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Lavino

UK Abc cinema Liverpool March 2016

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Abc cinema

visited with @blacksnake @fragglehunter @tbolt and @wherever I may roam enjoyed this cinema was very dark here and hard to light. So here's a few photo and some history...

The ABC Cinema is Grade II listed. It rounds the corner of Lime Street and Elliot Street and is one of the first buildings visitors see when leaving Leaving Lime Street Station. ABC acquired the building in 1930 and it opened a year later to become known as one of the finest cinemas of that era.

The six storey exterior was designed by A. E. Shannon and has very little decoration other than motifs over the entrance. Despite this, the building remains a very distinct feature on Lime Street. The building is listed for the grand interior, which is said to remain one of the designers - William R. Glen's - best. 

The cinema was renamed ABC Cinema in February 1971 and survived intact until 1982 when it was converted to three screens; the additional two mini cinemas were installed under the balcony. It was re-named Cannon in 1986 and remained so until closure in 1998. A building that many in the city remember using, The Forum finally closed its doors on the 28th of January 1998. It remains unused.    

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Heard it was open, i guess many people did with the tour bus that turned up this morning, some nice shots to be had in there :thumb 

 

:comp:

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Whoever put the downstairs lights on would have set the alarm off; Pir was wired to the electric box!. There were already so many lights on in there that the workmen had left on still cant quite fathom why you would mess with it, I mean you already had enough light in there to photograph, Spoilt compared to other cinemas which are pitch black barely any chance to focus! :P

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It is a nice cinema this. I could tell it was part of the ABC chain as the decoration is identical to a closed cinema near me. 

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It wasn't us that were messing with the lights. They all went out in complete darkness then when they came back on the alarms went off.

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14 hours ago, Lavino said:

It wasn't us that were messing with the lights. They all went out in complete darkness then when they came back on the alarms went off.

 

One infamous case when I was messing about with a fuseboard in a derelict cinema (funny enough) I was inadvertently switching the lit up sign out the front on and off. :-D 

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