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Russia Magnesite mine, Jan 2016

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Hi mates!

I wasn't there for a long time. The beginniing of 2016 was really rich with explorations. And one of the places was a working magnesite mine in Chelyabinsk region.




I was there two times but this time we managed to reach the lowest horizont on minus 320 meters.










I had no tripod and my camera became misted so pics are not very good.










Transport descent.








Tubs without any railmotor car.










Abandoned part is full of water. On the right you can see a tube from which a lot of splashes release.






So that's all thanks for looking and have great time!:)


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      <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dc_8V5x3KDo" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>
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