SpiderMonkey

France
Chateau Sarco - April 2017

First report from the latest trip abroad! This old mansion sits in a small village, the gates are wide open and the locals don't seem to even care about it. The highlight here was definitely the grand entrance hall, surrounded by pillars, red carpet, grand staircase, and a lumiere-esque balcony above it. There were also some pretty nice side rooms too.
From what I can gather the last use this building had was as a hotel, judging by the slight modernization of some areas. 

A nice relaxed explore with @AndyK! and Kriegaffe9.

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Featuring: My tripod because I'm too lazy to shop it out.

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Cheers :thumb

9

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That entrance is a stunner yeah! Nice one man

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Nailed this one! Really impressive place.

 

:comp:

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That's mint! Im liking that green room :) 

That viewing balcony is lovely with the wrought iron too :thumb 

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That is bloody lovely. Spot on SM :thumb

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That's a stunner. The Green Room is very impressive, also the railing.

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  • Similar Content

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      The Maginot Line, named after the French Minister of War André Maginot, was a line of concrete fortifications, obstacles, and weapon installations built by France in the 1930s to deter invasion by Germany. It was constructed along the borders with Switzerland, Germany, and Luxembourg. Ouvrage translates as "works" in English: published documents in both English and French refer to these fortifications in this manner, rather than as "forts". An ouvrage typically consists of a series of concrete-encased strongpoints on the surface, linked by underground tunnels with common underground works (shops, barracks, and factories etc.). Constructions started in the early 1930s. They served during the Second World War, and were often reused during the Cold War before being gradually abandoned by the French army. 
       
      Ouvrage Bréhain is part of the Fortified Sector of the Crusnes of the Maginot Line. It was approved for construction in May 1931 and completed at a cost of 84 million francs. The gros ouvrage was equipped with long-range artillery, and faced the border with Luxembourg. It saw no major action in either the Battle of France in 1940 or the Lorraine Campaign of 1944. 
       
      Bréhain is a large ouvrage with a gallery system extending over 1,500 metres (4,900 ft) from end to end. The munitions and personnel entries are located far to the rear of the compactly arranged combat blocks, with the entries hidden in the woods. An "M1" ammunition magazine is located just inside the ammunition entry, while the underground barracks are located near the junction of the two entry galleries. From there a long, straight gallery runs at an average depth of 30 metres (98 ft) to eight combat blocks. As part of an uncommenced second phase, Bréhain was to receive a second 135mm turret. A gallery was projected to link the turret block to the Casemate de l'Ouest de Bréhain, which was built as (and remained) an unconnected infantry combat block. The ouvrage has two entries and eight combat blocks.
       
      The 1940 manning of the ouvrage under the command of Commandant Vanier comprised 615 men and 22 officers of the 128th Fortress Infantry Regiment and the 152nd Position Artillery Regiment. The units were under the umbrella of the 42nd Fortress Corps of the 3rd Army, Army Group 2.
       
      On 21 June 1940 Brehain engaged advancing German troops, but saw no serious action Bréhain's chief efforts went to the support of neighboring fortifications, with 20,250 75mm, 1,780 81mm and 2,220 135mm shells fired between September 1939 and June 1940. 4200 shots were fired in support of actions at Esch 10–14 May 1940, and 10,145 shots of all kinds were fired 13–25 June 1940. The 22 June 1940 armistice brought an end to fighting. However, the Maginot fortifications to the west of the Moselle did not surrender immediately, maintaining their garrisons through a series of negotiations. Bréhain, along with Mauvais-Bois, Bois-du-Four and Aumetz surrendered on 27 June.
      In 1951 Bréhain was renovated for use against a potential invasion by Warsaw Pact forces, becoming part of the môle de Rochonvillers strongpoint in company with Rochonvillers, Molvange and later Immerhof. After the establishment of the French nuclear strike force, the importance of the Line declined, and most locations were sold to the public or abandoned.
       
      Visited with @Andy, @Maniac, @extreme_ironingand Elliot5200. This was the main destination of our trip, although we ended up visiting 4 others while over there. The place is huge, we only saw a portion of it due to time. Luckily the one combat block we checked was complete with all it's original gun machinery intact. Another nice feature of this one was the old murals and posters dotted around the place. Amazing place, need to return and see the rest of it! 
       
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      Thanks for looking. 
    • By Andy
      Ouvrage Bréhain is part of the Fortified Sector of the Crusnes of the Maginot Line. The gros ouvrage was equipped with long-range artillery, and faced the border with Luxembourg. It saw no major action in either the Battle of France in 1940 or the Lorraine Campaign of 1944.
      Bréhain was approved for construction in May 1931. It was completed at a cost of 84 million francs by the contractor Ballot of Paris. Compared with its neighbors, the ultimate plans for Aumetz, Bréhain, Bois-du-Four and Ouvrage Mauvais-Bois closely resemble each other, but Bréhain is the most fully realized, with only one unbuilt combat block and an unconnected casemate block. Its neighbors were built as petits ouvrages, to be developed with full tunnel networks at a later date.
       
