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The_Raw

France Sanatorium Fromage Frais, France - January 2017

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A while back I posted a report from a creme de la menthe location called Chateau a la Mange Tout. This sanatorium sits on the same site, not bad having two half decent explores right next to each other, joie de vivre! I meant to post a report at the time but never got round to it. It wasn't massively photogenic so I only took a load of hand held shots but there was a fair bit of stuff inside. Bon appetit, as the French would say ;) 
 
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Last but not least we had a quick peek inside the morgue, no slab but some body fridges left behind.
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Tres bien ensemble
 
 
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Nice this Damo! I like that Art Deco hand rail and that chequered floor is pretty nice. Nice clean place with quite a bit to see. Fridges look mint too :thumb 

 

:comp: 

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Very well captured. My favorite is the photo with the dried plant in the middle of the room.

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1 hour ago, Dubbed Navigator said:

Looks like you could eat your dinner off some of those floors.

 

Any idea what this is?

 

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Fark knows mate, could be an anal probe of some sort? :105_point_right:

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