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UK Hoy Trinity Church, Peak Dale - February 2016

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The Explore

As we were in Buxton and looking around for the incredible blue waters by the quarry in Peak Dale for landscape shots we thought we'd have a look at this little church. Not much left inside now but not too bad 

 

The History

This Place of Worship was founded in 1886. Peak Dale acquired a measure of importance with the coming of the railway. Here was the Peak Forest station of the London, Midland and Scottish railway, a branch off the Bakewell to Buxton line which travelled north to Chapel en le Frith. As befitting its importance, it has (or had) 3 places of worship. The church was built in 1886, and Wesleyan Methodist (at Great Rocks) and Primitive Methodist chapels (at Upper End) built in 1885 and 1887 respectively.

 

The parish church cost £1,500 to build - of stone, in the "modern Gothic Style, consisting of a chancel and nave, and an unfinished western tower, containing one bell; an organ was provided in 1902, and there are sittings for 200 persons. In 1890 a burial ground of half an acre, granted by F.W. BAGSHAWE, esq. was consecrated by the Bishop of Southwell."Recent information is however that it has been declared unsafe, and it is now (2010) closed.

 

 

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