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Urbexbandoned

UK Canwick Cemetery Chapel, West Side - Lincolnshire - March 2016

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History

 

Pair of former chapels, now disused. 1856. By Michael Drury. Coursed and squared rubble with ashlar dressings and plain
tile roof. Gothic Revival style with pointed arched windows and Geometrical tracery.
EXTERIOR: chamfered and moulded plinth, sill band, moulded eaves, coped gables with crosses and finials.
North side has a central gable with an archway and shafts, flanked by single gabled buttresses. Beyond, single blocked
3-light windows.
To left, the octagonal east chapel has angle buttresses and 3 gables, each with a 4-light window. Roof gablets. Fleche
removed.
To right, west chapel with apsidal end and buttresses, 3 bays, with six 2-light windows with hoodmoulds. In the north gable,
a 5-light window.
Square north-west tower, 3 stages, has to north a gabled doorway with shafts. Above, a trefoiled vescia piscis and to
east, a 2-light window. Third stage has a foiled corbel table and to north, a rose window. On the other sides, 3-light
windows. Spire removed.
INTERIOR: east chapel has an arch braced conical roof with collars forming a corona. West chapel has a moulded stone arch
to the apse, and an arch braced double purlin roof. Both chapels have foliage corbels.           

 

The Explore 

 

This was the first explore out with my new camera and i'm pretty chuffed with the pics. I really can't take any credit at all for this,  @hamtagger, has been watching this place for probably the best part of 2 years. I would have known nothing about it otherwise. We were on an evening walk through the cemetery (being interested in the dead and all, this is how we roll) when we noticed that the door was slightly ajar. Outside the door there are a few beer cans which at a guess gave me the impression that a drunk had tried getting in. Not equipped with our camera's and with light not being on our side we decided to come back another day. After a few days we found ourselves in there one afternoon. Not knowing what to expect really, we knew that the place had been closed for a long time and judging by the quantity of pigeon shit even behind the door which had built up in to a mound having been recently opened it was longer than we thought. This should have been called the Pigeon Palace. What a lovely little place for these flying rats to nest. 

Only the West side is accessible, going in through the door it has a lovely porch area. To the left was a small room, teracotta and black diamond floor made from Clay tiles, 2 windows and a small fire looking thing in the corner.

On the right as you go in there is another door which leads to the tower. Unfortunately no way you can get up with the rotting stairs and platfforms above. The spire had been removed leading to a lot of water ingress.

The main Chapel was relatively pretty, decorated at the edges where the concrete arches were with foliage made from stone. The Pews were nicely crafted too. The altar still remains but very bare. Allthough it very much had the feeling of a church there was very little to make clear that it was infact a church other than those things we would recognise as being in one. There were no plaques on the wall, inside or out. No scriptures, nothing. I really enjoyed it, despite the pigeon cemetery and faeces inside. Some really nice woodwork on the window frames on the exterior of the East side, I have googled and nothing has come up. It looks like a crocodile/Alligator/Lizard??

 

Anyway, on with the pics and thanks for looking!

1

 

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2

 

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3

 

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4

 

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5

 

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6, The Pews had suffered from woodworm, sadly.

 

25380984774_e7690c71ec_b.jpg

 

7

 

25384952123_1e6d44ee92_b.jpg

 

8, The remains of the tower

 

25384957353_caeab14423_b.jpg

 

9

 

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10

 

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11

 

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12

 

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13

 

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14

 

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15

 

25892986622_72c03f1a51_b.jpg

 

 

 

 

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1 minute ago, Vulex said:

Nice little church fella. I wonder why there was so much wood chopped?

 

Thanks mate, although the last time I looked I had breasts and not a penis hahaha. :grin2: It's not the first time ;)

No idea, I think maybe it was being used for storage at some point as the actual Mortuary chapel in the grounds is being used for the groundsman.

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1 minute ago, Urbexbandoned said:

 

Thanks mate, although the last time I looked I had breasts and not a penis hahaha. :grin2: It's not the first time ;)

No idea, I think maybe it was being used for storage at some point as the actual Mortuary chapel in the grounds is being used for the groundsman.

LMAO well in that case.... i'll give you any location you want ;););) 

i mean Nice little chuch lady * hah.

 

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4 minutes ago, hamtagger said:

Nice to see inside finally wasn't it! Love those detail shots of the cobwebs and the Lizard/giraffe thing outside :)

 

:comp: 

Yes very much so, thank you :)

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I noticed on another forum that as soon as it was noted that the poster was a female, people were falling over themselves to offer help and advice. I nearly catfished a random woman pic off google when I first started, before I found this forum.

Edited by Vulex

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4 minutes ago, Vulex said:

I noticed on another forum that as soon as it was noted that the poster was a female, people were falling over themselves to offer help and advice. I nearly catfished a random woman pic off google when I first started, before I found this forum.

I have seen that happen a lot, it's called desperation haha. I usually let people think it for a little while before pointing it out, that leads to real awkwardness lol

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Cool report. Corr that's some pigeon poop porn right there in shot 9! Btw cans at the door usually means I've been in there......and as for @Vulex's comment.... 

 

0c0691802d8219acf8ccf0a4c82d3c31f4dbcc90

 

:D 

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Interesting, myself and my mate checked this place out when we stumbled across it by accident on our way to Nocton Hall last year but found no access, great to finally see what it was like inside.

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