      Bréhain is a large ouvrage with a gallery system extending over 1,500 metres (4,900 ft) from end to end. The munitions and personnel entries are located far to the rear of the compactly arranged combat blocks, with the entries hidden in the woods. An "M1" ammunition magazine is located just inside the ammunition entry, while the underground barracks are located near the junction of the two entry galleries. From there a long, straight gallery runs at an average depth of 30 metres (98 ft) to eight combat blocks. As part of an uncommenced second phase, Bréhain was to receive a second 135mm turret. A gallery was projected to link the turret block to the Casemate de l'Ouest de Bréhain, which was built as (and remained) an unconnected infantry combat block.
      The ouvrage has two entries and eight combat blocks.
       
      The 1940 manning of the ouvrage under the command of Commandant Vanier comprised 615 men and 22 officers of the 128th Fortress Infantry Regiment and the 152nd Position Artillery Regiment. The units were under the umbrella of the 42nd Fortress Corps of the 3rd Army, Army Group 2.
       
      On 21 June 1940 Brehain engaged advancing German troops, but saw no serious action Bréhain's chief efforts went to the support of neighboring fortifications, with 20,250 75mm, 1,780 81mm and 2,220 135mm shells fired between September 1939 and June 1940. 4200 shots were fired in support of actions at Esch 10–14 May 1940, and 10,145 shots of all kinds were fired 13–25 June 1940. The 22 June 1940 armistice brought an end to fighting. However, the Maginot fortifications to the west of the Moselle did not surrender immediately, maintaining their garrisons through a series of negotiations. Bréhain, along with Mauvais-Bois, Bois-du-Four and Aumetz surrendered on 27 June.
      In 1951 Bréhain was renovated for use against a potential invasion by Warsaw Pact forces, becoming part of the môle de Rochonvillers strongpoint in company with Rochonvillers, Molvange and later Immerhof. After the establishment of the French nuclear strike force, the importance of the Line declined, and most locations were sold to the public or abandoned.
       
      Visited with @The_Raw, @Maniac, @extreme_ironing and Elliot5200.
       
       
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    • By The_Raw
      The Maginot Line, named after the French Minister of War André Maginot, was a line of concrete fortifications, obstacles, and weapon installations built by France in the 1930s to deter invasion by Germany. It was constructed along the borders with Switzerland, Germany, and Luxembourg. Ouvrage translates as "works" in English: published documents in both English and French refer to these fortifications in this manner, rather than as "forts". An ouvrage typically consists of a series of concrete-encased strongpoints on the surface, linked by underground tunnels with common underground works (shops, barracks, and factories etc.). Constructions started in the early 1930s. They served during the Second World War, and were often reused during the Cold War before being gradually abandoned by the French army. 
       
      Ouvrage Rochonvillers
       
      Ouvrage Rochonvillers is one of the largest of the Maginot Line fortifications. Located above the town of Rochonvillers in the French region of Lorraine, the gros ouvrage or large work was fully equipped and occupied in 1935 as part of the Fortified Sector of Thionville in the Moselle. It is located between the petit ouvrage d'Aumetz and the gros ouvrage Molvange, facing the border between Luxembourg and France with nine combat blocks. Rochonvillers saw little action during World War II, but due to its size it was repaired and retained in service after the war. During the Cold War it found a new use as a hardened military command center, first for NATO and then for the French Army until 1998. The ouvrage remains under the control of the French Army.  
       
      Sadly the bunker has suffered badly from fire damage throughout and has been ransacked. Only a few areas remain intact. Visited with @Maniac, @Andy,@extreme_ironing and Elliot5200.
       
      1. Camouflaged entrance

       
      2. No stairs in here, just a long ramp taking you underground

       
      3. Fire damage is immediately evident 

       
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      5. Burnt bed frames

       
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      7. A large section has been rebuilt with mundane breeze blocks for the Cold war era, this was updated in the 80s

       
      8. Lecture theatre with torn projection screen

       
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      14. An entire block of bedrooms remains in good condition with all the beds still in place

       
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      17. These engines also still in reasonable condition considering.

       
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      19. Control room, sadly ripped to pieces now. 

       
      20. How it looked in the 90s, a glimpse of how nice this place might have been when it was immaculate. Shame it's so trashed now. 

       
      Camp d'Angevillers
       
      The camp of Angevillers is part of a barracks located near ouvrages Molvange and Rochonvillers. It was built at the same time as the Maginot line, construction was completed in April 1933. It is now used occasionally for military exercises. All the buildings were pretty much empty but still made for a nice wander.
       
