant or to powerstations. Coal above 1 inch was sent to Fryston colliery for treatment. Wheldale produced around 400000 tonnes of coal a year from a manpower of 650 men. The coal was transported by locomotive to Fryston or by barge to Ferrybridge powerstation. When Fryston colliery closed in 1985 a barrel washer was set up to clean coal at Wheldale. In 1982 Wheldale broke its yearly production record with an output of 500000 tonnes for the year. Wheldale colliery closed in October 1987 after producing coal for 117 years. The colliery site was then cleared after salvage operations were complete. The shafts were never filled. A methane capture plant was built to convert the methane gas from the old workings into electricity. This power station generates 10MW of power and provides electricity for about 8000 homes. Hickson & Welch Chemical Co. in the background Thanks for looking
  7. Explored with Raz History; Dalton Mills was once the largest textile mill in the region, employing over 2000 workers. It was built by Joseph Craven in 1869, replacing the original mill which was owned by Rachel Leach in the 1780's. The mill was named Dalton Mills after the manager employed by Rachel Leach, a man called Dalton. In its heyday between 1869 and 1877 the mill provided jobs for workers all over Keighley and the Worth Valley. As the textile industry declined, the fortunes of Dalton Mills changed and up until 2004, it had been virtually empty for almost a decade. John Craven, the great-great grandson of Joseph, who had built the mill, eventually chose to sell Dalton Mills, to ensure it’s survival. Part of the renovation of the Clock Tower has included restarting the landmark clock which has not ticked for 25 years. In the mill's heyday, thousands of workers relied on the clock to get to work on time, but the hands had not moved for a quarter of a century.The clock was repaired, so it can display the time to the whole of Dalton Lane again. The explore; After a couple of failed attempts we returned with new resolve! Mishing through pikey yards and trying every window we could find we finally found our way in! Past asbestos warnings and fire damage into the most asthetically pleasing mill i've ever seen. Workshops, large open spaces and the signs of redevelopment. Plus an extremely dodgey floor! - what else can you want? Few snaps from the day; Dirty bit of HDR to finish If you got this far, thanks for looking
  8. Various Visits with -Raz- and a selection of non members Bit of History; Built in 1806/7, this building was origninally the town hall for sheffield. It was extending in1833 and again in 1866 this time with the addition of the clock tower. In the 1890's the town hall was converted into the Crown court house as it was now too small for the growing population of sheffield to be a viable town hall. The courts used to be linked to the near by police station however these tunnels have now been bricked up. In the 1990's the courts moved to the new premisis and the last attendance was on the 27th of October 1995 leaving the old court house to rot. The building is now Grade 2 listed and is considered one of the most at risk buildings by the victorian society. Explores; Always a good one dispite the close proximity to the police station and high streets of lower sheffield, and the addition of the noisiest, most awkward entrance known to man, this is usually a quiet explore where you can really get a feel for the place. Every time i have been we have been joined by other explorers such as TrevBish. On one particular explore we arrived a little early so we slept in the courts for a few hours waiting for the place to get light! Never ever turn down a selfie oppurtunity! Apologies for the HDR in this one, i did go through a stage where everything was ruined by it If you got this far, thanks for reading
  9. UK RAF Driffield 2015

    History; Ripped from wiki (Naughty) Explored with a non member; Carla The first aerodrome to occupy the site was made up of wooden and brick buildings, similar to those found at Duxford or Hendon. Known as Eastburn, No.21 Training Depot was the first unit to occupy the site from 15 July 1918, joined later by Nos. 202 and 217 Squadrons from March 1919. However, by early 1920, these units had disbanded, leaving a deserted airfield, which was removed some years later. During the early 1930s, Driffield was selected for one of the RAF's expansion scheme aerodromes, with construction work beginning in 1935. This new airfield consisted of five large aircraft hangars, curved round the grass runways that stretched towards the north-west. Placed neatly behind these hangars were the many buildings that made up the camp. Opened in July 1936, RAF Driffield became home to a number of bomber squadrons. By 1938, these had been replaced by No.77 and No.102 Squadrons, and were eventually equipped with the twin-engined Armstrong Whitworth Whitley bomber. Second World War Crews of both No.77 and No.102 Squadrons endured a series of training courses and exercises, so that on the outbreak of war, Driffield was ready for action. The morning of 4 September brought great activity to RAF Driffield. Three aircraft from No.102 Squadron were to drop leaflets during that second night of the war. The fuselages of these bombers were crammed with large parcels of propaganda leaflets, wrapped in brown paper. Access that was normally difficult because of the retracted ventral gun turret, was now extremely challenging through the narrow