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UK Hulme hippodrome June 2016

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wanted to visit the hippodrome for a long time now since I first ever seen pictures from there with all the colourful features. Had heard that it's used as a local church or parts of it are. So decided it was time to try our luck a visit was arranged with @Dangle_Angle and off we went. Didn't get long there and only photos from the stage area. But there is more to see so hopefully a return visit is in the pipeline. So here's a few I got on the day and some history..

 

History

 

The Hulme Hippodrome, originally known as the Grand Junction Theatre and Floral Hall, opened in Hulme, Manchester, on 7 October 1901. It and the nearby Playhouse Theatre, built at the same time, were part of the theatrical empire of W. H. Broadhead. The two venues were connected by an arcade, at the centre of which was Broadhead's company headquarters.

Initially the theatre staged mainly dramatic productions, while the original Hippodrome presented variety performances, but in 1905 the names and functions of the theatres were interchanged: the Hippodrome became the Grand Junction, and the variety performances were transferred to the new Hippodrome.

The Hippodrome was last used as a theatre in the 1960s; from the mid-1970s until its closure in 1986 it was used as a bingo hall. Since then most of the building has remained empty, and it has been placed on Manchester City Council's Buildings at Risk Register.

The building was bought by Gilbert Deya Ministries in 1999, and they hold services in part of the ground floor, led by pastor John Ezedom.

 

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Fascinating place, very colorful.
Looks a little bit like my hair colors 6 years ago. :D

 

andy-feb-2010.jpg

 

 

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