The_Raw

France CLM Colbert Anti Aircraft Missile Cruiser, France - January 2017

Really nice that m8ty. And bloody good shots. Thx for posting 

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Sounds like this was a fun trip, glad most if it was still there for you. Still looks great with all the guns :cool2:

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That's awesome! Like number 6, stands out for me. Sounds like a really fun trip, she's getting a tad rusty now. Still looks worth it though :thumb

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I thought you said your camera was fooked? I'll give you a tenner for it :D Great pictures and good to see this again :)

 

:comp: 

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9 hours ago, hamtagger said:

I thought you said your camera was fooked? I'll give you a tenner for it :D Great pictures and good to see this again :)

 

:comp: 

 

Thanks guys.

 

Ok these came out alright but they're nowhere near as sharp as they should be, and there's a lot of unfixable issues with the camera..... It's fooked!!

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That's damn impressive. Love all the old tech, thanks for sharing this one.

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On 03/02/2017 at 8:17 AM, The_Raw said:

 

Thanks guys.

 

Ok these came out alright but they're nowhere near as sharp as they should be, and there's a lot of unfixable issues with the camera..... It's fooked!!

 

Pretty funny how much publicity your f00ked camera is getting :)

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Absolutely epic! Spot on shots to boot!

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Looks like a fun trip! can imagine how chuffed you was when you saw it after being told it was gone :D cracking report as always 

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Fantastic Set. Great that you could visit it at last.

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  • Similar Content

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