gaps, between the parcels on either side of the turret. Flying at 15,000 ft, the three aircraft crossed the enemy coastline and maintaining strict radio silence, flew down the Ruhr Valley and into France, releasing their load of leaflets, which were dropped through the aircraft's flare chute. The following night of 5 September, No.77 Squadron was given its opportunity to drop leaflets, when two aircraft repeated the operation. On 15–16 March 1940, two aircraft of No.77 Squadron alone dropped 6,000,000 leaflets during a raid over Warsaw; a mission successfully accomplished, despite difficulties encountered with navigation and atrocious weather conditions. This was followed on 19 March by the first deliberate bombing on German soil, when Whitley aircraft from both Driffield squadrons joined those from RAF Dishforth, who together bombed the mine-laying seaplane base at Hornum on the Island of Sylt. On Thursday, 15 August 1940 there was a German air raid on the airfield. At approximately midday, some 50 Junkers Ju 88 bomber aircraft attacked the aerodrome, killing 13 military personnel and 1 civilian, and destroying 12 Whitley aircraft. The 169 bombs dropped caused extensive damage, with many buildings, including all five hangars, being either damaged or destroyed. Weeks later, the surviving aircraft from both Whitley squadrons departed, leaving Driffield to repair the damage, which remained non-operational until early 1941. With repairs to the airfield complete, Driffield saw a new role in the early months of 1941, as fighters replaced bombers, when No.13 Group Fighter Command took control of the airfield. Equipped with Spitfires and Hurricanes, the three squadrons located at Driffield patrolled the North Sea. April 1941 saw the return of No.4 Group Bomber Command and the formation of two new squadrons, both equipped with the Wellington twin-engined bomber. No.104 Squadron and No.405 Squadron RCAF (the first Royal Canadian Air Force bomber squadron formed) commenced bombing operations against Germany. 9 May 1941 saw the first operation by No.104 Squadron, when six Wellington aircraft were despatched to bomb Bremen. One aircraft failed to reach Germany and returned to Driffield with a jammed rear gun turret. Flying at 16,000 ft, four aircraft managed to release their bombs over Bremen, but were unable to see the results, due to the bright glowing haze of the already burning city. One other aircraft failed to reach the target due to intercom failure, but was able to bomb the secondary target of Wilhelmshaven. Despite both targets being heavily defended, all aircraft and crews returned safely. Other Wellington squadrons posted Driffield during the war were No.158 Squadron, No.466 Squadron RAAF (Royal Australian Air Force) and No.196 Squadron. In 1943, RAF Driffield was temporary closed for the construction of three concrete runways, the longest stretching 6,000 ft, linked by a perimeter track, along the length of which were situated the aircraft dispersals and bomb dump.[5] The airfield became operational again in June 1944 with the return of No.466 Squadron RAAF, now equipped with the heavy four-engined Handley Page Halifax bomber. This unit began operations supporting the Allied invasion of Europe by bombing targets in the Normandy area. 12 August 1944 saw the formation of No.462 Squadron, a second Australian unit. During the months that followed, both squadrons joined forces to hit targets across Europe. On 10 September 1944, a small force of some 69 bombers, including 30 from Driffield, targeted the German occupied garrison and coastal defence battery at Le Havre.[6] This was immediately followed by a much larger force of some 930 aircraft, which dropped 47,000 tons of bombs. The following day, the raid was repeated when 22 aircraft from Driffield, combined with a total of 218 from Bomber Command, again attacked the target. Ten hours later, the German garrison surrendered to allied ground forces. In December 1944, No.462 Squadron moved to Norfolk, leaving No. 466 Squadron to fight on from Driffield. The Australians carried out their final raid of the war on 25 April 1945, when a force of 18 aircraft bombed gun emplacements on the island of Wangerooge. After the Second World War After the war, Driffield became home to a number of training establishments. The first, No. 10 Air Navigation School, flew from 1946, equipped with Avro Anson, twin-engined aircraft, which were employed to fly student navigators on short three-hour flights. The unit's Wellington aircraft, endured flights of up to six hours, flying sometimes at night, down to the Channel Islands, along the English Channel and up the North Sea to Scotland. Replaced in 1948 by No. 204 Advanced Flying School, this unit taught pilots how to fly the fast twin-engined de Havilland Mosquito fighter/bomber, an aircraft built entirely out of wood. In 1949, the jet age reached Yorkshire, when No.203 Advanced Flying School formed at Driffield – replacing the Mosquitoes, which departed with their parent unit. This new school would be the first in the world responsible for teaching a new breed of pilot how to fly fast jet aircraft. There were two sections within the school: No.1 Squadron operated the Gloster Meteor – Britain’s first operational jet fighter, while No.2 Squadron flew the de Havilland Vampire. Before climbing into the cockpit, students underwent four weeks of ground training, learning about jet engines, airframes and the different flying techniques associated with