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    • By JohnAgnelo
      This mansion was the home of a local noble family that built it in the end of the XVIII Century, the house was renovated around the time of the First World War and is now abandoned for around 20 years. There where some homeless people living in a section of the house some time ago but their gone now.
      I could not find more information on the property but i plan to come back for a more complete exploration and to take more Photos.
       
      This is the Front Facade, there is coat of Arms but i could'nt reach closer to this Facade.
       

      There was a beautiful chapell inside the House but both the cealing and the floor are collapsing.
       

      Some of the furniture is still on the house along with multiple photos and documents.
       

      In the back we can see the real size of the house.
       

      It as a wonderfull view of the city and it's river.
       

      It as wonderfull rooms with carved fireplaces but i didnt had the time to explore the entire house. 
       

      Some photos and paintings and books in the Main Bedroom.
       
      I will come back to take better photos and will publish them in a new topic.

    • By obscureserenity
      Campina Youth House
       
       
      Haven't seen this one posted anywhere so I decided to chuck a quick report up on it. I would say this particular location could be described as disused rather than abandoned, as it looked like there was redevelopment work going on when we arrived. Hence why it is so nice and pristine. Anyway, onto a little bit of history I found..
       
      History

      The Youth House was orginally built as a leisure centre in Campina. A city situated roughly around the South East of Romania. It was constructed by local authorites in order to create a space for young people to participate in a range of sporting activities such as: aerobics, matrial arts and boxing. It was also established in order to promote culture and education and the house provided various facilities for the arts. The Youth House hosted a large auditorium to  showcase fairs, exhibitions, conventions, concerts and festivals. 
       
       
      Visit

      Visited with @darbians and Gina on a long weekend trip to Romania. We were driving past and saw what we orginally thought was a hotel and decided to check it out. Finding this place was defintely an unsuspected susprise and I'm very glad we decided to pull over. I really enjoyed photographing this one and I espiecally liked the mosiacs which reminded me of the ones at Buzludzha I had seen the previous year. I hope you enjoy my report!
       
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
      When you find a window open on the top floor, gotta get a few photos from the roof 
       

       

       
       
      Thanks for reading!
       
    • By peanutbutter_crackers
      I first visited this former mental hospital back in June 2012 and alot has changed since that time ...some good some bad. This hospital started it's life  in the 1920's  and closed in 1994. At it's largest capacity it had 5,818 patients.  Like many other state hospitals in the U.S it had it's own farm , laundry, bakery, refrigeration plants etc and various other buildings were built in later years such as a chapel and larger separate hospital  built in 1966 for infirm patients which had, an operating room, laboratory, diagnostic equipment, clinics, medical library and mortuary. When I first visited here it was overgrown with poison ivy, tall grass....just unkempt and relatively easy as no one seemed to be watching it. There were plans to convert it to senior housing but that never happened and in 2013/2014 a group bought it to convert it into a college. I had planned to visit about that time when a friend who visited said they'd already taken out the morgue contents of the larger building. He also said they'd oddly started fixing up the auditorium but other things left untouched. He also discovered  had started doing illegal abatement  and word got out and they were shut down. It  still sits partially abated which gives a new look to what I'd seen before but it also took away some of the charm. I of course wanted to see the big morgue when I went back...whenever that was I wasn't sure. Well last summer I was able to get back and the place is much trickier to do since there's a damn security guy 24/7 who seems to make usual rounds. All the doors have been screwed shut with the exception of a few....of course way out in the wide open.  We got there very early in the morning so I took a few night shots. I might add the old morgue thankfully is still there in the older hospital building although all the doors have been taken.  I would like to add that this place is sheer hell due to the tunnels which I didn't need to use in 2012 (since we were able to freely walk around) and is most known because of these horrific tunnels LOL.  You basically are crouched in some while going down or up very steeply (depending on how you enter the campus) and are narrow as well as filled with the white crap (most likely asbestos) from the pipes that have fallen on the floor. I did not enjoy them at all and we actually left earlier than I wanted because we were both exhausted from carrying the heavy backpacks and navigating the tunnels trying to find a new way out so we didn't go back up the tunnels. I plan to go back though and get pics of things we missed.  So here are some pics from my early visit which are crap. I can't re-edit them due to losing them via the cat who knocked the external HD to the floor a couple years ago. I was not a good photographer of buildings back then as I came from nature so this "architecture" was a whole new game for me. I struggled a bit with composition and lighting.....and used a fisheye at times  Unfortunately I don't have the same pics of old trip of auditorium to compare with how it is now. I never edited and uploaded the old ones    Forgot to add I stopped by in the winter last year to take a few exteriors hence the snow pics
       
       


























    • By Doug
      Made by a bunch of Melbourne Cave Clan members and used by even more Melbourne Cave Clan members.
      It was so much fun. Definitely worth doing on a waterway near you
      It's a bit epic, but maybe someone out there will enjoy a look.
       
    • By Punk
      History
       
      Butternut is a foulwater storage tank in the suburb of Saint Henri. It was built in the 1980's with the increasing population of the local area. Essentially this is two long box sections, divided by pillars every 7 feet and split into 3 sections by 2 trenches for the soup to flow back into the sewerage system.
       
      Explore
       
      By this point in the week, our numbers were dwindling. Still a fun evening which was finished with mimosas on a friends balcony, before sleeping on said balcony.
      Although being entirely made of concrete, this was very photogenic. There was plenty of evidence of it's purpose on the floor, but the worms didn't seem to mind. There were hundreds of them.
      Great end to an epic week.
       
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      Cheers for Looking
       
       



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