Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Recommended Posts

History

“Here in Sheffield we have a proud sporting heritage and it is important that we build upon that to create the right environment in which the sportsmen and women of the future can train, develop and thrive… But it isn’t just about the elite, it is about every man, woman and child in our city being fitter, healthier and enjoying physical activity” (Isobel Bowler, cabinet member for culture, sport and leisure at Sheffield council).

Chapeltown Baths opened sometime at the beginning of the 1960s. Locally, the facility was very popular, especially among children, and many people have indicated that the place has played a big part in their lives. The baths also held regular swimming galas which always attracted large audiences as parents and guardians would flock to the stands to observe. However, despite the fondness for the centre, it was often regarded as being too small and outdated. One for the clubs that used the pool on a regular basis, for instance, had to establish a waiting list for the people wanting to join. 

New plans to redevelop the site into a larger, more modern, venue were launched by Sheffield Council sometime between 2010 and 2015. Plans for the new facility revealed that a two-storey extension would be added to the front of the existing building, to house a gymnasium, flexible activity/exhibition space and a community café. The aim was to create a welcoming and revitalised health and fitness centre for the local area. The main entrance was to be moved to the back of the current site where a large glazed atrium would be constructed, and, as for the pool itself, it was to be modernised and larger changing areas for both males and females were to be installed. Nevertheless, in the end the plans were scrapped as it was decided that the site was simply too small to revamp and in the long run would not offer value for money. 

After the original plans were abandoned, a plan to build a brand-new leisure centre was proposed. The new £7 million project was quickly accepted and construction of the facility began in 2015, up the road from the old site in High Green. The erection of the new leisure centre was said to have been one of the first leisure developments in Sheffield in over a decade. The Thorncliffe Recreation Centre is now open and most of the staff from Chapeltown Baths were said to have been moved over. Various reports suggest that the new pool is larger and has an extra lane, and that a new community has been established there. Although the new site does not have the same character, local residents generally seem happy with the new facility. 

As for the former Chapeltown Baths site, it has remained abandoned since the beginning of 2016. No plans have been set in stone yet; however, it is rumoured that the building will be demolished to make way for affordable housing. In the meantime, like most abandoned sites, the building has experienced increasing incidents of vandalism in recent months as local goons have managed to get their hands on a few brushes, several tins of Wilko One Coat and a box of safety matches. Smoke at the site was reported in March 2017, coming from the basement, and this resulted in the fire service being called to attend the scene. It is reported that they and had to cut their way into the building to extinguish a small fire. Fortunately, in this instance there was very little damage. As things stand presently, SCAFF Security Alarms Ltd. claim they have sealed the premises and installed various security systems to prevent any further vandalism. 

Our Version of Events

With a couple of hours to kill before we hit some of Sheffield’s legendary pubs later that evening, we decided to pop across to Chapeltown and take a look at the old public swimming pool that had recently been brought to our attention. None of us have ever been to Chapeltown before and I can’t say we were expecting to discover anything amazing there, but one thing we did notice is that the townspeople aren’t doing themselves any favours in terms of attracting tourists to the area. For instance, there’s a large sign in the centre of the town that reads, ‘Fast trains to Sheffield and Barnsley’, implying that you should probably get going as soon as possible. However, we chose to ignore the advice and hang around for a little while instead. 

Finding the old swimming pool wasn’t particularly difficult. We sort of stumbled across it before needing to consult Google Maps for guidance. After that, we lingered around the bus stop that’s positioned right outside for a while, trying to work out why the metal shutter that should have been covering the main entrance looked like someone had had a go at it with a tin opener. At first, we were convinced that some incredibly ambitious explorer had decided to break in that way, rather than simply peel off a board. But, as we discovered later on, it turns out it was the firefighters who’d hacked a hole in the shutter. Even so, there was no evidence that they’d managed to get into the building that way – unless they had the keys to the building – because the front door behind it was still locked up tight. Fortunately, though, the shutter wasn’t the only opening the fire service had created. It is thanks to those guys, then, and their arsenal of cutting tools that we managed to get inside. 

Once inside the building, we didn’t have to worry about being spotted from the outside since all the windows at ground level had been boarded over. This made capturing images a bit easier because we could wave the torches around a bit. However, the downside to our visit was that we were a bit late getting to this one as the local goons have been inside and clearly they got a little bit overexcited. Hence why there’s a mountain of shit in the pool and broken glass everywhere. On the positive side, however, the fire damage was minimal, limited to a very small section of the basement area. In that sense, the rest of the building remains unscathed. 

