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The Mcneil Mansion burlington city new jersey..Mcniel was a pipe maker he created his own enclosed town..he had his own electicty factory,his own firehouse,all next to his pipe factory

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as it once looked

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There was amovement to tear it down...i tried my ancient hebrew curse resh resh...to stop it..and so far its worked

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parts of the mansion are dangerous..my foot sank a few times that a sign to move quick

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the main stair case..there are a few other stairways up

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each room has its own decay

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it had its own elevator

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he had huge walk in safes in the basement

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some parts of the mansion wre in good shape

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the mansion is ust one of the bjuildings on the site theres many more..some are in the video...a few ghost voices are caught including my name being called

 

 

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Assuming from the first photo, I would have expected a better condition inside. Thanks for showing.

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