the new and much faster aircraft. This was followed by actual flight training, when pilots were taught basic manoeuvres, aerobatics, formation flying, instrument flying and navigation. Renamed No.8 Flying Training School in June 1954, the unit continued at Driffield before moving to Lincolnshire in July 1955. That September, RAF Driffield reverted to the role of a fighter station, when No.13 Group Fighter Command again took control of the airfield. During this period, Nos. 219 and 33 Squadrons, equipped with the de Havilland Venom night fighter, occupied the airfield until June/July 1957, when both units were disbanded. The following October saw the arrival of the Fighter Weapons School from RAF Leconfield, a unit equipped with a variety of jet aircraft, which itself departed in March 1958. In 1957 the British Government announced that the RAF would deploy 60 nuclear intermediate range ballistic missiles. From November 1958 Driffield would be home to No.98 Squadron, which was equipped with three Douglas Thor missiles, each with a range of 1,750 miles and capable of reaching Moscow. With the length of 60 ft, these missiles were stored horizontally on the ground and were erected only when ready for firing or during training exercises. Although the missiles were British owned, the nuclear warheads were still under American ownership. Accordingly, the United States Air Force maintained a sizeable presence at Driffield. In good bureaucratic fashion, the RAF Launch Officer was expected to sign for the warhead after it had been launched, because technically it was then under British control. The missiles at Driffield were never used and the system was dismantled in 1963. During the late 1960s, Blackburn Buccaneer naval aircraft were flight tested at Driffield, and in the early 1970s, gliders of No.642 Volunteer Gliding School also occupied the airfield, albeit briefly, while RAF Linton on Ouse had its main runway resurfaced. Sadly, there were to be no more happy landings, and in 1977, the airfield and camp were taken over by the British Army, who renamed it Alamein Barracks. By the early 1980s, the runways were removed and the hardcore used in the construction of the Driffield bypass. The control tower and air-raid shelters disappeared, while the hangars that protected aircraft for many years were converted to protect Government surplus grain from the elements. Current use The army used Driffield as a driver training centre, until RAF Leconfield (which was also taken over by the Army in 1977) was enlarged to accommodate those who lived and trained at Driffield. In 1992, the RAF regained ownership of this historic aerodrome, naming it: RAF Staxton Wold – Driffield Site. Once again, the RAF ensign flew over Driffield, but not for long. In 1996, the RAF itself transferred its own personnel and facilities to RAF Staxton Wold, thus bringing an end to 60 years of service. On 28 June 1996, the RAF ensign was lowered for the last time, bringing to an end RAF Driffield. It is used as a CTC (cadet training centre) for army cadets and houses 873 Driffield Squadron air training corps. The site has since been used as a driver training area by DST Leconfield. The Explore; As you can see from the photos this place is totally wrecked. Once a fully functuioning and strategically important RAF base, it now stands almost unrecognisable due to decay and vandalism. All 4 hangars are now used for some kind of Transport/storage company so are out of bounds. Nice walk around with Carla, met a couple of guys camping there who were just as surprised to see us as we were to see them. When we explained what we were doing they seemed very interested and decided they were going to explore the old buildings there too! Few more photos; If you got this far, thanks for looking
  10. Various explores with -Raz- and some non members History; Pilkington Glass was founded in St. Helens in 1826 and the Doncaster site opened in 1922. This site was well located due to the canal which runs along side the factory creating easy transport links on the great canal systems. The factory is situated in the town of Kirk Sandall, a town which pretty much grew to house the work force for the factory in years prior everyone having cars. A pub was built in the town and named in the sites honour “The Glassmaker”. The site was closed in 2008 and has since been an attraction for both metal fairies and Urbexers alike. Various Explores; The first thing you notice about this place is the entrance, possibly the best one I’ve experienced; very cramped and that’s all I’ll say on the matter. The building is well… HUGE, spanning over a 1000ft end to end it dwarfs most industrial derps and it is covered in a horrid red dust (doesn’t come out of car seats). If you have a head for heights there are various cranes to climb and raised walkways to have a walk along. On the lower levels Network Rail apprentices are trained to lay tracks so be aware if they are there. If you got this far, thanks for reading