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      30. Inside the water tower

       
      Thanks for looking.
    • By The_Raw
      The Maginot Line, named after the French Minister of War André Maginot, was a line of concrete fortifications, obstacles, and weapon installations built by France in the 1930s to deter invasion by Germany. It was constructed along the borders with Switzerland, Germany, and Luxembourg. Ouvrage translates as "works" in English: published documents in both English and French refer to these fortifications in this manner, rather than as "forts". An ouvrage typically consists of a series of concrete-encased strongpoints on the surface, linked by underground tunnels with common underground works (shops, barracks, and factories etc.). Constructions started in the early 1930s. They served during the Second World War, and were often reused during the Cold War before being gradually abandoned by the French army. 
       
      Ouvrage Latiremont is a gros (large) ouvrage of the Maginot Line, located in the Fortified Sector of the Crusnes, sub-sector of Arrancy. It lies between the gros ouvrage Fermont and the petit ouvrage Mauvais Bois, facing Belgium. More than 1,200 metres (3,900 ft) of underground galleries connect the entries to the farthest block, at an average depth of 30 metres (98 ft). The gallery system was served by a narrow-gauge (60 cm) railway that continued out of the ammunition entrance and connected to a regional military railway system for the movement of material along the front a few kilometres to the rear. Several "stations" along the gallery system, located in wider sections of gallery, permitted trains to pass or be stored. The 1940 manning of the ouvrage under the command of Commandant Pophillat comprised 21 officers and 580 men of the 149th Fortress Infantry Regiment. 
       
      Latiremont was active in 1939-1940, coming under direct attack in late June 1940. From September 1939 to June 1940, Latiremont fired 14,452 75mm rounds and 4,234 81mm rounds at German forces and in support of neighbouring units. It was not until June 1940 that Latiremont and Fermont were directly attacked by the German 161st Division, which brought 21 cm howitzers and 30.5 cm mortars on 21 June. By this time, German units were moving in the rear of the Line, cutting power and communications. Heavy fire repelled attacks but Latiremont's garrison surrendered to the Germans on 27 June 1940.
       
      After renovations during the Cold War, it was abandoned.
       
      This was the first of 3 gros ouvrages I visited with Elliot5200, @Maniac, and @extreme_ironing. Also good to hook up with @Gromr123 who happened to be nearby on this occasion. Photos can't quite convey how large it is in here, 1.5km from one end to the other. We only saw a portion of it due to time constrictions, but you could easily spend a whole day in here.   
       
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      4. Some amazing blast doors down here

       
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      7. Workshop with a lathe inside

       
      8. Remains of a kitchen

       
      9. Shower block

       
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      12. Blast door inside one of the attack blocks on the surface

       
      13.Some rusty gun machinery still in situ

       
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      17. Another epic blast door

       
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      20. Engine Room

       
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      24. Train station for bringing in materials, the platform on the left

       
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      26. <3 this door 

       
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      Cheers for looking  
    • By The_Raw
      The Maginot Line, named after the French Minister of War André Maginot, was a line of concrete fortifications, obstacles, and weapon installations built by France in the 1930s to deter invasion by Germany. It was constructed along the borders with Switzerland, Germany, and Luxembourg. Ouvrage translates as "works" in English: published documents in both English and French refer to these fortifications in this manner, rather than as "forts". An ouvrage typically consists of a series of concrete-encased strongpoints on the surface, linked by underground tunnels with common underground works (shops, barracks, and factories etc.). Constructions started in the early 1930s. They served during the Second World War, and were often reused during the Cold War before being gradually abandoned by the French army. This particular ouvrage consists of two combat blocks connected by an underground gallery and was manned by 100 men before surrendering to the Germans in 1940.
       
      I put this on the list of things to check despite information suggesting it was secured. Glad I did as it turned out to be pretty nice inside. All items have been removed but it's pretty clean with some nice signage and murals on the walls throughout. Just a small part of a very fruitful trip with @Maniac @extreme_ironingand Elliot5200.
       
      1. Starting from ground level

       
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      4. Coat of arms painted on the wall

       
       
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      6. Sealed entrance in one of the combat blocks.

       
      7. Hand painted signage could be found everywhere: 'Victory'

       
      8. 'One for all, and all for one', the motto of the Three Musketeers 

       
      9. 'Be a man'

       
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      23. 'Honor work solidarity'

       
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      27. 'Secrecy is a matter of honor for communications personnel'

       
      28. Notice the dirty footprints up the wall, not sure how those got there. 

       
      29. This mural was definitely the coolest find. 

       
      30. Just to finish off, a couple of pics from another petit ouvrage that was also meant to be sealed. It was flooded in here, the water reached waist deep in this brickwork tunnel so we had to give up. 

       
      31. Calcite coated the floor throughout.

       
      32. Gun machinery would have been positioned here.

       
      Cheers for looking  
       
       
       
       

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