Jump to content
Gromr123

France Chateau Lumiere - France - May 2017

Recommended Posts

This one is from earlier on in the year during a trip to France/Luxembourg, one I thought worth posting up here!

 

Chateau Lumiere needs no introduction, a magnificent building with such grandeur its hard to believe its been abandoned. The huge glass skylight allows daylight to illuminate all the floors, making for wonderful lighting. During the last few years Chateau Lumiere become a bit of a tourist destination, with vandals smashing the large mirror in the big foyer. Luckily its fared well over its many years of dereliction and is still one of the most beautiful buildings I have had the pleasure of exploring.


History

 

Built in early 1900s, this house was owned by a tobacco tycoon from Switzerland. After the owner moved away in 1950s, the house was used for business purposes, and was sold multiple times before finally being left empty. 

There isn't a confirmed date it was abandoned, but the general consensus seems to say its in the 1980s. 


The Explore

 

After finally finding the location of it and seeing it was a reasonable distance from Luxembourg where were staying for 2 weeks, it  became a must do. We found a charming cheap hotel in the next town over and booked a night there. 

Finally the day was upon us and were there, stood outside awestruck by the Neo-Baroque styling of Lumiere.

We looked for a way inside and quickly found a well beaten track round the back. As we approached I could hear voices inside.

We definitely weren't the only visitors that day, in fact there were loads of people wondering around inside! 
Most other people were explorers like us, however some weren't there to take photos as it turned out a bit later...

 

We started with the basement and worked upwards. The basement actually had quite a bit of stuff still left there, unlike the rest of the floors that were bare to say the least. In fact the house was almost empty from the ground floor up. All the fittings and fixtures remained, but no personal items were left at all. 

We photographed it from nearly every angle we could think of. The best thing about Lumiere is just how photogenic it is. Its hard to take a bad picture.

It was a fairly relaxed explore, until we witnessed a group of 12 year olds smashing the glass skylight and then coming downstairs smashing bricks onto the marble floor. The red-mist descended as I yelled down at them at them from one of the skylight balcony's while waving my arms around like a loony. I must have looked like a madman. 

They didn't understand my English, I certainly didn't understand their French. Luckily they didn't stick around much longer to do any more damage. 

 

With the drama over we got back to the explore, now alone in the house. 

We spent about 3 hours inside in total, but you could easily spent much longer there if you wanted to photograph everything. 

One thing that struck me was the quality of every little detail. Silly things like the latches on the windows still work flawlessly and feels better made and smoother than any modern window latch I've used before. 

 

Anyway, on with the photos.

 

 

Photos

 

Externals

 

34375341020_016c28915f_b.jpg

 

34375329390_955c889c8a_b.jpg

 

34375322320_bf97a6c00e_b.jpg

 

34760407645_a25c289eb4_b.jpg

 

33952279603_71f0e414c6_b.jpg

 

34628559561_572551abab_b.jpg

 


Internals

 

In the porch there is this notice, translates roughly too:

 

"Many of us have seen that you like this in all its splendor. Photographers, Models, Fans of Urbex, but some unscrupulous individuals do not respect...Alas!

Yet you are known everywhere for your splendor, and the sublime cliches that you have brought us.

Today April 19, 2015 we owe you this ... to give you a bit of sparkle ... after the vandalism that you have undergone.

Thank you to those who will preserve you forever

Respect this place as you would at home

PLEASE!

Do not break! Do not vandalize it..

Do not leave rubbish, paper etc..

Bring your waste back with you.."

 

33952273093_1d5366bf07_b.jpg

 


The entrance hall and foyer.

34598293662_f896f7e3f5_b.jpg

 

34598318662_f6267e2dc1_b.jpg

 

33952252243_e34375e116_b.jpg

 

34760332995_135fd1a4fc_b.jpg

 

34721025896_68db39c1a6_b.jpg

 

34721013296_3a4a3ed82d_b.jpg

 


Sadly this used to be where the the large mirror was, but was broken in 2015.