  11. Explored with –Raz- We had put this explore off for months for some reason, however on the way home from checking out how much of Hanson Brick Works was left (NOTHING) we nipped in for a look. History; Meet Bucyrus Erie, the whopping 1200 tonne open cast mine walking dragline. Known as “Oddball†the industrial giant could walk, yes walk, at 0.2mph which doesn’t sound fast but when it’s the size of 60 double decker busses and that heavy i'd say that was pretty impressive. It was originally built and based in Virginia USA where it served for 4 years before being packed up and shipped over to South Wales in 1952. Since then it has been taken apart and rebuilt plenty of times and has made appearances all across the UK until it came to rest in Swillington (St. Aidens mine). It took a few years out of service after an accident in 1988 when the miners dug too close to the river, effectively turning the mine into a giant pond. £20,000,000 later the mine had been drained and the work there was subsequently completed. In 1999 a group called the “Friends of St. Aidens†restored the dragline with the help of the national lottery and it made its final slug to its current resting place where it now sits as a museum piece and a monument to the great industrial prowess and power of the National Coal Board. If you got this far, thanks for reading More on my page @ www.facebook.com/seldomseenworldue
  12. Evening all, So whats the first thing you think of when you think yorkshire?? tea? pudding? terriers?? im going to assume its not the production of little wooden shoes! however, low and behold here we have just that, originally producing some of the finest wooden brothel creepers in the north, the walkleys clog mill turned into a popular tourist attraction throughout the 80s but tragically fell upon hard times during the 90s and also suffered a substantial fire which wrote it off as an attraction, walkleys sold the site to focus on the operational factory which is still running today. Planning was passed for conversion of the walkleys mill into apartments back in 2006 however nothing has been done with it since. The explore I dont think i made much of an effort with any photos i took here, if you can imagine mac from predator when hes got the mini gun and he's tearing down the rain forest with it, that's basically what i did with my camera, i ran around the place in about 6 mins with the camera on auto, the rest of the time i was playing in ball pits, sliding down slides and playing in wendy houses this place is great fun, its nothing beautiful to look at but there is plenty going on in the place and its just a great little explore to have a good time and a little mess around in! When we pulled up we were greeted by a couple of other "explorers" who it turns out had been pottering about for about 20 minutes trying to find a way in, not sure if explorers was the right term for these boys as they werent really built for this past time bless em. After a quick scout of the perimeter we found our way in, the two big guys stood and watched with sad faces as we did things they knew they simply wouldn't be physically able to, oh yeah this was after one of the big lads invited me to kick a door in with him....hmmmm yeeeeah-maybe another time mate?!? ??: Anyway yeah so we managed to get in without any potential criminal damage or breaking and entering charges, we were on the first floor and i had just started fiddling with a piece of old machinery when i hear the pissing alarm going off, the other 3 had gone down to the ground floor and set it off, we bailed out onto the roof and waited out the alarm and to see if any secca turned up, no one turned up but looks the like ground floor is out of bounds kids! knowing this we headed up to the second floor where we found the slides, ball pit and other fun stuff, santas grotto, weird little dolls, manakins, loads of really random stuff in this place, hence why its a little pic heavy, not because ive tae loads of good photos, just because there was so much going on in the place! Toffee and taste l'histoire from their website. Walkley Clogs is a clog factory where the great British clog is manufactured in its entirety. The company was started by Frank Walkley in 1946. The main styles manufactured at that time were the Safety boot clog, Derby, Gibson and the Bar clog. With slipon styles being produced much later. In 1978 Frank Walkley bought out the famous Maude clog sole works in Hebden Bridge, a company that at its hey day had over 100 employees that turned nothing but clog soles! Walkey Clogs still uses the old machines for turning the wooden clog soles, and manufacturing the irons. The clog making skills used are those skills that have been passed down from generations of Walkley Clogs clog makers. Many of our older clog customers will remember Gordon and Nelson real lovely characters, and John who only recently retired a few years ago.. and not forgetting Arthur who up to 86 years of age still worked making the Walkley clogs for two days a week. Walkey Clogs is proud to keep the old traditional styles and over the years has manufactured many more styles that fit in with today’s markets. Most years Walkley Clogs are seen on the cat walks, and every year work with budding fashion designers who always have their own ideas on clog design. Today Walkley clogs manufactures a wide range of styles of clogs which include wooden sandals and slip-ons and various types of boots and shoes in a good selection of colours. The uppers used are mainly leather but also a non leather clog can be manufactured if required. The company also produces a lovely range of children’s clogs styles and supplies clog dance teams in the UK with dancing clogs. Walkley clogs produces 40 styles plus and offers to make up custom made clogs in any style and any colour. and some photolaughs I DONT BLOODY THINK SO MY OLD FRUIT! CAN YOU SEE THE MOUSE!! ...playing the waiting game thanks for looking kids, take it sleazy!!