All in all, it took us around forty minutes to cover the building from the basement to the loft. Afterwards, we left feeling satisfied that something new in Sheffield had turned up, but even more delighted that we were heading straight for The Fat Cat for no fewer than eight pints of Kelham Island’s finest and a plate of homemade curry. Many hours later, after an innumerable number of pints, two curries and several packets of peanuts, we staggered back out onto the streets of Sheffield. We were tempted to have a quick look at Minitron while we were so close, but since the lampposts on the other side of the street were swaying in a very unusual manner, we decided to call it a day and head back into town for one final pint before bed. 

Explored with Soul. 
 

1:

 

aDSC_0618_zpskvl1ophk.jpg

 

2:

 

aDSC_0520_zpshb3zyvtj.jpg

 

3:

 

aDSC_0526_zpskuxqxbit.jpg

 

4:

 

aDSC_0530_zpsjmuf36bm.jpg

 

5:

 

aDSC_0539_zpsos1tua4t.jpg

 

6:

 

aDSC_0540_zpsu1vxxgg5.jpg

 

7:

 

aDSC_0590_zpsowmu1xyt.jpg

 

8:

 

aDSC_0547_zpslfqqb7bp.jpg

 

9:

 

aDSC_0562_zps82fse08v.jpg

 

10:

 

aDSC_0566_zpsujnykkxg.jpg

 

11:

 

aDSC_0572_zps4ypqcxre.jpg

 

12:

 

aDSC_0575_zpsscr80rka.jpg

 

13:

 

aDSC_0574_zpsbnn76dmm.jpg

 

14:

 

aDSC_0576_zpsfkpjkul9.jpg

 

15:

 

aDSC_0580_zpsldbtginc.jpg

 

16:

 

aDSC_0582_zpsecnxj6un.jpg

 

17:

 

aDSC_0585_zpsx5xbzwh3.jpg

 

18:

 

aDSC_0586_zpstopwzv3k.jpg

 

19:

 

aDSC_0600_zpscgcshe2p.jpg

 

20:

 

aDSC_0601_zps48tin7h7.jpg

 

21:

 

aDSC_0603_zps3zjo3ynx.jpg

 

22:

 

aDSC_0604_zps7ia6gn3k.jpg

 

23:

 

aDSC_0606_zps4rri2cyh.jpg

 

24:

 

aDSC_0612_zpskbw8ye4k.jpg

 

25:

 

aDSC_0613_zpsb5r0dbwc.jpg

 

26:

 

aDSC_0615_zpsullgjeod.jpg

 

27:

 

aDSC_0616_zpsadydrd7d.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sad condition, the place has seen better days. But nice report; I like the pics 15 & 27

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Andy
      Formerly a cable factory was here (founded in 1837, closed in 2008, partially demolished). The air raid shelter was for the company's employees.   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9    
    • By Andy
      The oldest parts of the church dates back to the 12th century, the octagonal tower was added in the 13th century. The windows were renewed in the 15th century and the roof in 1633. Further renovations took place in 1867 and 1874. The church was closed in 1987, but it's maintained until today.   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16    
    • By Zen1991
      So this is my first post on this forum, I found out about these houses on a Abandoned Lincolnshire group on Facebook and thought they were definitely worth a trip, but... the first trip wasn't very successful, the address for these houses took us to two houses on the other side of Withcall that were at one point abandoned but have since been knocked down, so after about half an hour of looking around it became very clear the houses weren't there.
       
      After talking to the person who posted them originally and finding out the real location we headed back up to find them. We had to make sure we kept quiet as there is a neighbor attached to the 2nd station house and we weren't sure they'd have appreciated a night time visit from 3 explorers haha. 
       
      Access to the house is easy, the doors being left open is always convenient. Walking around the houses only took 30 minutes or so , but was still a nice little explore. It's one of them places that besides a few repairs and some serious wallpapering, it looks like the family could just walk back through the front door and pick up their lives where they left off which gave the houses a real creepy vibe.
       
      I guess that's all that really needs to be said about these houses. Here's a few pictures: 
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Thanks for reading:) 
    • By woopashoopaa
      I visited this place with @Dangle_Angle and @Lavino after the main target of the day was a fail. Thanks to Lavino driving us here and even tho they had already been they also enjoyed the place to. I also got to learn how to use the camera a bit better . The inside of this place is amazing because the whole place hardly has any graffiti and the place is in pretty good condition. Also the whole place is made out of wood which gives a very nice feel to the place. Anyway here is some pictures and some history, hope you enjoy .

