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    • By meepers
      It's been months sense I got out and explored an abandoned location.  There wasn't much left here, but it still felt great to be back on that horse again. 
       
    • By masodo
      HISTORY

       
      wiki text: Riverside Amusement Park was an amusement park in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA from 1903 to 1970. Originating as a joint venture between engineer/amusement park developer Frederick Ingersoll and Indianapolis businessmen J. Clyde Power, Albert Lieber, and Bert Fiebleman and Emmett Johnson, the park was built by Ingersoll's Pittsburgh Construction Company adjacent to Riverside City Park at West 30th Street between White River and the Central Canal in the Riverside subdivision of Indianapolis.
       
      The decade of the 1960s was not a kind one for Riverside Amusement Park, which was losing attendance for the first time since the end of World War II. By the time John Coleman lifted the "whites only" policy (in response to a series of protests organized by the NAACP Youth Council in 1963), the park was losing $30,000 a year.
       
      Increased cost of insurance, maintenance, and new rides, coupled with increased competition from the emerging theme parks, were cited by Coleman as the park closed for the last time at the end of the 1970 season. All the rides were sold or demolished by 1978.
       
      The land lay undisturbed for more than two decades, until the construction of the River's Edge subdivision in the early 2000s.
       

       
      ===========================================================================================================================================
       
      STORY
      In 1979 my buddies and I heard that they were getting ready to bulldoze the site of the long defunct Riverside Amusement Park in Indianapolis so we decided to drive by to get a final look. When we got there we were amazed to find easy access to the grounds. With my trusty Practica LLC at hand we ventured within and explored for several minutes until we came to the stark realization that this neglected plot of land had become the home to countless wild dogs. Picking up debris for clubs we beat a hasty retreat (pausing of course for a commemorative selfie.)
       
      The pictures were taken on 35mm slide film...  Back in 2005 I came across the slides and crapily scanned them using a junky flat-bed scanner and used those images to create the Animated GIF below to send cross country via email to one of the krew.
       
      If there is a prize for worst images on OS these would surely take it - but even in this 'State' they trigger memories of that adventure; so in that they are still doing their job...
       
      Impressionists Views of Riverside Amusement Park (circa 1979)

      I opened this GIF and extracted the individual images and tried to enhance them to some degree.
      I then repackaged thumbnails of these into a fresh GIF that is marginally more effective than the original.
      (shown at end of report)
       

      Ticket Booth
       

      Shoot 25¢
       

      From Inside Ring-Toss
       

      Main Attraction
       

      The Weed-lined Path
       

      Wheee!
       

      Domed (Doomed) Skating Rink
       

      Three scared cats in a dog park! (that's me on the right rockin' the Frampton 'do)
       

      Take Two
       
      If I ever come across the original transparencies again I will have to get some proper enlargements made.
    • By masodo
      Hi everyone,
      I am a blogger from the Indiana State and a fairly new member to Oblivion State.
      I am "a cyber explorer of the web less traveled" and it was while randomly exploring Belgian websites that I happened upon a link to this forum. I have pretty-much lived in and around Indianapolis all my life and worked for several years as an industrial/commercial photographer. Although it has been many years since climbing/crawling around factories and such looking for "the shot," seeing the work presented here has me thinking it may be time to dust off the 25A-Red and Polarizer combo and see if I might get back into the "game."
       
      I have been itching to contribute here so I decided to kick off the adventure with a blog post about this website (features the first 10 members I have followed.)
      Check it out if you want:
      Illuminating the Oblivion State
       

    • By eyevolve


      Built in 1896 and in continuous use until 1995, this pinwheel style quaker prison was a reflection of a similar one located nearby. You can tour that one for a few dollars and take as many pictures as you like. This one was not so easy....
       

       
      It was the site of a controversial decades-long dermatological, pharmaceutical, and biochemical weapons research projects involving testing on inmates.
       

       
      The prison is also notable for several major riots in the early 1970s.


       
      The prison was home to several trials which raised several ethical and moral questions pertaining to the extent to which humans can be experimented on. In many cases, inmates chose to undergo several inhumane trials for the sake of small monetary reward. The prison was viewed as a human laboratory.
      “All I saw before me were acres of skin. It was like a farmer seeing a fertile field for the first time.” Dr. X
       

       
      One inmate described experiments involving exposure to microwave radiation, sulfuric and carbonic acid, solutions which corroded and reduced forearm epidermis to a leather-like substance, and acids which blistered skin in the testicular areas.
       

       
      In addition to exposure to harmful chemical agents, patients were asked to physically exert themselves and were immediately put under the knife to remove sweat glands for examination. In more gruesome accounts, fragments of cadavers were stitched into the backs of inmates to determine if the fragments could grow back into functional organs.
       

       
      So common was the experimentation that in the 1,200-person prison facility, around 80% to 90% of inmates could be seen experimented on.
       

       
      The rise of testing harmful substances on human subjects first became popularized in the United States when President Woodrow Wilson allowed the Chemical Warfare Service (CAWS) during World War I.
       

       
      All inmates who were tested upon in the trials had consented to the experimentation, however, they mostly agreed for incentives like monetary compensation. Experiments in the prison often paid around $30 to $50 and even as much as $800. “I was in prison with a low bail. I couldn’t afford the monies to pay for bail. I knew that I wasn’t guilty of what I was being held for. I was being coerced to plea bargain. So, I thought, if I can get out of this, get me enough money to get a lawyer, I can beat this. That was my first thought.”
       

       
      I expected to find an epic medical ward only to be filled with disappointment. The practice was so common I can only assume it was conducted everywhere.
       

       
      Many advocates of the prison trials, such as Solomon McBride, who was an administrator of the prisons, remained convinced that there was nothing wrong with the experimentation at the Holmesburg prison. McBride argued that the experiments were nothing more than strapping patches of cloth with lotion or cosmetics onto the backs of patients and argued this was a means for prisoners to earn an easy income.
       

       
      The negative public opinion was particularly heightened by the 1973 Congressional Hearing on Human Experimentation. The hearing was supposed to discuss the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and clarify the ethical and legal implications of human experimental research. This climate called for a conscious public which rallied against the use of vulnerable populations such as prisoners as guinea pigs. Companies and organizations who associated themselves with human testing faced severe backlash. Amidst the numerous senate hearings, public relation nightmares, and opponents to penal experimentation, county prison boards realized human experimentation was no longer acceptable to the American public. Swiftly, human testing on prisoners was phased out of the United States.
       

       
      Only a renovated gymnasium is considered suitable for holding inmates. That building is frequently used for overflow from other city jails.
       

       
      The district attorney launched an extensive two year investigation documenting hundreds of cases of the rape of inmates.
       

       
      The United States had ironically been strong enforcers of the Nuremberg Code and yet had not followed the convention until the 1990s. The Nuremberg code states: “[T]he person involved should have legal capacity to give consent; should be so situated as to be able to exercise free power of choice, without the intervention of any element of force, fraud, deceit, duress, overreaching, or other ulterior form of constraint or coercion; and should have sufficient knowledge and comprehension of the elements of the subject matter involved as to enable him to make an understanding and enlightened decision.”
       

       
      The prison trials violated this definition of informed consent because inmates did not know the nature of materials they were experimented with and only consented due to the monetary reward. America’s shutting down of prison experimentation such as those in the prison signified the compliance of the Nuremberg Code of 1947.
       

       
      You look so precious.

       
       
       
       
    • By Rob Adventures
      Located In Columbus Ohio. Very popular urbex place.
       
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