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ACID-REFLUX

UK Edlington / Conisbrough Tunnel

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Not a great deal of History is available for this tunnel/culvert which runs from the Edlington & Warmsworth area to the outskirts of Conisbrough. The line was supposedly build to transport water from the Thrybergh Reservoir, through Denaby & Conibrough to Edlington and maybe through to Doncaster. Obviously this report is just concerning the "Known" Culverted section.

 

The first time it appeared on a map was in 1892. The tunnel runs for approximately 1290 yds ? (although it seems much longer as you progress along it) has 4 air-shafts (which are all visible) and consists of different methods of construction. Some sections are your typical Red Brick formed arch sections whereas other have been driven straight through the limestone deposits that frequent the local area which have no man made supports at all.  Other sections have obviously been constructed via the "Cut & Cover" standard tunnel technique and the brick support walls have a 3/4" rusting steel cover plate with the spoil back-filled onto it. 

 

The Cast iron water pipe that runs through the tunnel is approximately 2FT in diameter and made of around 10Ft lengths. Around 2/3rds of the original pipeline remains following some it obviously vanishing along with any steel fittings  Access is very restricted too those of a certain disposition  which makes you wonder how the heavy cast pipes were removed.....bloody strong metal Fairies in Yorkshire 

 

The tunnel varies considerably in both height & width throughout it"s length, going from crawl only sections through to 5x3ft sections to vast areas about 4ft wide and 6ft high . in other words you "will" bang your head  & your camera gear repeatedly. I"ve shot UWA so it looks bigger than it actually is, if you suffer from claustrophobia id suggest you keep away.

 

Surprisingly it"s in very good structural condition for it"s age (unlike me) apart from the infilled section around the air shafts & the odd subsidence type blowing of some walls. Although it does make you wonder about Farmer Giles driving over your head in his big heavy tractor as you shuffle under the plated sections :)

 

Obviously due to the construction methods & materials it creates issues correctly lighting it up, hopefully i"ve done it justice 

 

As always, thanks for having a look & comments are always appreciated .......don"t be shy :) 

 

 

 

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Edited by ACID-REFLUX

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1 hour ago, MrT said:

Nice, looks a bit tight ;)

 

Cheers mate :) 

 

It is very much, although it does not look like it. That"s wide angles for ya 

Edited by ACID-REFLUX

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Remembered your password then :D Wouldn't mind having a look at that but I cant help but think you've made it look better than it actually is! 

 

:comp: 

 

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Thank you for reminding me about this! i spent ages looking for it about a year ago but i thought it had been sealed up with concrete.

 

I like the way the tunnel interchanges between brick and rock, i may have to nip over and have a look at this.

 

Good photos as always mate :thumb

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On 2/27/2016 at 11:20 PM, Lenston said:

Very nice mate, enjoy the day tomorrow ;)

 

Cheers mate :)

As for Sunday it was certainly different, for all the wrong reasons lol

On 2/28/2016 at 4:58 PM, -Raz- said:

Remembered your password then :D Wouldn't mind having a look at that but I cant help but think you've made it look better than it actually is! 

 

:comp: 

 

 Well you never know mate, i have been known too make stuff look better before lol

 

My PC remembers my password but i still don"t have a clue what it is :)

23 hours ago, coolboyslim said:

Looks great but deffo not for a fat twat like me. Lmfao. Hope your day went OK today also m8ty. Anyway thx for post and pics damn cool.

Cheers matey :)

I was thinking the same for me when i got wedged between the landfill & the roof after leaving my camera bag on lol 

8 hours ago, Hydro3xploric said:

Thank you for reminding me about this! i spent ages looking for it about a year ago but i thought it had been sealed up with concrete.

 

I like the way the tunnel interchanges between brick and rock, i may have to nip over and have a look at this.

 

Good photos as always mate :thumb

 

 Thanks for the kind words mate :)

 

I"d checked it out previously and it was sealed and the view down the newly grated air shaft gave the impression that they were filled in above the tunnel. Which too be fair is nearly the case :)

 

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