 

34628584731_53f9e42572_b.jpg

 

34721006266_7b4e39ccfa_b.jpg

 

33918274934_d03bb9223c_b.jpg

 

34721002556_94abd79427_b.jpg

 

34375208940_69f9899b6b_b.jpg

 

33952165973_058201fbe1_b.jpg

 

34598215532_f2a2b9320f_b.jpg

 

34760203645_5c6a46a245_b.jpg

 

34760192865_10792a22dd_b.jpg

 

34720927816_b1e6c60a9e_b.jpg

 

34720921916_f7b5b942b3_b.jpg

 

33918208684_ff18d738c7_b.jpg

 

33952112613_569e73bd50_b.jpg

 

34375271500_61baebc5da_b.jpg

 

34720947076_6b9efd86ce_b.jpg

 

 

A rather interesting choice of wallpaper...

 

34598221202_f7cd6fee65_b.jpg

 

34720995656_1f4f186b86_b.jpg

 


Recent damage to the glass skylight.

 

34628535301_a7ec6faa90_b.jpg

 

34720989676_ba0ce976f5_b.jpg

 


Saw this in the loft and couldn't help but get a photo too

 

34375220710_63024966bc_b.jpg

 

 

The Details

 

33918480904_f883f91b9c_b.jpg

 

33918469374_6c985cb061_b.jpg

 

33918461704_013c908c1e_b.jpg

 

 

The Basement

 

34375145380_22a0f3eef1_b.jpg

 

34628402131_23f29fdaf9_b.jpg

 

33952079853_66b4e9f8fc_b.jpg

Edited by Gromr123
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Always nice to see. Just sad that some things have been destroyed by vandalism in recent years.
I prefer the normal photos than those with fisheye.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Similar Content

    • By Paradox
      So this was more of a cheeky little explore than anything planned in advance. A few of us were in the South of France for the Urban Explorer Wedding of the Year, an event that was most definitely epic and involved many many drunken selfies of at least half a dozen drunken explorers (including the Bride and Groom) but hey that's another story and not one for here
      The day after we left the Bride and Groom to do Honeymoony type things and took ourselves off on a trip to the local cokeworks/coal miney type place. It isn't epic or awesome but it was a pretty damn fine mooch to end the trip with.
       
      It is a derpy derp and appears to be a popular place to burn out cars but worth a trip anyway
       
      History is limited and in French so here is my best shot at something that vaguely resembles information but however doesn't mean a great deal to me and is probably worth skipping lol!....
       
      The Sainte Marie open pit was a coal mine of the Mining Unit of Tam, H.B.C.M. (Houilleres du Bassin Centre Midi), in the south-western part of France, near Albi. In this area, a large amount of coal has been exploited by Underground mining. This pit was designed in order to exploit the coal remaining around the shaft (Saint Marie shaft) of an old Underground mine situated in the basin of Carmaux.The diameter at the top of the pit was 1200 metres and its final depth was expected to be 300 metres. The first 100 metres were composed of tertiary deposits (clay and sand) which covered the carboniferous formation. The average slope angle of the Tertiary is 37° (without benches) and in the Coal Measures, it was foreseen from 37° to 50° (with benches of 6 metres high) depending on the slope situaüon. At present üme, the depth of the mine is about 160 metres. 
       
      Nine coal seams have been mined by Underground working between 1900 and 1984. Different methods have been used depending on the thickness, the dip of the layer and the dimension of the panel. In fact, panels were backfilled, caved or undermined long-wall. The basin of Carmaux is a large synclinal split by a dense network of faults which directions are approximately N 140 E. The dips and the dip directions which was left around the shaft, but, close to the slopes, begin the old exploited long walls. These long walls are at different topographic levels due to the particular structure and have been exploited in panels lined by the faults odented approximately N140.
       