  13. This place has been dubbed various names on the internets but I quite like the name Blue Church so I'll stick with that one. After doing the mint St. Saviours we headed towards the looming spire of what's been named 'Blue Church' or 'Miranda Church' owing to it's Chateau Noisy-esque blue vaulted ceiling. This place, comparatively, is a total ruin but shows what I deem to be a wonderful level of dereliction following it's closure in 1997. Myself and Landie Man spent a long time here as I think he enjoyed it as much as I did. The windy, rainy weather certainly gave this place a desolate feeling as well. Standing right at the back of the balcony in the alcove, with the wind blowing a gale behind me and a big drop through a large hole down to the ground floor in front of me was a bit of an arse-twitcher... Thanks for looking, more here as always https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157650369869003
  14. Pilkington's Glass The Explore Drove up to meet Session9 at Doncaster and headed for some industrial goodness and we weren't disappointed. Using the "going in dry" technique as always we had a wander around the outside looking for access. At one point I was boot-deep in mud and water in a large pipe checking out a possible access point when i heard S9 having a meeting with a yappy dog above so I hid in the pipe until it buggered off, whilst slowly sinking. The old sealskinz waterproof socks proving their worth once again Further around the perimeter we got lucky and found a way in... The History (stolen from S9 once again lol) Pilkington Glass was established in St Helens, Merseyside in 1826. The Doncaster site was opened in 1922 at its canalside location in Kirk Sandall. Pilkingtons had a large workforce and the small village of Kirk Sandall grew to provide housing for the workers. There was even a pub nearby named "The Glassmaker" (now rebuilt and re-named "The Glasshouse"). The site eventually ceased production in 2008. The Pictures 1. This area was mahoosive! 2. 3. Unfortunately this gantry crane cab had been wedged shut, otherwise i'd have taken it for a spin.. 4. The font and colour of these hand-painted signs reminded me of New York fire engines for some reason.. 5/6. Many would've taken a picture of the number on the pillar to the left.... 7. I spent a lot of time climbing shit here and ended up pretty much covered in red dusty crap by the end of the day.. 8. Hell minus 300.. 9. 10. 11. 12. Rusty pipe.. 13. A very much live area which appeared to have some newly built train tracks and smelled better than your own fart brand.. 14. Battery Charging Room 15. Moving on to the Engineers Workshop area.. 16. 17. 18. Gogglebox.. 19. Got filthy climbing up here... 20. Gay machinery.. 21. 22. As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  15. UK Opal 3 rooftop Leeds - Mar 15

    After hearing that the roof of this place was accessible i couldn't wait to hit this one, a bit of a ball ache for access to the building but wait around for long enough and the opportunity will arise. At 269ft you cant help but fall in love with the live rooftops and seeing the tiny ant people walking below you oblivious to the fact your up there. Visited with Raz enjoy... thanks guys
  16. Hi OS. This one is an awesome place, after seeing it come up online I knew I had to visit, I thought it had all been redeveloped! A lot more to look at here than I had first assumed also. Here's some history on the place: The hospital was designed on the broad arrow plan by architect J. Vickers Edwards. The 300 acre estate on which the asylum was built was purchased by the West Riding Justices for £18,000 in 1885 and the large gothic complex of stone buildings was formally opened on 8 October 1888. The hospital was intended to be largely self-sufficient, and was provided with its own library, surgery, dispensary, butchery, dairies, bakery, shop, upholster's and cobbler's workshops and a large estate partly devoted to agriculture and market gardening. The patients lived in wards and if they were able, were expected to work towards their keep either on the farm, in the kitchens and laundry, or in various handicrafts. In its final years of operation, High Royds had become outdated and unsuited to modern psychiatric practice. The hospital was closed in stages between 25 February 2003 and June of the same year. As of 2011, the site was being redeveloped as a new village, also called High Royds, retaining some features of the hospital such as the ballroom and the clock tower. Good couple of visits with some of my S.O'C.C can'ts. Pics: The stunning external: Admin staircase: Entrance: Arch and mosaic floor: Stained glass: Corridor junction: Bars: Corridor junction: Group shot.. Green Room: Corridor with bars: Main hall: We checked out some other bits too.. Cheers for looking!
