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I have hardly any information about this former boarding school. Apparently it was an institute for boys only. The building is in a decaying state. Fortunately, the vandalism isn´t too bad so far. The size of this insitution almost kills you. It´s very emotional to explore this part of history, when obviously a stong religious belief was one of the most important parts of education. 

As already mentioned above, this institution was huge. It´s picturesquely embedded between hills. It consisted not only of numerous dormitories and classrooms but its own chapel  and infirmary - with rusty bed frames and old medical stuff left behind - as well. You´ll find traces of religious importance again and again, for example old images of saints - to remind you over and over about the importance of a strong belief that was once an omnipresent theorem in this institution. Let the pictures speak for themselves. 

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Edited by franconiangirl

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13 hours ago, Andy said:

What a great place. A friend told me, a lot of things there are destroyed now by local youth and so on.

Would be a shame...! :-( It was more or less untouched when we visited that place... But well, the old story I guess... :-/

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