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UK St John the evangelist Church - December 2015.

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History :

 

St John's was built between 1890 and 1892 to a design by the Lancaster architects Paley, Austin and Paley. The estimated cost of the church was £6,800 but, because of problems with the foundations, its final cost, including the fittings, was nearer to £12,000 (£1,170,000 in 2015). It provided seating for 616 people.Financial donations towards the site and structure of the church were made by Thomas Brooks, 1st Baron Crawshaw of Crawshaw Hall. Because of diminishing numbers attending the church, and because of thefts of lead from the roof of the church, the congregation has decided to opt for the church to be declared redundant. The church was declared redundant on 20 February 2012.

 

Warning, pic heavy.

Outside

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Alter

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A few statues

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Nice curtains

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I've no idea what this is called

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Had a bit of fun inside..

 

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Finally.. 

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Liking that a lot, looks decent and the pics are good as well. Watermark is a bit overbearing for my liking but just my personal opinion :thumb 

 

:comp:

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Quality stuff that mate, really like those shots. The pics seem pretty high res so you could probably get away with going up a couple of image sizes to the largest "medium 600 x 800" or even Large mate :thumb

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