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    • By The_Raw
      Designed by Architect to the Metropolitan Police, John Dixon Butler FRIBA, the Greenwich Magistrates’ Court opened in 1909 with an integral police station. The Symmetrical frontage is faced in Portland Stone in a free Classical style and features a central semi-circular tablet with Royal Coat of Arms, carved in stone by Lawrence Turner.
       
      Inside, the entranceway leads to the former police station foyer which has a mosaic tiled floor with MP monogram (for Metropolitan Police) laid by Messrs Diespeker.  The foyer leads onto Court 1, the main courtroom which is toplit with a decorative plaster frieze around the light well and a monogram of Edward VII in plaster above the bench. The Courtroom has mostly original fittings and the bench is in a curved recess, up three steps. The court has its own custody suite. The suite consists of nine prison cells with associated facilities for booking in prisoners etc.
       
      Visited here with @AndyK! a few months back. We sat on this for a while as we were hoping to return and see if we missed any bits but haven't got around to it. Anyway, I think we saw all the best bits. Here are some of my photos to begin with, and a few taken by Andy at the end. I also poached the history from his website report, so cheers for that!   
       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
      A few shots of the custody suite from Andy
       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
      Thanks for looking  
    • By Lavino
      A very early start for this one. And thanks for my invite from the other 2 lads I went with @GK-WAX and @albinojay arrived here in the pitch black early hours. Luckily we didn’t have any trouble finding our way inside. We’re we found ourselves a room to wait for it to come light enough to have a look around. Watching the bustop across the road. That’s one seriously busy bustop. And another 2 guys turned up giving us a surprise we exchanged a few word and we all carried on. Here’s a few photos and history..
      HISTORY
      Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films.

      By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church.

      The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013"
      6C566847-A7B2-4B03-8B35-21A83B59D5DD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      11C63D3A-09F5-4CAF-B8DC-2D9DBAE3A34F by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      DF9E3CFA-46FB-4F59-8E89-05044F4D4E0D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      291685A1-C7A5-4C05-AE0D-EAA5E9E3BE3D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      A942D367-319B-4051-9965-CBC9BE782D97 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      B6451F47-AED7-46C9-BC1F-FBB8716DC866 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      EFEFBB87-D905-4675-B792-572677174349 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      4FF422D0-9457-4DBB-A0FD-B3A59E0105DA by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      6388F9DD-1E6B-43E1-B475-C54D7702ADD7 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      8F93F594-6E02-49A8-90EE-77146630400A by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      F0EA6489-742D-4A55-B053-E9407A809A35 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      D6912FEB-7A41-4075-BF3F-18CC92A71332 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      82C5654A-58D8-4F3D-ABA7-6FFA3CE99615 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      EF6C4F61-3E43-4EA3-99E3-79E7A4CD7986 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
       
      url=https://flic.kr/p/21w7SoA][/url]7E8CA3B9-870B-4597-BE8C-822A743FA4B8 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      05FFBC9B-A065-4D18-ADAA-AC06F324A28C by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      596A95BD-32DA-4213-9C8E-06061841A60B by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      732BCB12-D01B-4F4E-9ADF-B1C86B4F2D95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      0CCE03D2-1009-4B27-BF40-1FC90159D5C5 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      170B80EE-4ADD-4D0C-9AEE-076DA9AA07D3 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      2A00922B-01E0-4236-9129-02F812E7E710 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      DF19BB97-1E29-4ECC-8B17-A1A4B30B7C95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      E4354E42-97FB-4BA5-BC76-2304A4DF14CC by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      D3A585BC-9EA7-4A96-A87E-58351FCC62B2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      C88FDA25-E4EC-4269-9D64-A91725F507F2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      9A4FC978-0A5C-43D3-A340-BF4ABF5EC679 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      6FED0FA9-4A21-4C0B-ABB0-1D6C5EB0721D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      5056F5C5-4624-400D-BF20-7ECF2C724B3E by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      0D7DEB4E-2C2C-4A67-82C6-A80B4153E5DF by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      E3A4C8B4-8A02-4816-85BF-51EED2EDFEFD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      18858080-1428-48B5-8F3F-2416CDCDF481 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
      2FA9A65E-7F5B-4BE6-A4E8-2418BAABEB71 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
    • By Andy
      Ouvrage A28 is a smaller plant (petit ouvrage) of the Maginot Line.
      The site was surveyed by CORF (Commission d'Organisation des Régions Fortifiées), the Maginot Line's design and construction agency; A28 was approved for construction in May 1931. It was completed at a cost of 11 million francs by the contractor Duval-Weyrich of Nancy. The petit ouvrage was planned for construction in two phases. The second phase was to provide a separate entrance block a short distance to the rear. Heavy water infiltration required the provision of more extensive drainage work than originally planned. The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 meters (98 ft).
      The 1940 manning of the ouvrage under the command of Captain Coste comprised 127 men and 2 officers of the 161st Fortress Infantry Regiment.
      A28 played no significant role in either the Battle of France in 1940 or the Lorraine Campaign of 1944. After the Second World War it became part of a strongpoint in the northeastern defenses against Soviet attack. A28 remained under Army control until after 1971, when it was declassified and sold.
       
      Visited with The_Raw.
       
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    • By WildBoyz
      History

      As far as history goes for this particular property, it is sparse as it is nothing more than a fairly modern residential building. One newspaper based in Barnsley reported that traffic came to a standstill as a result of a fire at the property on Rotherham Road. Two fire crews attended the scene and spent two-and-a-half hours extinguishing the blaze. A second source suggests that the fire was caused by a lit candle, and that a woman had a lucky escape. The woman concerned apparently suffered slight smoke inhalation but was otherwise in good health. The property itself is an average sized two-storey house. Its notable features include an indoor swimming pool and a spiral staircase. 

      Our Version of Events

      Of all the places we could end up in, we ended up in Barnsley. After looking at the town hall and wandering around the town and its meat and fish market for half an hour it didn’t take long to run out of things to do, so we decided we might as well look for an explore. However, the best thing we could find, unfortunately, was an old burnt down house. We tried a couple of other spots beforehand but didn’t have much luck overall. 

      The house on Rotherham Road is exactly what you might expect for a residential explore – mostly empty and damp. As noted above, though, it does feature an indoor swimming pool where you can try your hand at floating across on doors someone has thrown in. Needless to say, we weren’t very successful but it was certainly worth a quick go. The second bit of the building that’s worth a look at is the spiral staircase in what we think was the former living room. This room was the most photogenic part of the explore so we spent most of our time in here. Going up the staircase turned out to be a complete waste of time because this is where the fire was. There is very little left of the roof and most of the floorboards look rather fucked. Compared to the mansions and castles of Belgium and France, then, this explore is a big disappointment, but it does kill fifteen minutes if you happen to be passing and fancy a swim. 

      Explored with Ford Mayhem. 
       
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