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Lavino

UK Kings hall theatre southall London November 2017

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A very early start for this one. And thanks for my invite from the other 2 lads I went with @GK-WAX and @albinojay arrived here in the pitch black early hours. Luckily we didn’t have any trouble finding our way inside. We’re we found ourselves a room to wait for it to come light enough to have a look around. Watching the bustop across the road. That’s one seriously busy bustop. And another 2 guys turned up giving us a surprise we exchanged a few word and we all carried on. Here’s a few photos and history..

HISTORY

Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films.

By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church.

The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013"

38409516546_e89a50c726_h.jpg6C566847-A7B2-4B03-8B35-21A83B59D5DD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409520536_cb1e1da52a_h.jpg11C63D3A-09F5-4CAF-B8DC-2D9DBAE3A34F by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

24593406758_94d1b12bde_h.jpgDF9E3CFA-46FB-4F59-8E89-05044F4D4E0D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409520786_56f285ffb8_h.jpg291685A1-C7A5-4C05-AE0D-EAA5E9E3BE3D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409516846_b072360eb6_h.jpgA942D367-319B-4051-9965-CBC9BE782D97 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409521026_19ec8a8769_h.jpgB6451F47-AED7-46C9-BC1F-FBB8716DC866 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409517376_c6af1f75ab_h.jpgEFEFBB87-D905-4675-B792-572677174349 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409521416_0a1dfd8462_h.jpg4FF422D0-9457-4DBB-A0FD-B3A59E0105DA by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409521756_6158922c6e_h.jpg6388F9DD-1E6B-43E1-B475-C54D7702ADD7 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

24593407258_d12898f1d8_h.jpg8F93F594-6E02-49A8-90EE-77146630400A by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409522096_7c9920aa41_h.jpgF0EA6489-742D-4A55-B053-E9407A809A35 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409522336_2cfc464a89_h.jpgD6912FEB-7A41-4075-BF3F-18CC92A71332 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409518356_de7e4923dc_h.jpg82C5654A-58D8-4F3D-ABA7-6FFA3CE99615 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409522876_b8eaa167c3_h.jpgEF6C4F61-3E43-4EA3-99E3-79E7A4CD7986 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

 

38409527606_5963e47d36_h.jpg7E8CA3B9-870B-4597-BE8C-822A743FA4B8 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409527726_2cab14cdf9_h.jpg05FFBC9B-A065-4D18-ADAA-AC06F324A28C by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409527986_23df0680ca_h.jpg596A95BD-32DA-4213-9C8E-06061841A60B by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409528256_60a771af7c_h.jpg732BCB12-D01B-4F4E-9ADF-B1C86B4F2D95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409520256_2573258c04_h.jpg0CCE03D2-1009-4B27-BF40-1FC90159D5C5 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409523806_4f216c28a4_h.jpg170B80EE-4ADD-4D0C-9AEE-076DA9AA07D3 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

24593407788_954b1923a4_h.jpg31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

24593407788_954b1923a4_h.jpg31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409524136_33bda2188e_h.jpg2A00922B-01E0-4236-9129-02F812E7E710 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38464618561_8b872996b0_h.jpgDF19BB97-1E29-4ECC-8B17-A1A4B30B7C95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409524606_9f26a5944c_h.jpgE4354E42-97FB-4BA5-BC76-2304A4DF14CC by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38464619101_8276632fa8_h.jpgD3A585BC-9EA7-4A96-A87E-58351FCC62B2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409525156_b1bb3ac8ba_h.jpgC88FDA25-E4EC-4269-9D64-A91725F507F2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409519126_f2a9564b9f_h.jpg9A4FC978-0A5C-43D3-A340-BF4ABF5EC679 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409519366_6bef007991_h.jpg6FED0FA9-4A21-4C0B-ABB0-1D6C5EB0721D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38464619701_12765b38b0_h.jpg5056F5C5-4624-400D-BF20-7ECF2C724B3E by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409526386_f70aa8f612_h.jpg0D7DEB4E-2C2C-4A67-82C6-A80B4153E5DF by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409519606_4919240acf_h.jpgE3A4C8B4-8A02-4816-85BF-51EED2EDFEFD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38464620211_a8313ce232_h.jpg18858080-1428-48B5-8F3F-2416CDCDF481 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

38409527476_056b417455_h.jpg2FA9A65E-7F5B-4BE6-A4E8-2418BAABEB71 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr

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