Jump to content
Merryprankster

UK Tansley wood mills - Lumsdale valley - june 2016

Recommended Posts

first report in a while, been busy in france :-D + havent seen anything from this place so thought id share it. It was one of those lucky stumble upon by accident explores, which are always nice, certainly not epic to look at but its nice knowing every corner you walk round is going to be something new that you wont have seen it on someone elses report already. I was actually in the area looking for waterfalls to go and have a jungle shower as we'd been camping up the road, zigged when i should have zagged and came across this.

couldnt find much history apart from the local rag circa feb 09 and little from historic england

historic england-
HISTORY: 
Tansley Wood Mill is a substantially complete example of a late C18, first generation water- powered textile factory, whose form is strongly influenced by, and is a near-contemporary of Sir Richard Arkwright's pioneering cotton spinning factory at nearby Cromford. The site retains clear evidence of phased development, and of the enhancement of its water power-producing capacity, 

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1389284


local rag

Plans to convert a former Tansley textile mill into flats and offices have been given the go-ahead.

Council chiefs gave the green light to a major redevelopment of Tansley Wood Mills, in Lower Lumsdale, on Tuesday.

The historic woodland building is to be restored and redeveloped after officers said the scheme would regenerate what was formerly an important employment site.

Plans, submitted by applicant Paddock Motors, include converting the Grade II-listed mill into flats, turning the old forge building into a restaurant, four craft studios, office space and commercial units.

Planning co-ordinator for the scheme, Bill Clay, said: "It is an exceptional attractive and special location in this historical wooded valley.

"It is a wonderful environment to be working in, particually as we are local people. What we are doing is finding a new use for an important historical building and ensuring it has a future.

"It is also a very important employment site, historically, and we want to take it into the future in terms of returning it to an employment site."

District council planning officers said the site would benefit nature conservation, landscape restoration and secure the future of a listed building. A previous bid to develop the building was rejected by the Secretary of State in 2005, saying it could be detrimental to the character and appearance of the area.


Read more: http://www.matlockmercury.co.uk/news/local/tansley-mill-s-conversion-plan-is-approved-1-871469#ixzz4BCYQORUw


picturegraphs
 

27512131561_86a541bc81_b.jpg
 

27512145851_8e96af0243_b.jpg

 

27486039782_9a772b55b3_b.jpg

 

27550712706_c2c11260e8_b.jpg

 

27486069992_4400ac0e56_b.jpg

 

27584971185_66424b46f4_b.jpg

 

26976163983_907b65b9fe_b.jpg

 

27486049992_ae3d6a1f00_b.jpg

 

26974969234_06d1d1d2a5_b.jpg

 

27550634576_9dd634461c_b.jpg

 

27512102691_413f7762f1_b.jpg

 

27550646356_9f39b972e4_b.jpg

 

27512115841_ec569cdc0d_b.jpg

 

27584907345_54ab17783f_b.jpg

 

27550613666_75bd269788_b.jpg

 

27512057871_e69836daa2_b.jpg

 

26976094493_37474cd37e_b.jpg

 

27584896635_c7048bbc66_b.jpg

IF anyone  knows what the flying fuck this is can you let me know :P

27512072291_380f3fb815_b.jpg

 

26976085353_97b9c686b9_b.jpg

 

26976070333_901b4f7bf0_b.jpg

 

26976044823_f66e107bc3_b.jpg

 

27307895100_d1c7b42412_b.jpg

 

27550585786_4e6b5e0b60_b.jpg

 

27512032341_5bab162ceb_b.jpg

 

27551231016_b1e5b9b513_b.jpg

 

26975574844_32c29dcb80_b.jpg


and lets not forget the real reason i was in thee valley :P

 

27551242016_10d1f39c94_b.jpg


thanks for looking kids, happy explorin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Similar Content

    • By little_boy_explores
      Dawson fabrics ltd


      The history

      Built in 1770 by William Marsden who's daughter married Richard Field who then traded there for a number of years until forming the partnership of Field & Bottrill in the 1880's. Now Dawson Fabrics Ltd. The company name Dawson Fabrics closed the doors at Greenside Mill sometime in the late millennium years with the loss of 70 jobs. Administrators from Leicestershire insolvency were called and are now handling the company affairs. The company was said to be doing well with orders from high street stores such as Marks & Spencer. Dawson Fabrics were making fleecing for jackets and blankets. The company closed it's premises on Wakefield Rd in 2000 with a loss of 60+ jobs to focus on their other sites including Greenside Mill. Outline planning for 149 houses have been submitted with
      a demolition order which was denied but as recentley been re-subbmitted with agreed amendments.

      The explore

      This has taken some documenting. We have had everything from Alarms to some very sketchy Security (with authentic teeth missing)... chased around the Mill by guard dogs and the local mechanic filming us through one of the Mill's windows then giving chase up the driveway. But paying frequent visits we are now confident we have documented every part of the Mill. Starting in early 2013 we decided to take a look. Having been denied the first time we were persistent and on returning a further 6/7 times managed to start with some of the Mills out buildings. 


