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France H15 Prison - April 2016

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The Explore

This place has been top of my list of places I'd wanted to see ever since I started this hobby. Glad to have finally seen but it was a very strange place to visit, combination of the horror stories about the gypsy camp outside and the general feel of being in a prison made it a real weird one but enjoyed it none the less.

 

The place has been thoroughly trashed over the years but for some reason it kind of added to the feel of the place for me, kind of looked like a riot had broken out and all the inmates had escaped :)

 

The History

Prison H15 is an abandoned prison in France. Built using sandstone and brick, the prison could house almost 1500 inmates. The site has an interesting and varied history.

A Cistercian monastery was built in the early 1200's on the site on which the prison now stands. During the French revolution the building was nationalised and the monks were expelled. The site has been used a prison since the beginning of the nineteenth century.

Huge expansion of the site was planned for 1812, to convert the monastery into a workhouse for the poor and infirm. There were many delays and work did not begin until 1817, designed to accommodate 400 individuals of both sexes, and divided into four separate sections. At the time there was a lack of prisons in the area and sentences were being cut short due to overcrowding. Shortly after construction of the workhouse had commenced, the Interior Minister ordered the work be stopped, and a detention centre be built instead.

The plans were amended and construction of the central house resumed until 1822 when the first prisoners were received. The building could house up to 500 prisoners, one half reserved for corrections and the other half for criminals.

Refurbishment works took place alongside the construction of further dormitories, increasing the prisons population to 965 men and 532 women. A further prison was built on adjoining land to house female prisons and the original was used as a male-only prison from then onwards.

Facing a change in penitentiary systems the prison closed in 2011. The site has since seen a rapid demise as decay starts to set in and the buildings have been raided for scrap.
 

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Interesting to read and learn about the history - thanks for the report.

Its a must do place if anyone has the chance to go! There are reports of new sections becoming accessible lately, will be interesting to see how it pans out...

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Nice shots mate, was always high on my list as well.

 

On ‎02‎/‎05‎/‎2016 at 2:01 PM, jones-y-gog said:

Interesting to read and learn about the history - thanks for the report.

Its a must do place if anyone has the chance to go! There are reports of new sections becoming accessible lately, will be interesting to see how it pans out...

 

Tell me more please...... The women's wing?? The entrance was still well sealed when we went a couple of weeks ago but people had knocked through the wall in a couple of places, those are also well sealed up now :( 

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On ‎05‎/‎05‎/‎2016 at 1:17 PM, The_Raw said:

Nice shots mate, was always high on my list as well.

 

 

Tell me more please...... The women's wing?? The entrance was still well sealed when we went a couple of weeks ago but people had knocked through the wall in a couple of places, those are also well sealed up now :( 

Something I saw on FB mate about an underground section. Maybe they were just bigging themselves up as I didn't see anything different come to think of it.

The women's section seems to be much less accessible than the main bit, which I thought was pretty much open 24/7

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9 hours ago, jones-y-gog said:

Something I saw on FB mate about an underground section. Maybe they were just bigging themselves up as I didn't see anything different come to think of it.

The women's section seems to be much less accessible than the main bit, which I thought was pretty much open 24/7

 

Yeah it's a total walk in, the women's section however (the far nicer bit from what 've seen) still sits behind high prison walls. Next time might give it a go....

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Best pics I seen from here...anyone planning on going here,I would love to tag along or even meet you there..dont fancy a solo trip with those immies camped out front

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Looks more and more tagged overtime it crops up. Good to see your take on the place, very photogenic in areas :) 

 

Interesting to hear the possibility of other bits being open too...

 

:comp: 

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