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    • By Mumi
      Hi mates,
       
      few days ago mi brother and I visited a huge abandoned textile factory sorrounded by nature. Hope you enjoy!
       
       
    • By obscureserenity
      Campina Youth House
       
       
      Haven't seen this one posted anywhere so I decided to chuck a quick report up on it. I would say this particular location could be described as disused rather than abandoned, as it looked like there was redevelopment work going on when we arrived. Hence why it is so nice and pristine. Anyway, onto a little bit of history I found..
       
      History

      The Youth House was orginally built as a leisure centre in Campina. A city situated roughly around the South East of Romania. It was constructed by local authorites in order to create a space for young people to participate in a range of sporting activities such as: aerobics, matrial arts and boxing. It was also established in order to promote culture and education and the house provided various facilities for the arts. The Youth House hosted a large auditorium to  showcase fairs, exhibitions, conventions, concerts and festivals. 
       
       
      Visit

      Visited with @darbians and Gina on a long weekend trip to Romania. We were driving past and saw what we orginally thought was a hotel and decided to check it out. Finding this place was defintely an unsuspected susprise and I'm very glad we decided to pull over. I really enjoyed photographing this one and I espiecally liked the mosiacs which reminded me of the ones at Buzludzha I had seen the previous year. I hope you enjoy my report!
       
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
      When you find a window open on the top floor, gotta get a few photos from the roof 
       

       

       
       
      Thanks for reading!
       
    • By The Urban Collective
      A stunning grade two listed gem decaying right on the high street.
       
      Featuring the stunning architecture of Alfred Waterhouse who also designed Strangeways prison the Manchester town hall.
       
      The main building has been used for many different purposes over the years as well as Prudential themselves. And the basement club was once a Berni inns restaurant (Cafe Monico)
      a chain that served a post-war British public such delight's as sherry schooners steak and chips and black forest gateau as well as becoming a dance club in the 90's.
       
      We had a wonderful two hours in this grade two listed time capsule. Hope you guys enjoy the pics as much as we enjoyed the explore.
       
      Thanks for any feedback
       
      The Urban Collective
      We Film It...
       
       
       
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       


    • By Hooismans
      In this video we are exploring an abandoned asylum which opened in 1930 and closed in 1997.
       
      I hope you liked the video!
       
       
    • By a World in Ruins
      Visited on a freezing cold snowy Sunday morning with Scrappy NW and Katy. Long overdue visit this one but access isn't always possible. Inside its dark and decrepit yet enough remains to get an idea of how it looked when it was in full flow. The stage area was a no go as it has now collapsed. Structuraly it was fairly sound even in the upper areas. Things were made to last in 1894 obviously.
      Theatres have so much history and are always wonderful places to explore and photograph even if  their condition is so poor. On with some history.
       
      I'm sure you have all read the history of this pace in other reports but i'll put a brief summary here:
       
      The Burnley Empire Theatre has a profoundly poignant history that starts in the 19th Century when it was first designed by GB Rawcliffe in 1894. Owned and managed by WC Horner, it was a theatre of high regard and continued to such following works in 1911, when the auditorium was redesigned by Bertie Crewe, well respected architect, much of whose work is no longer standing – pulled down to make way for housing, shops or other amenities, or victims of the war that destroyed so many beautiful buildings.
      The interior boasts ‘two slightly curved wide and deep balconies, terminating in superimposed stage boxes framed between massive Corinthian columns supporting a deep cornice. Segmental-arched proscenium, with richly decorated spandrels and heraldic cartouche. Side walls feature plaster panels, pilasters and drops. Flat, panelled ceiling with circular centre panel and central sun burner. Restrained heraldic and Greek plasterwork on balcony and box fronts’ .
      The Theatre opened on Monday the 29th of October 1894 with a variety show and could originally seat 1,935 people.
      During its time as a theatrical venue, Charlie Chaplin, Margot Fonteyn and Gracie Fields are just a few of the names to have appeared on the now broken stage.
       
      In 1938 The Theatre was converted for cinema use by the Architects Lewis and Company of Liverpool, and the seating capacity was reduced to 1,808 in the process.
      Like so many other Theatres around the Country the Empire was eventually converted for Bingo use in 1970 but even this ceased in 1995 and the Theatre, despite being a Grade II Listed building, has been empty ever since and is in serious decline, and listed as one of the Theatres Trust's buildings at risk.
       
      On with the pics
       
       
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

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