  17. Had a brief look around this place with Ferox (cheers for making it happen & a good day out mate ) wasn't our first choice & we weren't expecting to get in. Weren't in there too long as Ferox spotted the police, weren't sure if they were there for us or not but neither of us fancied finding out so we made the executive decision to leave straight away. The more we thought about it the more we reckon we 'got out by the skin of our teeth' & can't think of any other reason they would of been there. Think the bit we were in was the administration building, the rest of it has been turned into houses, wouldn't mind living in one of the houses just for the fact that it used to be part of an asylum and inside they still have all the grand doorways & windows etc, shame they didn't do the same with whitty (yep he's banging on about whitty again ). Obviously would of been nice to see more but glad we got to see it briefly. History, Copied from Wikipedia "The hospital was designed on the broad arrow plan by architect J. Vickers Edwards. The 300 acre estate on which the asylum was built was purchased by the West Riding Justices for £18,000 in 1885 and the large gothic complex of stone buildings was formally opened on 8 October 1888. The administration building, which is Grade II listed, features an Italian mosaic floor in the main corridor which is decorated with the Yorkshire Rose and black daisies - the latter of which provided inspiration for the title of Black Daisies a television screenplay, filmed at High Royds, which took as its subject the experiences of sufferers of Alzheimers disease. The hospital was intended to be largely self-sufficient, and was provided with its own library, surgery, dispensary, butchery, dairies, bakery, shop, upholster's and cobbler's workshops and a large estate partly devoted to agriculture and market gardening. The patients lived in wards and if they were able, were expected to work towards their keep either on the farm, in the kitchens and laundry, or in various handicrafts. The hospital was formerly connected to the Wharfedale railway line by its own small railway system, this was closed in 1951" The hospital closed in 2003. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  18. Visited With Hamtagger and Session9 Now Public thanks to the wonderful world of Social Media. After a successful morning in York and Leeds we decided to head for our "Main Splore of the Day" We decided that this weekend was the time to get the old girl done before it becomes impossible to enter or destroyed by the youths of Leeds. And getting inside was not an easy task, after checking all of the obvious spots and Hamtagger falling off a roof into a pool of 8 inch water. We decided that the only way in was potentially suicidal. So we went for it. And it was worth every second! Inside, the school really is a beauty, it feels like 3 different locations in one. A modern School, an Old School and a Hospital. I just wish we went there earlier because it was hard to get anything decent in the dark so we had to rush around in the last hour of daylight we had. History LGHS was founded in 1876, at a time when female education was limited but expanding. Frances Lupton and other members of the Ladies’ Honorary Council of the Yorkshire Board of Education decided that campaigning for access to the universities was of little use without better all-round education for girls, equivalent to what boys received at traditional academic grammar school. Established interests prevented the use of existing charitable funds, so Lupton and her colleagues created a new way forward: a joint stock company. The school motto was Age Quod Agis, which means "do what you do". While seemingly tautological at first glance, it is in fact a corruption of the Biblical exhortation, "whatsoever thy turn thy hand to, do it with all thy might". The pupils were divided into four houses, named after the four patron saints of the United Kingdom: Andrew, David, George and Patrick. Girls were placed into the houses that their families had been in before them. There were various house competitions throughout the year, mainly sports and arts orientated, the main one being the house music competition during the spring term. Pictures 1 Classroom 2 The Green Corridor 3 Fake Hospital Sign For the ITV Drama "Monroe" 4 Bathroom in the dark 5 Science Class 6 Classroom steps 7 Hallway steps 8 "Hospital" Props 9 Mattie's Cafe 10 Time to leave? 11 Darkness Falls 12 When you suck at night photography, light paint As always, Thanks for looking
  19. Hey there! Visited this one with Miz Firestorm, Miss Lightyear and Goldie on a bit of a Yorkshire tour. Could have easily spent a few more hours here just wandering around, loved it. Terry's was a chocolate and confectionery maker in York, England. Its history stretched back to 1767, but in 1993 it was taken over by Kraft Foods. The company's headquarters, later renamed The Chocolate Works factory, was closed by Kraft in 2005, and products using the Terry's brand name are now produced in other Kraft facilities in Poland, Sweden, Belgium, and Slovakia. The Terry's name eventually became part of Mondelēz International. In 1767 as Robert Berry opened a shop close to Bootham Bar, York, selling cough lozenges, lemon and orange candied peel and other sweets. Joined by William Bayldon, the partners renamed the business Bayldon and Berry confectionery. Born in Pocklington, Joseph Terry came to York to serve as an apprentice apothecary in Stonegate. On gaining his certificates, he set up as a chemist in Walmgate. But after marrying Harriet Atkinson in 1823, he met her elderly uncle