      The first design of the open pit was done by a Standard geotechnical survey; this one has taken into account the geomechanical, hydrogeological, structural Parameters äs well äs the "decohesion", induced by the revival of subsidence due to old Underground mining. However, some mining slopes can locally present risks of slipping induced by old Underground mining.
       
      Anyway here are a few pics
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Thanks for looking
       
    • By Andy
      Ouvrage A28 is a smaller plant (petit ouvrage) of the Maginot Line.
      The site was surveyed by CORF (Commission d'Organisation des Régions Fortifiées), the Maginot Line's design and construction agency; A28 was approved for construction in May 1931. It was completed at a cost of 11 million francs by the contractor Duval-Weyrich of Nancy. The petit ouvrage was planned for construction in two phases. The second phase was to provide a separate entrance block a short distance to the rear. Heavy water infiltration required the provision of more extensive drainage work than originally planned. The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 meters (98 ft).
      The 1940 manning of the ouvrage under the command of Captain Coste comprised 127 men and 2 officers of the 161st Fortress Infantry Regiment.
      A28 played no significant role in either the Battle of France in 1940 or the Lorraine Campaign of 1944. After the Second World War it became part of a strongpoint in the northeastern defenses against Soviet attack. A28 remained under Army control until after 1971, when it was declassified and sold.
       
      Visited with The_Raw.
       
      1

       
      2

       
      3

       
      4

       
      5

       
      6

       
      7

       
      8

       
      9

       
      10

       
      11

       
      12

       
      13

       
      14

       
      15

       
      16

       
      17

       
    • By Andy
      In the former limestone mine a production for oxygen was shifted to the underground during World War II.
      Visited with The_Raw.
       
       
      1

       
      2

       
      3

       
      4

       
      5

       
      6

       
      7

       
      8

       
      9

       
      10

       
      11

       
      12

       
      13

       
      14

       
       
    • By Andy
      The fortress with a lot of murals in its bunkers is part of the second fortified belt of forts of Metz and had its baptism of fire in late 1944, when the Battle of Metz occurred. The Fortification was part of a wider program of fortifications called "Moselstellung", encompassing fortresses scattered between Thionville and Metz in the valley Moselle. The aim of Germany was to protect against a French attack to take back Alsace-Lorraine and Moselle from the German Empire. The fortification system was designed to accommodate the growing advances in artillery since the end of XIXth century. Based on new defensive concepts, such as dispersal and concealment, the fortified group was to be, in case of attack, an impassable barrier for French forces.
       
      Covering an area of 83 ha, the Fortress is constructed from 1907 to 1914. The group fortification has 2 fortified barracks and can accommodate a total of 560 men. It has 8 pieces of artillery, 6 of them 100mm and 2 of them 77mm. It has eight domes and twenty observation points and lookouts. The various items are connected by 1,700m of underground galleries. In its water tanks, it has 2,640 m3 of water. The energy required for its operation is ensured by seven diesel engines of 27 hp each.
      During The Annexation of Alsace-Lorraine, the fort receives a garrison of gunners belonging to the XVIth Army Corps. From 1914-1918, it served as a relay for the German soldiers at the front post. Its equipment and weapons are then at the forefront of military technology. In 1919, the fort was occupied by the French army. After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army reinvests the fort. In early September 1944, at the beginning of the Battle of Metz, the German command integrates the fort into the defensive system set up around Metz.
      In Second World War, on September 2, 1944, Metz is declared fortress Reich by Hitler. The fortress must be defended to the last by German troops.
       
      Visited with The_Raw, extreme_ironing and Maniac.
       
       
      1

       
      2

       
      3

       
      4

       
      5

       
      6

       
      7

       
      8

       
      9

       
      10

       
      11

       
      12

       
      13

       
      14

       
      15

       
      16

       
      17

       
      18

       
      19

       
      20

       
      21

       
      22

       
      23

       
      24

       
      25

       
      26

       
      27

       
      28

       
      29

       
      30

       
      31

       
      32

       
      33

       
      34

       
      35

       
      36

       
      37

       
       
×