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    • By urbexosaurus
      Ok, sometimes you pass a location that may not completely deserve a report on it's own, but well, since you're there, you decide to quickly take some snaps.
      Located only a few hundred meters from "The Chapel" in a tiny village with only 400 people we found this place by accident.
      A bit of history;
      In 1744 a wooden church was build for the evangelic community of Alt Jäschwitz. For some reason, in 1842 the wooden church was replaced by a new concrete church and was converted into a Lutheran church. They finished building the new church in 1844.
      In 1945, after the war, the church was abandoned simply because the Polish people that moved back into this area were catholic and didn't want to pray in a German church.
      Nowadays it's in a state beyond repair, but some tiny details inside still give you the impression that it once must have been a nice place.
      It's on the list of monuments in Poland, but it's unlikely it will ever get restored to it's former glory.
      Below two pictures taken in 1917 & 1919, showing the church and it's former beauty;


      Ok, definitely not my best set of images, but well, here we go;
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      Thanks for watching!
    • By Wevsky
      Slightly different from the norm as we made a late night visit so no available light what so ever!
      Thanks to SpaceInvader and Obscurity for a few tips on access used,bit of a shame as that is no longer doable so my self and Urban ginger had to scout for another way in...
      Brief history borrowed from Morgan606 as its a good snipit of info
      Ditton Research lab was originally opened by The Empire Marketing Board in 1930.
      The EMB was formed in May 1926 by the Colonial Secretary Leo Amery to promote inter-Empire trade and to persuade consumers to 'Buy Empire'. It was actually established as a substitute for tariff reform and protectionist legislation and this is why it was eventually abolished in 1933, as a system of imperial preference replaced free trade.
      The EMB had three principal aims: to support scientific research, promotion of economic analysis, and publicity for Empire trade.
      The purpose of this laboratory was to carry out experiments on the shipping of fruit across the high seas,in order to extend its life over long,seabourne journeys. This is where the "ship on land" experiment originated from.
      In 1969 the lab was incorporated into the nearby East Malling Research Station as the fruit storage section.
      On with the pics,must admit the pipes and other machinery odds and sods that are left made it worth the late night.















      Thankks for looking
    • By prettypeculiar
      During a conversation with a fellow explorer we  came to the conclusion that I have been able to visit some beautiful steelworks ... In the neighboring countries! Having this playground of rust and steel in my backyard and even went there, was quite embarrassing... . A bit later a date was set and another  week later I stood on the blast furnace, enjoying the sun and the view. Wow! I immediately understand why the great love for industry begins here for so many explorers.  And admit, there are worse places and views to eat your sandwiches.   After our picnic and the conclusion that my fellow explorers was severely sunburned, we went back and went to discover the beautiful places that this place has to offer , bumping into the resident copper-thieves here and there, but they didn't seem to feel bothered by our presence.
       
      1. the road up to the blast furnace. I love it that you can spot 'her'while you're gradually approaching. Also, active trains running by from the right hand side  make it a surreal experience 

       
      2. view from above

       
       
      3 +4 the mandatory selfies on the BF
       


       
      4. 'the fish'

       
      5 +6 : the giant squid 


       
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      12  the spider 

       
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    • By WildBoyz
      History

      The Wallaceville Animal Research Centre, located in Wellington, New Zealand, was a Government-owned veterinary and animal research centre. Following the establishment of the New Zealand Department of Agriculture in 1892, a new facility was commissioned to undertake research on livestock, which could then be applied to help farming communities across the country. The laboratory was eventually constructed in 1905. Before this time, research had simply been carried out in temporary makeshift laboratories in Wellington. 

      New Zealand’s only Government Veterinary Surgeon, John Gilruth, was appointed as Wallaceville Laboratory’s founder and officer-in-charge. Gilruth had spent many years investigating stock diseases in New Zealand and France, so he was already a chief veterinarian, government bacteriologist and fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. According to historical records, Scottish-born Gilruth went on to become the Administrator of the Northern Territory in Darwin, Australia. However, his blunt, dynamic style of leadership, which was often viewed as being arrogant and insensitive, resulted in the Darwin Rebellion in 1918. Subsequently, Gilruth was forced to resign from his position and evacuate the Northern Territory under the protection of HMAS Encounter, a military cruiser. 

      As for the research facility in Wallaceville, it continued to expand over the years as more land surrounding the original building was drained and cleared. In the end, over two hundred people worked for the veterinary facility and one hundred acres of land were developed into laboratory buildings and pastures for farm stock and growing oats and other crops for animal feed. However, following plans to relocate the site at the beginning of the millennium, the facility closed in 2007. After the move, the site remained abandoned until 2014, when part of the site was redeveloped into a business park. The remaining farmland and pastures were later sold to a private owner for property development. 

      Our Version of Events

      And so, we come to our final explore in New Zealand, before we made the incredibly long journey back to England. We were in Wellington, ready to catch our flight but decided there was still time for one last dirty derp. In the end, there’s always time for a quickie. 

      After quick head’s up from Urbex Central NZ, then, we found ourselves stood outside the oldest veterinary facility in the southern hemisphere. Gaining access wasn’t particularly difficult, despite it being situated on a relatively active business park. We simply strutted in with ninja-like skills and managed to squeeze through an inhumanly-sized hole in the roof, right at the tippy top. 

      Once inside, it was immediately obvious that touching anything would be a very bad idea, as it would probably result in us contracting a form of AIDs. The contents of various cardboard boxes we found happened to have chicken varieties, cow ones and a couple of strains belonging to pigs. There were plenty of other vials of diseases scattered throughout the site too, which made our initial paranoia about cutting a finger or grazing an arm even more pronounced. Fortunately, though, we seem to have made it out unscathed.

      All in all, then, the explore was really good. There was plenty of stuff left over, and we had to sneak around a bit to avoid being seen by anyone wandering around outside which is always fun. The entire building still had a 1905 feeling to it too, since everything looked dated compared to a modern-day laboratory such as GSK. We spent roughly forty-five minutes inside, and then called it a day because we’d managed to take snaps of every room. Getting back out, however, was a mighty task since it suddenly became extremely busy outside with cars and people passing by. Somehow, though, and we’re really not quite sure how, we still managed to avoid getting caught by anyone as we retraced the steps we’d initially taken to get inside. 

      Farewells and Some Acknowledgements

      On and off since 2014, we’ve been travelling back and forth between the UK and New Zealand. This explore stands as the last explore we’re likely to do in New Zealand for a good while because the coffers are now almost entirely depleted. At this point in time then, we would like to take the opportunity to thank everyone we’ve met, explored and gotten caught by the police with, particularly Urbex Central New Zealand. In particular, we would like to thank our friend, Nillskill, for sharing locations and taking the time to travel around most of the country with us. In total, we managed to explore over one-hundred and eleven sites together. You will be missed, but we look forward to your proposed visit to the UK at some point in the near future. We would also like to mention a few more names of those we’ve met along the way: Bane, Gunner, Zort, Nadita, Harley, René, The Mexican Bandit and Dylan. It was a real pleasure to have met you all, and we’re happy that we managed to spend some time exploring together, even if one of you does insist on being called Zort in everyday life. Stay safe, ladies and gents. Cheerio. 

      WildBoyz.

      Explored with Nillskill.
       
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