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cgeff

France Hopital des Biches

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On 13/05/2016 at 5:31 PM, The_Raw said:

Hospital of Bitches, I like it :D 

No Bitches but only Biches :-)

 

On 13/05/2016 at 0:08 AM, Urbexbandoned said:

Sounds like my kinda place ;) 

Really nice shots, your detailed ones are great :thumb 

This area is quite empty but there is some pictures to take

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