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MrT

UK Old Nic Theatre Gainsborough March 2016

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Had chance to visit this place with permission so living down the road i thought it was worth popping in. The Old Nick was the original police station in Gainsborough. It is an Italianate-style Grade II building at the junction of Spring Gardens and Cross Street - just above the vehicular access to Marshall's Yard. Back in 1859 land on this site was sold to build a Magistrates' Court and Police Station. These buildings served their purpose until 1972 when the new police station on Morton Terrace was built followed by the new Magistrates' Court on Church Street in 1978. The court room is now the main theatre, still can see the main structure but they were practising for a show so no great photos, again with the judges rest room, its the costume room. 

 

Down stairs though, pretty untouched are the cells, interview room, doctors room, check in desk and exercise yard.

 

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Few other bits and bobs to see, this is it really. If you close by and get the chance its worth it. Another local one im glad to get off the list anyways :thumb

Edited by MrT

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Some top notch pics there! Great to see how unchanged it is and the names etched into the paint really makes you ponder about the folk that have come and gone there :thumb 

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Always nice to see inside places like this, some real history right there. Nicely captured mate :thumb 

I like the tiny excercise yard and the scrawls on the cell door. Lovely original features inside too :)

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2 hours ago, Hydro3xploric said:

Looks pretty nice in there mate, good shots as always :thumb

 

Not a bad little local place to tick off the list, thanks dude :-D

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