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Other Patarei Prison permission visit July 2015

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I haven't been here for a while, sorry for that. I will try to catch up with you!


I have visit The Patarei Prison in Estonia last summer. For the amount of €2 you can undertake a self-guided ‘urban exploration’ tour. This prison has a long history and I tried to find some info about it, but there's not much to find. It's even not on wikipedia.
I only knew that it used to be a really bad prison. This site will give you the most detailed information about this fortress. http://www.academia.edu/3767226/Patarei_Prison_Tallinn_problematic_built_heritage_and_dark_tourism
It's a big complex and I don't think I have seen everything. There are no signs, so I didn't know in what kind of room I was. Now I figured out that one room was "the hanging room". Pretty creepy to know that I was there. 
I hope you enjoy my set. I'm still working on some photos, there was just so much too see!

 

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#7
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#8
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Wow that looks like a really interesting place to look around. That medical room is amazing.

 

:comp: 

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13 hours ago, Andy said:

Great place. Worth to use the opportunity of a permission visit.


Yeah it's definitely worth it. I would do it again if I had the change and come on what is €2 the spend al whole day in Prison :-P

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Wow what an amazing place and photos :D This will be featured as one of our favourite reports on the facebook page next week :thumb 

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3 hours ago, The_Raw said:

Wow what an amazing place and photos :D This will be featured as one of our favourite reports on the facebook page next week :thumb 

 

Ow what a suprise!! Tnx :D

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Stunning report for sure, all for €2 money well spent I'd say :lol: 

Was wondering if the hanging room is in this collection - just my morbid curiosity!

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3 minutes ago, jones-y-gog said:

Stunning report for sure, all for €2 money well spent I'd say :lol: 

Was wondering if the hanging room is in this collection - just my morbid curiosity!

 

Tnx. Jup it's number 7 :-P

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