Jump to content

Recommended Posts

History

While records are relatively vague, it is reported that St. Anne’s school was constructed sometime in the 1800s. The school is likely to have been constructed during England’s Industrial Revolution as Bishop Auckland became a large mining town following the arrival of the railway to the area. The railways meant coal could be transported to the coast and shipped abroad much more easily; however, more miners were obviously required to meet the growing demand for the fossil fuel. Subsequently, the population in Bishop Auckland increased rapidly; the population increased from 1861 in 1801 to 10,000 in 1891, and to 16,000 by the turn of the twentieth century, and more facilities such as schools were suddenly required. 

It is well known that the town’s history surrounds its links with the Bishops of Durham, and despite causing controversy with the local aristocracy, a number of them were keen advocates for improving education for the poor, to improve their social, financial and moral circumstances. As with any powerful authority, the influence of the Bishops and their attitudes towards education continued long after they were stripped of their power in 1836, meaning the area remained a great centre for Christianity (on account of the Saints the region produced), learning and arts. To emphasise why their influence, ethics and morals lingered long after they were gone, for most of their reign the Bishops of Durham were given power equal to that of the King of England. In other words, they could hold their own parliament, raise armies, appoint their own sheriffs and Justices, administer laws, levy taxes, issue charters, collect revenue from mines, salvage shipwrecks, administer the forests and mint their own coins.

Unfortunately, the early years of the twentieth century brought a decline in the area’s booming industry, as coal reserves were starting to become exhausted. Colliery employment had halved by the 1920s, and, equally, the railways which supported the mining industry were also cut back as fewer were needed to transport coal. With lower employment opportunities, the once prosperous town faced a declining population, resulting in the closure of schools, businesses and other facilities. While St. Anne’s survived throughout most of the 1900s, the school was eventually sold and became Durham County Council’s Education Offices. The offices were moved in 2010, and since then they have been left to deteriorate. Plans to demolish the site, to make way for a housing project, were revealed in 2015. Despite the vandalism, anti-social behaviour and rats the derelict building has attracted, many locals have opposed the decision to bulldoze the former school, stating that the buildings are of an innovative architectural design. 

Our Version of Events

Realising that we’ve been focused on a lot of underground and train related stuff recently, we decided it would be good to spice things up a bit and have a look inside a few local ‘derps’. One of these was St. Anne’s school which has been on our doorstep for years. As with all buildings that look completely trashed, it’s easy to set them aside and cast them off as being empty and shit, but as we’ve found out many times in the past, sometimes you can be surprised by what you find inside. Unfortunately, though, St. Anne’s school wasn’t one of those buildings; instead, it turned out to be completely stripped, to the extent that there’s virtually nothing inside.

Access to the building wasn’t particularly difficult, as anyone who’s stood outside will notice, and after a quick scout around the outside we soon found ourselves inside – free to roam the old corridors and classrooms. As noted above, the building has deteriorated badly, so we had to watch our footing here and there. For the most part, however, the building is easy to navigate. On the whole, we were incredibly disappointed to find that there’s nothing left inside, but we did try to take advantage of how photogenic some of the decay that’s managed to spread throughout the building. It only took around twenty minutes to cover the entire site, but we were glad we took the time to visit a fine looking building that’s been completely ignored for too long. 

Like the entry, exiting the building was a smooth affair. We managed to get out again without attracting much attention (we think), and decided to have a walk down to the local shop to grab a bite to eat. Exploring is hungry work after all, and, as the Shreddies advert taught us many years ago, it’s important to keep hunger locked up till lunch. On the way, however, we encountered a few of the locals as they flew past in their chavved up automobile. In typical Bishop Auckland style, they decided to lob a chicken nugget out of the window, presumably in the hope that it might hit one of us… Well, we just thought we’d let those local goons, who were most likely the result of some chemical spillage that occurred in the area in the late 1980s, know that you missed.

Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do and Box. 
 

1:

 

aDSC_0642_zpseflrx31e.jpg

 

2:

 

aDSC_0640_zps0gy8zmkp.jpg

 

3:

 

aDSC_0626_zpsyudzth79.jpg

 

4:

 

aDSC_0628_zps5etiviqg.jpg

 

5:

 

aDSC_0632_zpsu4nqsyov.jpg

 

6:

 

aDSC_0548_zpsztjqjd1i.jpg

 

7:

 

aDSC_0551_zpsqjzx9pji.jpg

 

8:

 

aDSC_0556-2_zpsaufknrr2.jpg

 

9:

 

aDSC_0558_zpswg06wv9i.jpg

 

10:

 

aDSC_0559_zpstewbgnu2.jpg

 

11:

 

aDSC_0564_zpsiplinrz6.jpg

 

12:

 

aDSC_1138_zpsqw9mhzrm.jpg

 

13:

 

aDSC_0598_zps7e9pg3dz.jpg

 

