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UK New Scotland Yard, London - November 2016

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New Scotland Yard

 

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New Scotland Yard was located on Broadway in Victoria and has been the Metropolitan Police's headquarters since 1967. 

 

By the 1960s the requirements of modern technology and further increases in the size of the force meant that it had outgrown its Victoria Embankment site. In 1967 New Scotland Yard moved to the site on Broadway, which was an existing office block acquired under a long-term lease.

 

The Met's senior management team was based at New Scotland Yard, along with the Met's crime database. This uses a national computer system developed for major crime enquiries by all British forces, called Home Office Large Major Enquiry System, more commonly referred to by the acronym HOLMES, which recognises the great fictional detective Sherlock Holmes. The training programme is called 'Elementary', after Holmes's well-known, yet apocryphal, phrase "elementary, my dear Watson". 

 

A number of security measures were added to the exterior of New Scotland Yard during the 2000s, including concrete barriers in front of ground-level windows as a countermeasure against car bombing, a concrete wall around the entrance to the building, and a covered walkway from the street to the entrance into the building. Armed officers from the Diplomatic Protection Group patrolled the exterior of the building along with security staff.

 

In May 2013 the Metropolitan Police confirmed that the New Scotland Yard building on Broadway would be sold and the force's headquarters would be moved back to the Curtis Green Building on the Victoria Embankment, and renamed Scotland Yard. Ahead of the move to the Embankment, the Metropolitan Police sold New Scotland Yard to Abu Dhabi Financial Group in December 2014 for £370 million. Staff left New Scotland Yard on 1 November 2016, when ownership of the building was passed to Abu Dhabi Financial Group who plan to redevelop the site into luxury apartments, offices and shops. The Metropolitan Police are due to move to the Embankment in early 2017.

 

Since this appeared on here a couple of months ago I've visited a few times with @Maniac, @KM Punk, @starlight, @extreme_ironing, @Miss.Anthrope, @adders@Porkerofthenight, @DirtyJigsaw, @TrollJay@Merryprankster, monkey, suboffender, silentwalker, theriddler, dragonsoop, and many non members. Most of these photos were taken on my first visit when we did a sweep of every floor looking for anything of interest. Much had been stripped before the Met handed it over unfortunately but there was still enough to make it a decent explore. The view from the roof is pretty sensational on a clear evening, made even more special by the fact you are sitting on top of perhaps the most notorious police Headquarters in the world. A great place for a dragon soop and some classic 80s tunes. 

 

 

 

1. Starting from the bottom and working our way up, the underground car park. Sadly no bunkers or anything quite so interesting under here. 

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2. Security control room for monitoring cctv and opening gates.

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3.

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4.

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5. Press conference room

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6. Briefing room

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7. Locker room, now in use by construction workers. 

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8. A message from the last officer to leave

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9. These marble lift lobbies were the only bit of grandeur really, the lifts were still fully functional which came in handy a couple of times. 

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10. 

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11. The remains of a once plush office 

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12. How most of the building looked....stripped and being prepared for a new lease of life 

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13. Pretty much every floor had large server rooms in the centre, this one in particular held restricted access servers.

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14. Where firearms would have been distributed, there was a similar firearms storage room on the ground floor. 

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15. Label on the cupboard above

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16. Sand boxes presumably for discharging rounds of ammo when handing in firearms 

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17. safe room

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18.

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19. Bridge connecting the two buildings together

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20. Just off the bridge sat this lecture theatre, a week later it was completely ripped to pieces.

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21.

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22. Canteen

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23. Cctv monitoring work station

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24. 

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25. Plant room on the top floor

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26. Engineer's control room

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27.

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28. And last but not least, the rooftop. 

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29.

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30. 55 Broadway, TfL's art deco Headquarters until recently 

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31. Buckingham Palace 

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32. One of the best views in London really

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33.

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34.  

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35. Fish eye view from the top of the mast.

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Scotland Yard, it's been emotional.....

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Spot on photos mate, you really did see it all didnt you, i suppose you should have the amount of times you visited haha! Cheers for having me along man

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Excellent stuff there mate, a little bit of everything :) 

 

Pic 16 is a loading/unloading pit - the person with the firearm will point it into the sand whilst carrying out the load/unload/make safe drill. It's only a safety measure in case they fuck up the drill and isnt intended to be shot into regularly :) 

 

:comp: 

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On 24 February 2017 at 1:11 PM, Lara said:

Nicely done, flipping brilliant :) 

 

Cheers it is a banger of a view, and @Lara and hello stranger! :) 

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