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UK The Kings Hall - Southall, Middlesex - October 2017

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This one required an early start, but the morning adventure to The Kings Hall was worth the effort. Visited with Zombizza. 


"Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films.

By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church.

The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013"

The Explore

Started nice and early, and managed our entrance fairly incident free...if we don't count the massive tear in my trousers..

It's a pretty spectacular place with a wonderful blend of natural decay and marvelous original features/architecture. With little to no daylight, we decided to wonder round the back rooms while the sun came up before the spending too much time on the main attraction, the large auditorium. 

The rooms around the back are a weird mix of new and old, some of them being more disgusting than others. One room was so pungent that I took 2 steps in before bailing out. 
There was also one room that was filled with beds, old food packets and needles. Looked a few years old, but squatters for sure. 
The larger rooms consisted of meeting rooms, prayer rooms and teaching rooms. All of them had funky wavy flooring where the wooden floor tiles had expanded with moisture.

Eventually the sun came up and the auditorium started to flood with the golden morning light.
After a few hours we left, although the exit was hilariously unsubtle.



The Auditorium





















































  • Like 8

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Oh my giddy aunt :o

There's so much I love about what I see here!!!! The natural decay! The ceiling! The rippling floor!

I think I need to lie down...

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Nice one mate, you've really done a good job capturing this place, some epic shots there. Love the one looking down from the top especially :thumb 



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That's real nice! Like Jonesy says so much love! I'm loving how that floor has gone, how on earth did you get over that. Beautiful little place :thumb 

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Impressing building with beautiful decay, the dome is fascinating. I also really like the stairs with the green wall, the light and the colors there are very nice.

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