14:

 

aDSC_0612_zps0qpjiowo.jpg

 

15:

 

aDSC_1132_zpsfhusu4ox.jpg

 

16:

 

aDSC_1140_zpszfyzpedg.jpg

 

17:

 

aDSC_1167_zpsaivttqka.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love how 'school meals' is written in picture 7. Some nice other bits of signage too. Schools aren't built like this any more, would have been lovely in its day :) 

nice pics, :thumb 

 

:comp:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Similar Content

    • By -Raz-
      After finding ourselves in a live swimming baths in Birmingham we had a short trip to West Brom to have a look at this place which from the outside doesn't look too big but once inside its huge, loads of interesting stuff!
      Visited with @hamtagger & @Fatpanda
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Cheers for looking
    • By The Urban Collective
      Hey, guys, this is a video from my recent exploration of Manchester's Victoria Arches.
      Unfortunately, we were caught entering and as I couldn't resist taking a peak I went it alone. However, we will be back to make a proper video report on the place.
      I was absolutely gutted to not get a proper vid but the footage I did get was half decent and worth it for the experience alone. This place holds so many memories and it is astonishing to wonder whats under our feet.
       
       
       
    • By UrbanLurking
      Explored here a couple of weeks ago seems a bit destroyed now which is a shame bet it was a decent explore at one point. 
      A bit of history,
      Royal Army Ordnance Corp (RAOC) Marchington, was built around 1957 and dealt with the supply and maintenance of weaponry and munitions and various other military equipment until 1993 when the Corp amalgamated with the Royal Logistics Corp. The site is now an industrial estate. It was also a Central Vehicle Depot during this time until the barracks closed in 1970, and the Territorial Army took over. Until it finally closed the site in the early 1980s. Marchington also housed the Armys fleet of Green Goddesses which came under the jurisdiction of the Office Of The Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM).The site is now an industrial estate. The Barracks lie bare and derelict and the married quaters have are all now private housing.
       




    • By AndyK!
      The Station Hotel is a grand Victorian building situated in the heart of Ayr town centre. The hotel consists of 71 bedrooms, complete with en-suite bathrooms, plus a host of suits for functions and a cocktail lounge.
       
      The hotel, which is attached to Ayr railway station, was originally opened by the Glasgow and South Western Railway in June 1866 and become part of the British Transport Hotels (BTH) at Nationalisation. It was sold by BTH in October 1951 and has changed ownership a number of times, having been owned by Stakis Hotels, Quality, and Swallow Hotels.
       
      The Station Hotel is currently the oldest and most famous hotel in Ayr. The hotel has retained almost all of its original features inside and out. The hotel started to turn away customers in 2014 and closed around 2015. After suffering neglect for some time beforehand, the building is now deteriorating; the railway station have had to take action to safeguard their customers from falling debris.
       
      Visited with
      @SpiderMonkey


      The car park is fenced off due to parts of the exterior falling off


      Entrance and staircase


      Reception




      Lift and staircase on the first floor

      Into the cocktail lounge....










      The corridor leading to the next parts was suffering decay due to leaks in the roof

      The Arran Suite...





      Restaurant...








      The restaurant's kitchen



      Other public spaces around the hotel...


       The Kyle Suite bar area

       
      The Carrick Room 

       
      The Kintyre Suite

       

      And finally, the hotel rooms...

       

       

       

       
      View of the decaying rear facade overlooking the railway station
    • By little_boy_explores
      Dobroyd mill
       

       
      The history
       
      Dobroyd Mills was built in 1829. A fine cloth manufacturer Dobroyd Ltd was founded at the mill in 1919. The mill closed in 1974, but was re-opened in 1976 under John Woodhead Ltd spinners. It currently houses several businesses including a classic car restoration firm and tea rooms. The future of Dobroyd Mills became a subject of debate when the current owners Z Hinchliffe began reducing the height of the chimney last year (2011). Concerned neighbours referred Dobroyd Mill to the English Heritage when the works began. But an inspector from  English Heritage decided the Mill was not suitable for the list of buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest.  Planning permission to knock down two sections on the northern end of the complex was granted by Kirklees Council last month (2012). The stone structures were deemed unsuitable for modern use.
       

       
      The explore
       
      The Mill resides in pleasant surroundings with parts rented to a few small businesses including a quaint tea room... doing some rather unorthodox rambling to the bemusement of nearby dog walkers we eventually arrived at the Mill.  The Mill sits on top of a stream and in it's surrounding offers some peace from modern living. The exterior is generally in good condition with little sign of vandalism... The Mill stretches over some 4.04 hectares and took just over an hour to explore. Theres a few original features scattered around including some pretty heavy duty scales ... eleswhere empty rooms which bizarrely looked like they had just received their annual spring clean. looks like 'Love 37' and 'CarrotBoy' have done a few jobs here too.  
       
      The pics
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

×