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klempner69

UK Mountfield House Devon

This house seemed to come on the urbex scene then vanish.I was asked along on a visit here early March 2017.It was indeed a very interesting explore due the massive content of personal affects left behind as you will see.I understand the house was built 1865 and in the last few decades was converted into four flats.Each flat had a piano and we counted at least six pianos throughout!

The house belonged to Doctor Annette Drummond-Rees and I reckoned she was a shopaholic as all over this house in the last few years was bags of china ornaments that was purchased from charity shops,but the thing that surprised me was it appeared she simply put the bag on the stairs unopened never to be looked at again.Lets show you what I mean...

The House

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Part of the conversion has already started falling down

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A few old cars have been left to rot

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In the hallway we see the first of many many places to sit

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The good Doctors lounge or at least one of them!

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One of six pianos

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Another lounge

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Heading upstairs now

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The sight that greeted us on the landing..flats 2 and three with spare pianos ..more pianos later

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Those shopping bags containing ornaments from charity shops were strewn on every stair

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One of my fellow explorers got this to play the Dambusters record..a most surreal thing to hear from a distance

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I loved this arched window atop of the stairs

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Flat 2`s lounge..yes another piano!

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Flat 2 bedroom

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Dr Fox

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Flat 3 lounge..yep,complete with piano

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We are now in the attic rooms now

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Attic bedroom..looked pretty comfortable

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And lastly,some essential bedtime reading..

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Well that was Mountfield House folks,if you want a more concise walk through,the rest can be seen yer below

https://klempner69.smugmug.com/Mountfield-House-2017/

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Some nice bits left there :) 

 

:comp:

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Cracking that. Never seen so many pianos in one place!

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Awesome looking place, not often a UK manor comes up on the radar as good as this :thumb Always nice to see a mangy looking stuffed fox lol.

Oh and I think we know someone who might like another Triumph Acclaim!!

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Even if quite in a mess, still very nice and interesting. Great with the many pianos and the lot of details.

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