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    • By The_Raw
      A while back I posted a report from a creme de la menthe location called Chateau a la Mange Tout. This sanatorium sits on the same site, not bad having two half decent explores right next to each other, joie de vivre! I meant to post a report at the time but never got round to it. It wasn't massively photogenic so I only took a load of hand held shots but there was a fair bit of stuff inside. Bon appetit, as the French would say                                                                                               Last but not least we had a quick peek inside the morgue, no slab but some body fridges left behind.   Tres bien ensemble    
    • By Gromr123
      This one is from earlier on in the year during a trip to France/Luxembourg, one I thought worth posting up here!
       
      Chateau Lumiere needs no introduction, a magnificent building with such grandeur its hard to believe its been abandoned. The huge glass skylight allows daylight to illuminate all the floors, making for wonderful lighting. During the last few years Chateau Lumiere become a bit of a tourist destination, with vandals smashing the large mirror in the big foyer. Luckily its fared well over its many years of dereliction and is still one of the most beautiful buildings I have had the pleasure of exploring.

      History
       
      Built in early 1900s, this house was owned by a tobacco tycoon from Switzerland. After the owner moved away in 1950s, the house was used for business purposes, and was sold multiple times before finally being left empty. 
      There isn't a confirmed date it was abandoned, but the general consensus seems to say its in the 1980s. 

      The Explore
       
      After finally finding the location of it and seeing it was a reasonable distance from Luxembourg where were staying for 2 weeks, it  became a must do. We found a charming cheap hotel in the next town over and booked a night there. 
      Finally the day was upon us and were there, stood outside awestruck by the Neo-Baroque styling of Lumiere.
      We looked for a way inside and quickly found a well beaten track round the back. As we approached I could hear voices inside.
      We definitely weren't the only visitors that day, in fact there were loads of people wondering around inside! 
      Most other people were explorers like us, however some weren't there to take photos as it turned out a bit later...
       
      We started with the basement and worked upwards. The basement actually had quite a bit of stuff still left there, unlike the rest of the floors that were bare to say the least. In fact the house was almost empty from the ground floor up. All the fittings and fixtures remained, but no personal items were left at all. 
      We photographed it from nearly every angle we could think of. The best thing about Lumiere is just how photogenic it is. Its hard to take a bad picture.
      It was a fairly relaxed explore, until we witnessed a group of 12 year olds smashing the glass skylight and then coming downstairs smashing bricks onto the marble floor. The red-mist descended as I yelled down at them at them from one of the skylight balcony's while waving my arms around like a loony. I must have looked like a madman. 
      They didn't understand my English, I certainly didn't understand their French. Luckily they didn't stick around much longer to do any more damage. 
       
      With the drama over we got back to the explore, now alone in the house. 
      We spent about 3 hours inside in total, but you could easily spent much longer there if you wanted to photograph everything. 
      One thing that struck me was the quality of every little detail. Silly things like the latches on the windows still work flawlessly and feels better made and smoother than any modern window latch I've used before. 
       
      Anyway, on with the photos.
       
       
      Photos
       
      Externals
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Internals
       
      In the porch there is this notice, translates roughly too:
       
      "Many of us have seen that you like this in all its splendor. Photographers, Models, Fans of Urbex, but some unscrupulous individuals do not respect...Alas!
      Yet you are known everywhere for your splendor, and the sublime cliches that you have brought us.
      Today April 19, 2015 we owe you this ... to give you a bit of sparkle ... after the vandalism that you have undergone.
      Thank you to those who will preserve you forever
      Respect this place as you would at home
      PLEASE!
      Do not break! Do not vandalize it..
      Do not leave rubbish, paper etc..

      Bring your waste back with you.."
       

       

      The entrance hall and foyer.

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Sadly this used to be where the the large mirror was, but was broken in 2015.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
      A rather interesting choice of wallpaper...
       

       

       

      Recent damage to the glass skylight.
       

       

       

      Saw this in the loft and couldn't help but get a photo too
       

       
       
      The Details
       

       

       

       
       
      The Basement
       

       

       

    • By Gromr123
      This one required an early start, but the morning adventure to The Kings Hall was worth the effort. Visited with Zombizza. 

      History
      "Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films.
      By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church.
      The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013"

      The Explore
      Started nice and early, and managed our entrance fairly incident free...if we don't count the massive tear in my trousers..
      It's a pretty spectacular place with a wonderful blend of natural decay and marvelous original features/architecture. With little to no daylight, we decided to wonder round the back rooms while the sun came up before the spending too much time on the main attraction, the large auditorium. 
      The rooms around the back are a weird mix of new and old, some of them being more disgusting than others. One room was so pungent that I took 2 steps in before bailing out. 
      There was also one room that was filled with beds, old food packets and needles. Looked a few years old, but squatters for sure. 
      The larger rooms consisted of meeting rooms, prayer rooms and teaching rooms. All of them had funky wavy flooring where the wooden floor tiles had expanded with moisture.
      Eventually the sun came up and the auditorium started to flood with the golden morning light.
      After a few hours we left, although the exit was hilariously unsubtle.

      Photos
       
      The Auditorium
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       



       

       

       

       

       

       

       



       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • By The_Raw
      This extravagant castle was originally built in 1605 to a more simple design. During the 19th century it underwent an Arabian style makeover which took 40 years to reach completion. No attention was spared to detail, with each and every one of the 365 rooms given its own identity. During the second world war it was looted by the Germans. After that it became a luxury hotel until it closed it's doors in 1990. Since then various plans have fallen through and a very recent sale attempt was upheld by Italian courts so its future remains unknown. 
       
      I visited here with @Miss.Anthrope, a place we'd both had firmly at the top of our wish lists for some time. We could've spent hours in here but decided to air on the side of caution and keep our visit relatively short as we'd been asked to leave the area by security the day before. I guess it was pretty obvious what we were up to with camera bags and tripods peeking over the fence and we'd been spotted on cctv. On our return we made sure not to make the same mistake as they are definitely keeping an eye on the place. Derelict buildings don't come much more stunning than this. 
       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
      Ciao bella

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