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Landie_Man

UK E.P. Bray, Chisworth Dye Works, Glossop – July 2017

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E.P. Bray, Chisworth Dye Works, Glossop – July 2017

 

So during a fairly unsuccessful road trip of a 20:4 fail ration on a huge 650 mile round trip, Northern Road Trip, Mookster and I arrived here.  Nestled next to a public footpath; access was pretty easy, and although stripped, I rather enjoyed this one.  Some lovely colours and decay going on inside.

 

What I will say is; there are signs everywhere warning of Lead Chromate contamination inside from the production of coloured dyes.  It is absolutely everywhere! Lovely…..!  

 

Built at the end of the 18th or in the early 19th centuries; Chisworth Works was as a cotton band manufactory.  During these times, the site was called “Higher Mill”. It appears that the original building was extended twice to the rear in its past, as there are noticable lines in the mortarwork and mismatches in the courses along the south-west elevation.

 

It is thought that these extensions took place before 1857 because the building line remains the same on the maps until 1973. The site was used as a dyeing works by 1973; and there was a large T-shaped extension at the rear which looks to have been added in two stages.

The only change a decade later,  was the construction of a square loading ramp at the front. The outline of the site today is the same as it was in 1984. E.P. Bray  began "winding-up" by 2006 and was dissolved/liquidised and the site shut down in September that year.

 

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More At:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157685024774162

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On 14/09/2017 at 9:30 AM, prettypeculiar said:

love the mixture of colours there 

 

On 12/10/2017 at 10:51 PM, The_Raw said:

I really like this, nice colours and ferns for the win. 

 

Thanks guys. I liked it here. A lovely warmth throughout 

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