WildBoyz

UK
RAF Spadeadam Airfield, Northumberland - March 2017

Nice this mate :thumb

 

:comp:

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looks like a fun day out! is it one of those if the red flag is flying dont walk around ranges or just pray they aren't dropping bombs and hope for the best?

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Good effort, cracking pics too :thumb

 

Having worked up there I know how remote the place is as well as how difficult it is to wander across the moors and pine forests. Never saw the planes while I was there, but that was a fair few years ago!

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I really enjoyed reading your report and pic 11 is damn good.Well done on your effort

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Very nice that m8ty. Some cracking shots. Top gunning.

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That's an absolute belter :thumb  

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Amazing! Well worth all the mud :)

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Impressive pictures but I must add that it's pretty risky wandering around a live bombing/ECM range!

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When I'm in the UK I'm always on the lookout for derelict aircraft, so this is outstanding to see.

 

Talking of which, it's been on my mind for ages. Has anyone here had a go at the aircraft at Teeside airport? Looks like there's loads there!

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Nice one! Especially number 11.

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Thanks for the comments everyone, and cheers for looking. To answer your question @-Raz- it's a live site that they drop bombs on and, judging by the holes in some of the aircraft, shoot at. There are no 'Keep Out' signs though :) only the red flags you spoke of. 

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Looks great, my favorite from your set is pic #11 with the fantastic light.

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  • Similar Content

    • By Mikeymutt
      Visited this old house a few months back.from the outside it just looks like a very small run down derelict cottage.but once inside its like a little time warp.nothing had been touched for a very long time.the pictures still hung on the wall.cobwebs everywhere.the place was a nightmare to shoot and very dark and dingy in most rooms
       
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
       
       
    • By WildBoyz
      History

      The Wallaceville Animal Research Centre, located in Wellington, New Zealand, was a Government-owned veterinary and animal research centre. Following the establishment of the New Zealand Department of Agriculture in 1892, a new facility was commissioned to undertake research on livestock, which could then be applied to help farming communities across the country. The laboratory was eventually constructed in 1905. Before this time, research had simply been carried out in temporary makeshift laboratories in Wellington. 

      New Zealand’s only Government Veterinary Surgeon, John Gilruth, was appointed as Wallaceville Laboratory’s founder and officer-in-charge. Gilruth had spent many years investigating stock diseases in New Zealand and France, so he was already a chief veterinarian, government bacteriologist and fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. According to historical records, Scottish-born Gilruth went on to become the Administrator of the Northern Territory in Darwin, Australia. However, his blunt, dynamic style of leadership, which was often viewed as being arrogant and insensitive, resulted in the Darwin Rebellion in 1918. Subsequently, Gilruth was forced to resign from his position and evacuate the Northern Territory under the protection of HMAS Encounter, a military cruiser. 

      As for the research facility in Wallaceville, it continued to expand over the years as more land surrounding the original building was drained and cleared. In the end, over two hundred people worked for the veterinary facility and one hundred acres of land were developed into laboratory buildings and pastures for farm stock and growing oats and other crops for animal feed. However, following plans to relocate the site at the beginning of the millennium, the facility closed in 2007. After the move, the site remained abandoned until 2014, when part of the site was redeveloped into a business park. The remaining farmland and pastures were later sold to a private owner for property development. 

      Our Version of Events

      And so, we come to our final explore in New Zealand, before we made the incredibly long journey back to England. We were in Wellington, ready to catch our flight but decided there was still time for one last dirty derp. In the end, there’s always time for a quickie. 

      After quick head’s up from Urbex Central NZ, then, we found ourselves stood outside the oldest veterinary facility in the southern hemisphere. Gaining access wasn’t particularly difficult, despite it being situated on a relatively active business park. We simply strutted in with ninja-like skills and managed to squeeze through an inhumanly-sized hole in the roof, right at the tippy top. 