Robert Berry. After William Bayldon left the business, Terry agreed to become a partner in the confectionery business, and after closing his chemists shop joined the confectionery business in St Helen's Square, York. In 1825 after the death of Robert Berry, Terry agreed a new partnership with Robert's son George, renaming the business Terry & Berry. In 1828, George left the business and it was renamed Terry's of York. Using his skills as a chemist, Joseph developed new lines of chocolate, confectionery, sugared sweets, candied peel, marmalade and medicated lozenges. He began using the developing railway network of the North Eastern Railway, to distribute his products over the North of England and as far away as London. In 1923, Frank and Noel Terry joined the family business. They revamped the company, launching new products and bought a site off of Bishopthorpe Road, York on which to develop a new factory known as Terry's Confectionery Works. Built in an Art Deco style, the factory included a distinct clock tower. Opened in 1926, new products including the Chocolate Apple, Terry's Chocolate Orange, and Terry's All Gold were all developed and produced onsite. In 2004, Kraft Foods decided to absorb Terry's, switch production of remaining products All Gold and Chocolate Orange to their own factories in Belgium, Sweden, Poland and Slovakia, and close the plant. The factory closed on 30 September 2005, with the loss of 317 jobs. After all that history.. Photos! Cheers for looking
  20. UK Vincent's Church, June 14

    Visited this one with Goldie and not a bad place at all really. There is a bit of trashing and it looks like it has been worked on over the years but it more than makes up for that with it's features like the ceilings and stained glass. founded in 1853 and greatly expanded over its early years. During World War 2 much of the building was destroyed due to the heavy bombing in the City. In the 1950's the re-building of the church included a new Chapel, replacement of roofs and a new entrance porch, organ loft and choir gallery. St Vincent's Church closed in 1998, and some of its unique internal architectural features have been removed or destroyed for ever. Currently in need of much needed renovation and its future very much uncertain. THanks for lookin'!
  21. ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ So it's a normal mundane Tuesday afternoon at work and a text comes in from ZeroUE. Was I up for exploring a location that's been sealed up for ages and needs visiting ASAP before it's sealed up again? It would be silly not to, so off I goes. Inside was pitch black throughout and seemed much bigger than we expected. Lots of rooms full of random stuff too. Thanks to ZeroUE for the info - and the extra lumens!!! ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Here's some history on it all 'lifted' from elsewhere.. Built in the early 1800's and was the rather grand home of few big cheeses until the early 1920's when it became a private school for girls. Listed status given in November 1966. In 1974 it was home to various council departments including social services, housing and maintenance. It's been unoccupied since 2006 and in 2011 it failed to reach its reserve price at auction. ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ WARNING - This report contains extreme lens distortion that some viewers may find unsettling. ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Well, it is nearly Christmas An original wrought iron cantilever staircase: There was a room upstairs that at one time must have been used for secure document storage. A few items remained and this one was quite moving And finally the original ballroom, most recently used as a council chamber
  22. The History A quick report from this relatively local site. I can't find a report on it on here but it does feature here and there elsewhere on the web. The Loxley Independent Chapel was built in 1787 at the expense of one Rev Benjamin Greaves, the curate of the nearby village of Bradfield. Although completed for the most part it is assumed the financial resources of the Reverend and his friends must have fallen somewhat short as the builders failed to install window on the east side of the building. Owing to this fault the building could not be consecrated and was therefore sold at auction for £315 and brought into use as a Free Chapel. The first baptisms took place in 1799 and by 1851 a religious census showed an average afternoon congreation of over 200. In 1872 the first officer of HMS Titanic, Henry Tingle Wilde was baptised in the chapel. Despite amalgamation with a congregation from the United Reformed Church attendance continued to dwindle and the chapel finally closed in 1993. The building is now in private ownership (I think I'm right in saying the same bloke owns swathes of dilapidated buildings in the area) and although it is Grade II listed it was fallen ever further into disrepair since first being placed on English Heritage's buildings at risk register in 1985. The Pictures 1. A wonky external owing to the ridiculous shape of Sheffield in general: 2. The organ from the pews in the loft: 3. The pulpit, showing the pretty dire state of affairs on the ground floor: 4. An attempt to diversify on the cliche preaching shot: 5. Some of the marble memorials and related 'things' dotted about, the plaques are pristine, it's a strange contrast: 6. A good example of how an organ console shouldn't look: 7. What seemed to be a Nonconformist newspaper, riveting stuff. Cheers for looking, if you're in Sheffield and up for some explores then drop me an email or PM Thirteen.