      George Barnsley and Sons Ltd. (founded 1836) They were in Cornish Place on the Don and specialised in forge filing and cutting tools for leather workers and shoe makers. One George Barnsley was Master Cutler in 1883.:

      George Barnsley and Son is listed in the 1837 Sheffield directory as a file manufacture situated on Wheeldon Street, The 1849 listing records a move to Cornhill and the 1852 to Cornesh works Cornesh street they had by this time also increased there product range to include steel files, shoe and butchers knives.

      They are again listed in 1944 as manufactures of files and blades shoe knives and leather workers tools.

      In the 1948 listing the business had become George Barnsley and Son Ltd

      George Barnsley died at his home at No 30 Collegiate Crescent on 30th March 1958, he lived there with his wife Mabel and mother-in-law Elizabeth. He was a partner in the firm which were steel and file manufacturers and the business was converted into a limited company about 10 years before his death.

      He had a long army career, joining up in 1896 and serving in the Boer war and two world wars. Colonel Barnsley played a leading part in the development of the Army Cadet Force in Sheffield. He Died Aged 83. (History from Lavino)
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • By Urbexbandoned
      History 
       
      Due to the aircraft stationed at RAF Coningsby there was an external bomb dump, in order to Reduce the quantities of explosives stored and the number of personnel exposed to risk, along with separating explosive processing from storage were the major lessons adopted in what I believe was the reason for a bomb dump further away than normal. 
      Historically I couldn't find much on this place. I did find out about an accident that occurred there in 1971 though. 
      An accident which killed 2 armourers while they were preparing 68mm SNEB Rockets. Without warning, one initiated in the process building they were working in. There was an unexplained electrostatic discharge causing the rocket motor to fire. 
       
      The Explore 
      Well this is pretty close for me, literally just down the road. I have been here before. Obviously having a connection to the RAF held some interest here. 
      I explored with @hamtagger as per  We had a relatively leisurely stroll around. As far as bomb dumps go it was 'normal' in layout and relatively huge.  Admin buildings scattered the front section of the site past the picket post and the remainder were process buildings or prep buildings. 
      We ventured in to one and noticed that we hadn't seen it before, on any reports or throughout social media but it was what was inside that caught my attention. Guns & not the handheld sort. I have had to do a bit of research on this because I wasn't aware that firstly they were Royal Navy guns & secondly what type of gun they were. It turns out that there was 2 types, the first was a GCM-A03 twin barrelled Oerlikon. This had a firing seat where someone could sit, almost like a little cabin. It was a bloody tight squeeze as well and I am tiny! Apparently capable of firing 650 rounds a minute. The second which there were 2 of didn't have a firing seat so it was fired by someone either standing up and shooting it or controlled electronically. The first fired 30mm rounds while the second fired 35mm rounds. Both would have been mounted on a ship & both had the barrels removed. Next to this we also found what we believe to be a small communication suite. I have never seen one before and may never do again but it was cosy and compact! We had more or less finished when we spotted 2 blokes part literally right outside & jump over the front gate, they seemed to follow us to the rear side of the site. No camera's or owt then just disappeared. 
      Anyway, enough of my waffle & on to the pics
       
       
      This is where they would have serviced Skyflash & Sidewinder missiles 
      1

       
      2

       
      This is the communication suite 
       
      3

       
      4

       
      The GCM-A03 twin cannon Oerlikon 
      5
       
       
      6

       
      7

       
      8

       
      This is it in action (Not my photo, obviously) 
      9

       
      This was the other gun, a GCM-A01 (I believe, could be wrong) 
      10

       
      The rest of the site 
       
      11

       
      12

       
      13

       
      14

       
      15

       
      16

       
      17

       
      A little mention of tornado here, which became stationed at Coningsby during the Gulf War 
      18

       
      Mercury Thallium is found in AIM-9 sidewinder missiles 
      19

       
      20

       
      21
       
       
      thanks for looking!

Disclaimer

Oblivion State exists as an online forum to allow like minded individuals to share their experiences of Urban Exploration. We do not condone breaking and entering or other criminal activity and advise all members to read the FAQ articles about the forum and urban exploring in general. All posts are the responsibility of the original poster and all images remain copyright to the original photographer.

We would just like to thank

Forum user AndyK! from Behind Closed Doors for our rather excellent new logo.

All of our fantastic team of Moderators who volunteer their time to keep this place running smoothly.

All of our members for continuing to support Oblivion State by posting up the most awesome content. Thank you everyone!
×