      Once inside, it was immediately obvious that touching anything would be a very bad idea, as it would probably result in us contracting a form of AIDs. The contents of various cardboard boxes we found happened to have chicken varieties, cow ones and a couple of strains belonging to pigs. There were plenty of other vials of diseases scattered throughout the site too, which made our initial paranoia about cutting a finger or grazing an arm even more pronounced. Fortunately, though, we seem to have made it out unscathed.

      All in all, then, the explore was really good. There was plenty of stuff left over, and we had to sneak around a bit to avoid being seen by anyone wandering around outside which is always fun. The entire building still had a 1905 feeling to it too, since everything looked dated compared to a modern-day laboratory such as GSK. We spent roughly forty-five minutes inside, and then called it a day because we’d managed to take snaps of every room. Getting back out, however, was a mighty task since it suddenly became extremely busy outside with cars and people passing by. Somehow, though, and we’re really not quite sure how, we still managed to avoid getting caught by anyone as we retraced the steps we’d initially taken to get inside. 

      Farewells and Some Acknowledgements

      On and off since 2014, we’ve been travelling back and forth between the UK and New Zealand. This explore stands as the last explore we’re likely to do in New Zealand for a good while because the coffers are now almost entirely depleted. At this point in time then, we would like to take the opportunity to thank everyone we’ve met, explored and gotten caught by the police with, particularly Urbex Central New Zealand. In particular, we would like to thank our friend, Nillskill, for sharing locations and taking the time to travel around most of the country with us. In total, we managed to explore over one-hundred and eleven sites together. You will be missed, but we look forward to your proposed visit to the UK at some point in the near future. We would also like to mention a few more names of those we’ve met along the way: Bane, Gunner, Zort, Nadita, Harley, René, The Mexican Bandit and Dylan. It was a real pleasure to have met you all, and we’re happy that we managed to spend some time exploring together, even if one of you does insist on being called Zort in everyday life. Stay safe, ladies and gents. Cheerio. 

      WildBoyz.

      Explored with Nillskill.
       
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    • By urbexdevil
      Visiting a few times previously for non urbex related reasons, and touching on a few abandoned vehicles previously, little did I know the whole site is actually an old military themed action park.

      Waiting for the next opportunity to pop up and head over again, I took my chance, grabbed the camera and walked about. Even meeting someone on site who knew all about the place when it was open, quite handy to have a tour guide with history on the place!
       
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      There’s plenty of history about but to save reading numerous news articles…
       
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • By WildBoyz
      History

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      Our Version of Events

      There’s not a great deal to say about this one.Urbex Central happened to mention they knew the whereabouts of an abandoned fire station, so, in their company, we decided to go take a look. We were immediately sold on the idea after they brought up it still had poles. That’s about the only thing it had going for it mind you. Since being abandoned in 2007, the station has been well and truly stripped of anything of value so it’s largely just a shell these days. However, as noted above, the poles do still exist, and they were easy to find across the site because they sit behind ‘Pole Drop’ doors on the upstairs floors. So, if you happen to be passing by, make sure you pop in and have a quick session on the poles. 

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    • By hamtagger
      RAF Church Fenton
       
      The Explore
       
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      The History
       
      First opened in 1937, RAF Church Fenton is the former home of the first American Eagle Squadrons and was formally regarded as one of the UK's most important strategic airfields, offering rapid reaction fighter defence to the industrial cities of Sheffield, Bradford and Leeds during the second World War. Now, after decades of faithful service in defence of the realm, the air station stands as a lonely hostage to both time and decay.
      On 1 April 1937 the station was declared open and on 19 April the first station commander Wing Commander W.E. Swann assumed command. Within two months, No. 71 Squadron RAF had arrived with their Gloster Gladiators. During September 1940 Church Fenton became home to the first "Eagle squadron" of American volunteers - No. 71 Squadron RAF and their Brewster Buffalos and Hawker Hurricanes. The airfield was also home to both the first all-Canadian and all-Polish squadrons, No. 242 Squadron RAF and No. 306 Squadron RAF respectively.
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      The Pictures
       
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      As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated  

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