      The repair workshop

      Typical tools left over which would have been used to repair various pieces of equipment in order to keep the Mill running... we were surprised to see so many of the original materials left behind perhaps not dissimilar to the day it closed albeit with a little more rust. I suppose when your out on an explore like this you know you've hit the jackpot when theres machinery of this nature untouched from vandals or travellers. 
       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      The roof

      Offers reprieve when Charlie the guard dog is on the rampage..
       

       

       

       
      The boiler house

      One of the tricker out buildings to reach which took some careful manoeuvring to enter... The boiler house was a considerable size and housed some pretty impressive pieces of metal. There were quite a few boilers scattered around and we did mange to document a very old looking although perfectly immaculate Ruston & Hornsby boiler... which if we had the time to persevere with the controls would have provided some much needed warmth on the explore. 
       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Climbing the boiler
       


       

       

       
      The main factory

      Block A

      This building forms most of the internal workings of the Mill with huge generators lining the corridor. on previous explores we would have been more than happy with this has the main attraction... It was a little like looking around a museum and we wouldn't have been surprised if a guide had popped out and started talking about how the machinery was used to produce some of the garments. It was one of those buildings that if you had more time you could easily spend hours working out what pieces of equipment do what... maybe a guide wouldn't have been so bad. 
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Block B

      What we thought was the processing area turned out to be a little more interesting... on entering there was typical garments stored in corridors.. filing cabinets etc. Making our way around we came to what appeared to be a Lab most probably used to test out dye's for the Mill's fabric. There was some wonderful looking pieces of apparatus that wouldn't look out of place on the starship enterprise. we were so tempted to start them up but again time was against us... In the basement we came across a kitchen area which was a little unusual as the main canteen area was in a different location of the site. 
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Block C

      Separate from the main Mill apart from the adjoining conveyer belt is the substantial finishing area... where guessing that this is where production was finished with garments ready to pack for distribution. standard apparatus consisted of looms ... drums filled with dye ... retro looking PC's and a general supervisors office. natural decay slowly taking over the various leftovers. 
       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Supervisors office block C
       

       

       

       
      The admin office

      Beautifully presented and part of the Mills original build was this very well preserved admin block... we felt like we had stepped back into the 1950's with this one all that was missing was a typewriter with someone busy working away whilst smoking an old pipe. Original oak wood entry which expanded to the stairs and the facade. Searching further we came across what looked like a board room i suppose some important decisions will have been made hear over the years and most recently the current owners rubbing their hands in what potentially will make them millions if plans are approved for the demolishment of the site to make way for a housing estate. 
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      We've had it all with this explore... a beautiful preserved Mill dating way back. some very heart thumping games of hide and seek... very loud alarms... and a lovely guard dog barking incessantly whilst on site... we even got embroiled with the RSPCA and locals concerned about the health and safety of the guard dog. we're a little reluctant to put this out as the identity of the Mill will probably be compromised... I think though the old girls years are numbered and it won't be long before another part of our history is noted in text form whilst making way for another faceless housing estate. 


      That concludes the explore...
    • By Britain's Decays
      Last year we tried to get in Scarborough sports centre but they have seriously locked that place up tight, nothing on the roof, no tunnels or anything.So we just made a short video of the outside. Today I went back with the newest member of our URBEX team, the drone and got some higher up shots. Here are the photos from the drone...
       
       





    • By SILVERSKULL2004
      Explore
       
      This was a fairly easy explore as these buildings are not as protected as the main college and the park relies on tourists to inform security about any vandals.
      The gymnasium was the hardest to get into as we had to avoid getting seen by any onlookers. So going at a later time of day would be advised.
      You should be cautious if you get further into the student centre as some of the doors looked to be alarmed.
      The classrooms are in the open and not surrounded by anything so you are likely to be spotted by security or tourists.
      We had a run in with security who were quite well mannered and laid back. All they said was that we were not to go near the building as it is a demolition site. 
      Explored with @little_boy_explores
       
      History
       
       
      Student Centre
       

       

      I can't believe they left this in the open
       

       

       

       

       
      Gymnasium
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

      We didn't need to this door
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
       
      Classrooms
       

       

       

       

       

       


       







    • By UrbanLurking
      Glen Parva was constructed on the site of the former Glen Parva Barracks in the early 1970s as a borstal and has always held young offenders. Since its opening in 1974 the establishment has seen considerable expansion and change and now serves a catchment area of over 100 courts, holding a mixture of sentenced, unsentenced, and remand prisoners.
      In 1997, Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Prisons walked out of an inspection at Glen Parva because conditions were so bad. After a subsequent inspection a year later, the report stated that there was "hope for the future" for the prison but added that a lot of work still needed to be done, and recommended that some staff should be moved because of their attitude towards inmates.
       
       
      Our  Explore: 
      Late night mission to this place made the entry a slight more easy then in the daylight, secca made this explore a lot more challenging haha! but a shame it had to be in the dark and access to most of the rooms made me see only a slight percentage of this place.  but i seen what i wanted to thankfully! And cheers to the lot that helped! 
       
       
      Enjoy the pics the few of them the rest are for the  archives 





×