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Andy

France Château de la Favorite (visited 11/2016)

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Château de la Favorite , also called "Château du Prince Charles", was built in 1734 according to the plans of the architect Germain Boffrand and under the direction of Jean Marchal. It was owned by Charles Alexander.

After his death in 1780, Emperor Joseph II inherited the castle, which offers it for sale.

Until the 1990s the castle was still in good condition. After another sale, the castle was gutted. The roof was secured and windows were walled in the 21st century.

A few years ago, it was still accessible through a window, unfortunately no longer today.

 

 

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