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klempner69

UK Selena House Swindon March 2017

This is one for any new explorers in the area who might be starting out and want an easy one.Selena House is or was a nursing home.I have little real history on it but by the looks of it,I reckon it was originally a detached house in grounds that was added to over time.In 2012 however,an inspection by the council found some serious quality issues regarding food,health and general hygiene.Before any action could be taken,the owner decided to hand in his license and close the home.It quickly fell into disrepair with the final straw coming in the shape of a fire several years ago that destroyed about a third of it.There are though still a few rooms worth looking at namely the kitchen,the lounge and many residents rooms plus an interesting attic.Anyhow,I wont bore you any more..as I said,this one is really for noobs only...

The frontage is totally boring

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Smoke damaged residents room

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In the attic,this seemed to be a den of sorts,and there are stacks of paperwork left up there too.

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Dining Room

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Wild Sage bath

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And another residents room in better condition.

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And finally that kitchen

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Like I said,this really is a fetid place so would suite a noob..beware also when upstairs,as it is very very dangerous where the fire took hold

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Some health and safety matters need addressing there :grin2:

Get stuck in newbies!

 

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