  23. This one is thanks to Drinkinbud's mate who has a local pub and gave him the nod, he gave me a shout and off we went. This place has been a club, a munitions store a rollerskate rink, a cinema and a stable in it's 165 year history. It closed several years back, which seems odd to me seeing as it's position and condition would lead me to think it would be profitable. Up for Sale for £100,000 with £100,000 pa ground rent too, no wonder it hasn't been bought! Here's some pics! I'm sure I did this report once before.........hey if it's a duplicate, fine!
  24. Former Keighley College 6 Lord Street Keighley, West Yorkshire BD21 3DB http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2345327/World-War-Two-bomb-shelter-space-scores-people-college-car-park.html Gotta be worth a look ?
  25. Got a permission visit for this place that's being cleared out now, through the gf's mam as she knows I'm in to this sort of stuff. Willis & Bates dates back to the 1800s, moving to Halifax in the last few years of that century to take advantage of the engineering opportunities offered by the textile industry in the region. The current factory, named the Pellon Works, was built in Reservoir Road and was completed in 1900. Initially, the company made spun-metal parts for the textile industry but they soon diversified into making parts for other industries, particularly those of the gas and the rapidly developing electrical industries of the time. There is a possibility that one of the company's founders, Alfred Bates, was responsible for the design and manufacture of the military steel helmet, although this is unsubstantiated at present.At the end of World War I, Willis & Bates diversified further and became involved in the manufacture of parts for Petromax paraffin pressure lamps and lanterns. In 1925 they started making lamp and lantern parts for the Tilley company, a relationship which lasted until 1938 when Willis & Bates began manufacturing and selling lanterns on their own.The Vapalux pressure lamp bears a close resemblance with the Tilley lamp, in the way the burner works and how the mantle is attached. This is not surprising given that the company had previously manufactured parts for Tilley, although many improvements were incorporated such as a captive preheater torch. The earliest model, the E41, was characterised by having an internal gallery and a plain ventilator with separate slots for air intake and exhaust, very much in the Petromax style. Again, this is probably a reflection of the earlier production work that had been done for Petromax.Although this lantern took slightly longer to start, compared with some Petromax types made by Ehrich & Graetz which were equipped with rapid, blowlamp type preheaters, it burned for hours on end without needing attention, providing 300 cp (candle power) light output.The Vapalux pressure lamp got a real boost when the Second World War started, as it was then issued as standard to the British army. This boost was enormous, and Willis & Bates produced up to 2000 lamps and lanterns per week.In 1946, Willis & Bates began an association with Aladdin Industries of Greenford who marketed their output under the name 'Bialaddin' - thus the 'Vapalux' trade-name largely disappeared other than for some lanterns sold direct to the Army. Aladdin Industries of Greenford were also responsible for the development of the Bialaddin range of heater/radiators as well as the T10 and T20 table lamps, which rivalled the equivalent Tilley products of the time. In 1968, the association between Willis & Bates and Aladdin Industries of Greenford ended and Willis & Bates resumed the sale of their lanterns and the name 'Vapalux' re-emerged. Until 2010, Vapalux lanterns were being made at the Pellon Works in Halifax. Although in 1997, Willis & Bates ceased trading, another local company, Bairstow Brothers (1985) Limited bought the rights to make the lanterns. Vapalux (and Bialaddin lamps and lanterns), continue to deserve a reputation for being well-designed and engineered as well as being totally reliable in use.In early 2010, after the British army started to purchase battery lanterns instead and did not renew the contract, the Vapalux Brand and the tooling and IP rights for its manufacture were sold to a Korean Manufacturer for an undisclosed sum. All manufacturing will be transferred to the new owner and not continued in Great Britain. Visited it r lass
×